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the disgruntled democrat: Life, Liberty, and the Sociopathic Pursuit of Wealth

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.(The United States Declaration of Independence)Well… . . . → Read More: the disgruntled democrat: Life, Liberty, and the Sociopathic Pursuit of Wealth

the disgruntled democrat: Life, Liberty, and the Sociopathic Pursuit of Wealth

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.(The United States Declaration of Independence)Well… . . . → Read More: the disgruntled democrat: Life, Liberty, and the Sociopathic Pursuit of Wealth

Things Are Good: Be Happy With What You Have

It’s often thought that if one had more money they would be happier, bills would be easy to pay and work would be less stressful. It turns out that that is not the case. Once one has their basic needs met the more they earn the less of an impact it has on their happiness. […]

The post Be Happy With What You Have appeared first on Things Are Good.

. . . → Read More: Things Are Good: Be Happy With What You Have

Dead Wild Roses: Wealth Inequality in Canada – Broadbent Institute

Perceptions are so important when dealing with societies problems. How Canada’s wealth is perceived to be divided and how it actually is obscures the need for greater measures to insure wealth equality in our nation. Check out the full report … . . . → Read More: Dead Wild Roses: Wealth Inequality in Canada – Broadbent Institute

Things Are Good: Kickstarter CEO Wants You to Have a New Job

Yancey Strickler is the CEO and cofounder of Kickstarter he sees the future of work and the economy different than most CEOs. Strickler sees a future with people working jobs that actually matter for causes that make the world a better a place. Instead of profit over people, we can have people who all profit.

. . . → Read More: Things Are Good: Kickstarter CEO Wants You to Have a New Job

The Canadian Progressive: These 1 percenters are sharing their wealth with the 99 percent

These 1 percenters are doing what the global Occupy movement demanded back in 2011. They’re sharing their wealth with the 99 percent.

The post These 1 percenters are sharing their wealth with the 99 percent appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Things Are Good: Redistribute Neighbourhoods Instead of Wealth

People hate taxes despite the fact that basically every person who studies economics knows they are needed and a great way to spur economic success. Despite the fact taxes are needed and good at helping poorer people in society, taxes are hated.

As a result, some researchers in the USA have looked into alternative ways . . . → Read More: Things Are Good: Redistribute Neighbourhoods Instead of Wealth

The Canadian Progressive: Free trade to blame for growing income inequality in Canada

A study recently released by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives found that the modern free trade era has exacerbated income inequality in Canada.

The post Free trade to blame for growing income inequality in Canada appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Political Eh-conomy: The lament for Canada’s middle class

I’ve been posting more sparsely lately for a number of external reasons but this should change soon I hope. For now, here is the first major piece I wrote for Ricochet. In some ways, it’s the obligatory piece on Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century, but really it’s my way of trying to think . . . → Read More: Political Eh-conomy: The lament for Canada’s middle class

Political Eh-conomy: Supermanagers and the social psychology of wealth

By now, Thomas Piketty’s U-shaped graphs of wealth and income concentration are well known. What has received less attention are the differences between the last, early-20th-century inequality peak and today. One important difference is that the composition of wealth and income has changed: more of the income of the wealthy today comes from (ostensibly, at . . . → Read More: Political Eh-conomy: Supermanagers and the social psychology of wealth

Things Are Good: IMF: Tax the Rich to Improve the Economy

The International Monetary Fund has just completed a study that compiled data across time and space to conclude that taxation isn’t harmful for economies. Indeed, taxing the rich is actually very beneficial for any national economy because it stops inequality – which is an awful thing for both people and economic progress.

Labelled as the . . . → Read More: Things Are Good: IMF: Tax the Rich to Improve the Economy

Political Eh-conomy: We can’t all be workers: Putting inequality in the inequality debate

It’s easy to get confused about who is a worker and who isn’t these days. Your CEO may worker longer hours than you, not the top-hatted capitalist of the Monopoly board he. Indeed, it may seem that the leisure class of the turn of the last century has been replaced by the workaholic professional and . . . → Read More: Political Eh-conomy: We can’t all be workers: Putting inequality in the inequality debate

The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada’s Luxury Index is through the roof

Numbers season is over but good inequality data is still missing. January sees us regularly bombarded with a whole range of economic statistics about the previous year. GDP growth: likely 1.7%, low but looking brighter for next year. Unemployment: 7.2%, low but lots of workers leaving the job market altogether as the employment rate stagnates. . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada’s Luxury Index is through the roof

Bill Longstaff: Capitalism—an irrational system in an age of climate change

Capitalism is generally recognized as having one great strength. That, of course, is as a creator of wealth. Aided by the remarkable advance of technology (some would say inspired and facilitated by capitalism) it has created wealth unknown before in human history.

Capitalism is also generally recognized as having one great weakness. It is a . . . → Read More: Bill Longstaff: Capitalism—an irrational system in an age of climate change

The Disaffected Lib: "When Wealth Disappears"

The chief economist of HSBC. Stephen D. King, says we’re in for a dose of reality – the best days are no longer ahead of us.   Growth-driven prosperity, as most of us have known it our entire lives, has run its course.

From the end of World War II to the brief interlude . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: "When Wealth Disappears"

bastard.logic: Down and Out in Harperconia

Sweet tit-humping Christ I’m tired.

Tired of the chronic lack of accountability in Ottawa. Of a parliamentary press corps that been for far too long too prissy and timid to rightly ferret and call out endless examples Conservative corruption with tenacious vigour (see also: libel chill).

Tired of national apathy and cynicism understandably bred by . . . → Read More: bastard.logic: Down and Out in Harperconia

bastard.logic: Down and Out in Harperconia

Sweet tit-humping Christ I’m tired.

Tired of the chronic lack of accountability in Ottawa. Of a parliamentary press corps that been for far too long too prissy and timid to rightly ferret and call out endless examples Conservative corruption with tenacious vigour (see also: libel chill).

Tired of national apathy and cynicism understandably bred by . . . → Read More: bastard.logic: Down and Out in Harperconia

Left Over: Subsidizing Reality in BC

B.C. premier’s office mobbed over child-care costs CBC News Posted: Mar 9, 2013 4:49 PM PT

Lots of people complain that those who cannot afford childcare should simply stay home, or conversely, have no children until they can afford them (the 12th of never for many.) Let’s be honest and creative here (and, full disclosure, . . . → Read More: Left Over: Subsidizing Reality in BC

Boreal Citizen: The bumpy road to Boomer responsibility

Is there a Baby Boomer so dim in this land of rackets and swindles who thinks that he or she will escape the wrath of the Millennials rising? The developing story is so obvious that only an academic economist could fail to notice. – James Howard Kunstler, Democratic Underground

This was not my intended topic . . . → Read More: Boreal Citizen: The bumpy road to Boomer responsibility

The Progressive Economics Forum: Wealth Inequality and Neo Liberalism

I have a commentary posted on the Broadbent Institute web site, arguing that inequality of wealth fundamentally undermines the argument that market rewards are “fair.”

http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/en/blog/andrew-jackson-distribution-wealth-implications-neo-liberal-justification-economic-inequality

The Scott Ross: If A Fiscal Cliff Kills, Canada Should Tax Death

“In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” – Benjamin Franklin

The fiscal cliff in the United States did not just endanger its own country’s economy but the world’s, including Canada’s heavily dependent one. But in the American problem lies, at least partially, a Canadian solution: an estate . . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: If A Fiscal Cliff Kills, Canada Should Tax Death

350 or bust: Take Time To Renew Your Spirit

The Progressive Economics Forum: Poverty in Yukon

No, you can’t achieve anything you set your mind to

We all remember when we were kids or even adolescents how our parents used to tell us that we can accomplish anything we set our minds to, that we can conquer any obstacle society puts in front of us, that our achievements would only be limited by the amount of enthusiasm and perseverance we can . . . → Read More: No, you can’t achieve anything you set your mind to

bastard.logic: Breaking it Down: Industrial Capitalism vs. Financial Capitalism (or, Why We’re F*cked)

Michael Hudson asks: “In light of the enormous productivity gains since the end of World War II – and especially since 1980 – why isn’t everyone rich and enjoying the leisure economy that was promised?”

The answer (per Hudson) is painfully obvious, but bears repeating (ad infinitum):

What was applauded as a post-industrial economy . . . → Read More: bastard.logic: Breaking it Down: Industrial Capitalism vs. Financial Capitalism (or, Why We’re F*cked)