Scripturient: Council is privatizing our utilities

Collingwood council and its administration are planning to privatize both our water and electricity utilities. All, of course, without consulting you, the public. Some members of council have even stated – with a straight face, mind you – they would ask for your input at a later date. A date long after it’s too late ...

The Common Sense Canadian: Rafe: Site C Dam shows how broken our democracy is

BC First Nations Chiefs Roland Wilson, Liz Logan and Stewart Phillip took their anti-Site C message to Ottawa – to no avail (Liz Logan/ Twitter) This week I said I would talk about Site C but little did I know what I had taken on. I spent nearly a day and a half with stuff that ...

A Puff of Absurdity: Water as a Human Right

In a recent article in my local paper, Peter Shawn Taylor says that anyone who wants to stop Nestle from draining aquifers doesn’t understand economics and is hostile to capitalism. He implies that we can’t just label water a human right above the fray of the market without doing the same with food, clothes, and ...

PostArctica: Heron With Still Life

Taken at Parc des Rapides a few weeks ago.    

Cowichan Conversations: WTF is going on in the USA, and excuse me, Canada as well?

The Standing Mountain Sioux Nation have a treaty over the lands where the Dakota Access Pipeline (DPL) is approved to be built, yet the state of North Dakota police, national guard, and police forces Read more…

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jordan Brennan points out why Nova Scotia (and other jurisdictions) should move past austerity economics: The McNeil Liberals appear set to rack up budgetary surpluses through a strategy of public sector wage suppression. This is likely to backfire. It is an elementary insight of economic analysis that, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones highlights the toxic stress and other health problems borne disproportionately by members of the LGBT community who face systematic discrimination. And Tayla Smith and Jaitra Sathyandran discuss how temporary foreign workers (and others facing precarious work situations) tend to suffer preventable harm to their health ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Ellen Gould comments on how the CETA and other trade deals constrain democratic governance – and the fact that corporate bigwigs are threatening any government which considers giving effect to popular opposition doesn’t exactly provide any comfort. Meanwhile, Scott Sinclair points out the dangerous effects of the ...

Cowichan Conversations: Rick Mercer Rants About Nestle Taking Our Water

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Naomi Klein discusses how Canada’s longstanding – if far from inevitable – identity as a resource economy is standing in the way of both needed action on climate change and reconciliation with First Nations: In Canada, cultivation and industrialization were secondary. First and foremost, this country was ...

A Puff of Absurdity: Water Wars and the Last Straw

The next world wars won’t be about land or oil. They’ll be about water. And Canada could be the next Iraq, invaded and decimated for the abundance of our natural resources. We have to stop corporate control over our most necessary resource now before it all slips out of our hands. I watched Maude Barlow ...

The Common Sense Canadian: Justice for Peace Caravan tells Trudeau: Keep your promises to First Nations 

Members of the Treat 8 “Justice for the Peace” Caravan (Photo: Gary McNutt) Submitted by Andrea Palframan On September 12, the Federal Court of Appeal in Montreal will hear the latest legal challenge to the massive Site C hydroelectric dam already under construction on Treaty 8 territory in northeast British Columbia. First Nations community members from ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Brendan Duke examines the connection between wage growth and worker productivity, and makes the case that the former may lead to the latter: The 1929–1950 increase in wages was at first a result of several policies that directly raised workers’ wages, including the first federal minimum wage, the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Chris Hamby starts off what looks to be a must-read investigation on the effect of ISDS rules by discussing how they’re used to prevent governments from punishing corporate wrongdoing: (A)n 18-month BuzzFeed News investigation, spanning three continents and involving more than 200 interviews and tens of thousands ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Chris Hamby starts off what looks to be a must-read investigation on the effect of ISDS rules by discussing how they’re used to prevent governments from punishing corporate wrongdoing: (A)n 18-month BuzzFeed News investigation, spanning three continents and involving more than 200 interviews and tens of thousands ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Erika Hayasaki surveys the developing body of research on how poverty and deprivation affect a child’s long-term brain development: Early results show a troubling trend: Kids who grow up with higher levels of violence as a backdrop in their lives, based on MRI scans, have weaker real-time neural ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Erika Hayasaki surveys the developing body of research on how poverty and deprivation affect a child’s long-term brain development: Early results show a troubling trend: Kids who grow up with higher levels of violence as a backdrop in their lives, based on MRI scans, have weaker real-time neural ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on how the North Saskatchewan River oil spill may not lead directly to a needed reevaluation of the risks of pipelines – but a public expectation that we’ll shift away from dirty energy may be more significant in the long run. For further reading…– I’ve previously posted about Brad Wall’s response to ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: #PremierPipeline: Good Work Premier Brad Wall

“People are advised not to consume fish caught in the river, and to avoid water activities that may result in river water being ingested,” said a news release put out Tuesday morning. – six days later. “Good work Premier Brad Wall. No loss of life like at Lac Megantic oil tanker rail disaster. Naturally occurring ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: #PremierPipeline’s Slick Advice in Wake of Husky Oil Spill: Don’t Turn to Trains

Yah, who cares about contaminated water supplies for Sask citizens, as long as the oil industry is okay. https://t.co/RPoe5incfR #skpoli — Larry Hubich (@LHubich) July 23, 2016 @MeridianBooster here is what #PremierPipeline is talking about since yesterday – sports. pic.twitter.com/fhvqhHLcb3 — Saskboy (@saskboy) July 23, 2016 But one of the big issues for Brad Wall, ...

Things Are Good: No Need to Shower so Much

Showering is something that a lot of North Americans do everyday: and if you’re one of them then you should stop. Showering daily can actually do more harm to your health than good. So relax about your daily urge to cleanse and just roll with your micro biome! As we learn more about the relationship ...

Carbon49 – Sustainability for Canadian businesses: Nestlé Creating Shared Value Through Environmental Sustainability

Nestlé mark their 150th anniversary with key commitments to creating shared value in Canadian society. I look into their goals and progress as well as how their strategy of creating shared value differs from other corporate social responsibility programs. Found in Nestlé’s global report and Canadian report are their social commitments on nutrition, health and ...

Things Are Good: Happy World Oceans Day

The world’s oceans are incredibly important to the overall wellbeing of our planet. They absorb a lot of CO2 and harbour multiple ecosystems that we are still learning about. Despite the importance of the world’s oceans we often ignore their health. World Oceans Day is today and it’s a reminder how amazing these oceans are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Christopher Jencks discusses why the U.S.’ poor are only getting poorer (in part due to the misapprehension that social programs aren’t available) in reviewing Kathryn Edin and Luke Shaefer’s $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America: In $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in ...

Scripturient: Two conferences and a show

I had the honour and the enjoyment of attending two municipal conferences last week. While no longer directly involved in politics, I am able to keep my finger in some of the political pies through my current work for an NGO. Plus, I like to remain informed and up-to-date about politics and governance, and am always ...