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Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Shared Knowledge Conference – Regina

These videos are from the second day of the Shared Knowledge Conference at the Core Ritchie Centre, the second weekend of June.

Jim Elliott with many interesting (and terrifying) facts about Regina’s watershed system.

We are on the Plaza @MarketRegina today. Find us beside @TrogiFoods #honey #salsa pic.twitter.com/wGd2bYiBVB

— Zee-Bee Honey® (@_zeebeehoney_) June 24, 2015

James and Brooke of Sound Solar Systems:

Next, I presented on Bitcoin and alternate currencies being used to build alternate economies apart from the monetary systems provided by governments.

Dan B. of Tradebank Regina

Lindsay H. wraps up with what’s in store for (Read more…)

. . . → Read More: Saskboy’s Abandoned Stuff: Shared Knowledge Conference – Regina

The Common Sense Canadian: Halt Site C construction until courts have ruled, First Nations demand

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip is among the First Nations leaders demanding a halt to Site C construction (D. Gillis)

BC Hydro is intent on bulldozing ahead with Site C Dam construction in the coming weeks, despite seven different federal and provincial court cases currently in progress over the $9 Billion proposed project. That attitude is rubbing First Nations leaders the wrong way.

Hydro above the law?

The First Nations Leadership Council, comprised of the three big provincial First Nations bodies – the Union of BC Indian Chiefs, the First Nations Summit and the BC Assembly of First Nations – came out swinging Thursday in defence (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Regina and its citizens did fairly well responding to a water shortage – but has plenty to learn in applying the lesson to the wider collective challenge of climate change.

For further reading…- The water shortage began a month ago, with CBC’s coverage here and here largely describing the problem and the City’s initial response. And CTV reported on the end to the immediate restrictions here. – In contrast, Rob Kuznia reports on Rancho Santa Fe’s appalling response to California’s drought, which has given rise to mandatory water use reductions.- The National Resources Defence (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Daniel Tencer discusses the latest evidence that trickle-down economics are a fraud, while David Roberts and Javier Zarracina write about how the elite seems to get its own way even when the results are worse for everybody. And Heather Stewart reports on the IMF’s findings as to the connection between financialization, inequality and stagnation as the extraction of wealth comes to be valued more than the production of anything useful.

- Meanwhile, Simon Enoch and Cheryl Stadnichuk observe that Saskatchewan is headed down a well-worn path to ruin based on the Wall (Read more…)

Cowichan Conversations: Steves–BC Doesn’t Need Site C Dam

Richard Hughes-Political Blogger

It is incredible that our BC Liberal government, prodded along by the foreign owned LNG corporations, are still pushing ahead with building a massive Site C Dam.

We do not need

Read more…

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Jim Stanford points out how the corporate tax pendulum is swinging back toward asking business to make an equitable contribution to Canadian society: The federal rate was cut virtually in half after 2000 (to just 15 per cent today). Several provincial governments followed suit. Alberta was the most aggressive, slashing its rate by more than one-third (to just 10 per cent) by 2006. This sparked a destructive race to the bottom among provinces – aided by explicit threats from companies to move head offices to Alberta if other provinces didn’t follow suit. (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Rafe Mair’s Modest Proposal: Scrap environmental assessments

The 3-member NEB Joint Review Panel for the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline (Damien Gillis)

Do you enjoy being a raw hypocrite?

Well, if you’re a taxpayer in Canada that’s what you are because you support raw hypocrisy every day in the various hearings on environmental matters that take place.

I’ve written in the past, from personal experience, about environmental assessments of independent power projects (IPPs), the environmental disgraces of British Columbia, and how they are so biased in favour of industry that it defies all but spluttering language of anger.

Let’s call the whole thing off

Economist (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: With Millions To Spare, Here’s How to Save Thousands of Lives

This rich couple is doing good with their money.

Regina caught sight of a jacket in the water during the cruise, and when she asked about it, she was told it might belong to a dead migrant who was trying to find safety in Europe.

While some Europeans criticize the rescue operation, saying it draws more migrants to the sea, Xuereb says that’s just not true. People are desperate, undertaking the journey to find a better life. They deserve to live, he says.

Last year, about 218,000 people made this journey — a record. Some 3,500 people drowned. And the (Read more…)

Cowichan Conversations: CVRD Off To The Supreme Court To Assert Land Use Jurisdiction and Authority Over SIA Contaminated Soil Processing and Treatment

Richard Hughes- Political Blogger

The CVRD has finally resurrected their stalled BC Supreme Court action attempting to have the CVRD Shawnigan bylaws regulating land use recognized, respected and adhered to.

While this is a

Read more…

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Heather Stewart writes about the OECD’s study showing the connection between increasingly precarious work and worsening inequality. 

- Tara Deschamps reports on a few of the challenges facing poor Torontonians, while Sara Mojtehedzadeh and Laurie Monsebraaten cover the United Way’s report card showing that most workers are now stuck in precarious work. And Star offers a few policy suggestions to improve that situation, while Ella Bedard points out how Andrew Cash is pushing for solutions at the federal level.

- Edward Keenan writes that it’s long past time to stop relying (Read more…)

Things Are Good: Boycott Bottled Water for a Better World

Bottle water is a sham and you all know this. The problem is that a lot of people don’t and that our society permits these individuals to continue their unwarranted consumption.

Water is the oil of the 21st century in terms of politics and conflict. It’s best not to make the situation worse by engaging in a system which denies people access to their local water while massive corporations make huge profits from water.

What’s more is that the water from your taps (in the developed world at least) is cleaner and safer than bottled water.

The reason you should (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Justice for the Peace: Site C Dam goes to court

While the BC Liberal government and BC Hydro are vowing to break ground on the controversial $9 Billion Site C Dam this summer, the projects faces numerous legal challenges – one of which got a boost from the federal court recently. The Common Sense Canadian’s Damien Gillis discussed the issues with Ian Jessop on Victoria’s CFAX 1070 this past Monday.

The post Justice for the Peace: Site C Dam goes to court appeared first on The Common Sense Canadian.

The Common Sense Canadian: Site C Dam: Crown strikes out with attempt to gut First Nation’s Judicial Review

Location of proposed Site C Dam (photo: Damien Gillis)

The federal government struck out in court Friday in its attempt to gut key passages of the Doig River First Nation’s Judicial Review into the environmental certificate for Site C Dam.

After 3 hours of arguments on the crown’s motion to strike, brought with the support of the province, the presiding Prothonotary Lafreniere not only threw out the government’s argument – which he derided as “a very rare request” – but ordered costs be paid to the First Nation plaintiff. The decision presents another legal roadblock to the $9 Billion dam, (Read more…)

Cowichan Conversations: CHEK TV Breaks News That A Stop Work Order Has Been Issued for Shawnigan Contaminated Soil Dumping

Richard ‘Hub’ Hughes- Political Blogger

Could this be the BC Liberal’s exit strategy? The opposition is broad, deep and committed.

The CVRD has dusted off their BC Supreme Court action to have their land

Read more…

The Common Sense Canadian: New interactive map reveals largest farmland exclusion in ALR history for Site C Dam

Screen capture from www.arcgis.com

“On April 8, 2015, with the stroke of a pen, the BC Government made the largest exclusion of land from the Agricultural Land Reserve in BC history,” said Hudson’s Hope Mayor Gwen Johansson, upon the release of a new interactive map which visualizes the enormous loss.

“Without Agricultural Land Commission review or public hearings, 3715 hectares (9180 acres) of ALR land was removed from production for Site C dam.”

Yet the overall impact of the dam on BC’s increasingly scarce agricultural land base is even worse than that, according to two expert agrologists who presented their findings (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: First Nation group and allies resist re-opening of Mount Polley mine

Secwepemc Woman’s Warrior Society leads a strong movement against the re-opening of Imperial Metals’ Mount Polley mines following catastrophic 2014 spill.

The post First Nation group and allies resist re-opening of Mount Polley mine appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Cowichan Conversations: From toilet to table: Peecycling research at U of M investigates urine as fertilizer

I tripped across this article in the Treehugger this morning. Interesting project taking place in Michigan that utilizes urine as a beneficial resource providing nitrogen and phosphorous sans industrial production.

As the population continues to

Read more…

The Common Sense Canadian: New book asks: Can civilization survive unprecedented climate crisis?

Water scarcity and resulting wars will be a key consequence of the climate crisis

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that human-caused climate change is already responsible for 150,000 deaths annually. If we continue our current trajectories of “business as usual” as our response to climate change, the WHO expects that between 2030 and 2050 climate change will cause approximately 250,000 additional deaths per year.

According to the WHO, the yearly death rate will include, “38 000 due to heat exposure in elderly people, 48 000 due to diarrhoea, 60 000 due to malaria, and 95 000 due to childhood under nutrition. (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Landowners launch Site C Dam court challenge, First Nations next

On Monday, a group of landowners and farmers from BC’s Peace River Valley launched the first of seven legal challenges that threaten to derail the government’s $9 Billion planned Site C Dam.

This challenge is rooted in the government’s decision to ignore key concerns raised by the Joint Review Panel for the project – including cost and the fact that the need for the project had not been demonstrated, while alternatives were left unexplored.

“This is about applying the rule of law,” counsel Maegen Giltrow told media outside the court Monday morning, explaining that the government had violated its own terms (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Paul Krugman highlights the policy areas where we need to look to the public sector for leadership – including those such as health care and income security where we all have a strong interest in making sure that nobody’s left behind. And Andre Picard reminds us of one of the major gaps in Canada’s health care system, as expensive prescription drugs can make for a devastating barrier to needed care.

- Meanwhile, Paul Buchheit duly criticizes the combination of increasing wealth for the lucky few in the U.S., and increasing (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Canada takes water for granted amid melting snowpacks, glaciers

BC’s Glacier National Park has seen decreasing snowpacks in recent years (Sesivany/Jiri Eischmann/Wikipedia)

How long can you go without water? You could probably survive a few weeks without water for cooking. If you stopped washing, the threat to your life might only come from people who can’t stand the smell. But most people won’t live for more than three days without water to drink. It makes sense: our bodies are about 65 per cent water.

According to the United Nations, about 750 million people lack access to safe water — that’s one in nine! One child dies every minute from (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Water is life; we can’t afford to waste it

Water is life, and its management and conservation is about global social justice, argues renowned environmentalist David Suzuki.

The post David Suzuki: Water is life; we can’t afford to waste it appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Common Sense Canadian: Lawyer warns LNG industry: Don’t count on power from Site C dam

Lawyer Rob Botterell represents First Nations and landowners in the Peace Valley region

The following is an open letter sent by lawyer Rob Botterell to the BC LNG Alliance, key BC Liberal ministers, and Treaty 8 First Nations. Site C Dam is being looked to as a possible source for the additional power required for proposed LNG plants on the BC coast.

Dear Respected First Nations, LNG Industry and BC Government Leaders:

In my capacity as a lawyer who has represented First Nations for many years, I am writing to you about the relationship between the planned Site C dam and the proposed new (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- In advance of this weekend’s Progress Summit, Robin Sears comments on the significance of the Broadbent Institute and other think tanks in shaping policy options: The Center for American Progress was the wakeup call for progressives around the world. Independent-minded, massively funded, deeply professional, it was created to develop winning agendas for a new Democratic president. Key Obamites trained there. Core strategies and goals were polished there. Their success helped to spawn a third generation of think tanks who understood that to have real impact, good ideas had to be married (Read more…)

Left Over: A California Cautionary Tale…Served Dry

Drought-ravaged L.A. looking to ‘sponge up’ every bit of rainwater New storm drains built to let rainwater ‘piddle out’ into soil, $1B emergency plan to add more

By Kim Brunhuber, CBC News Posted: Mar 20, 2015 4:39 PM ET Last Updated: Mar 20, 2015 10:20 PM ET

 

Having grown up in SoCal, I can attest to the fact that it was either drought or semi drought when I lived there…and that was decades ago… LA was ‘created’ on what was essentially a desert, so no surprise here that this is going on..sometimes it didn’t rain for three years, (Read more…)