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The Scott Ross: Public Education Before Health Care

When you replace the fan belt on your 1988 Toyota Corrolla, you can’t drive faster than when the car was brand new. Even with the new part, the car, with all of its wear and tear, is likely to be slower than when you first drove it off the lot.

No one expects that a trip to a mechanic for repairs is going to make their car better than new, we all know a mechanic only maintains a vehicle, he doesn’t engineer it to be better. When we want a faster, more efficient and more powerful car than the one (Read more…)

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: University Enrolment #nlpoli

Just for the sake of looking at some numbers, here are some statistics on university enrolment in Newfoundland and Labrador over the past decade.

The figures are from Statistics Canada.

(Read more…)

Carbon49 - Sustainability for Canadian businesses: How Small Green Team Can Transform Large Corporation

Small green teams tasked with transforming large corporations, governments, cities, and neighborhoods face some tough challenges. TD Bank’s three-person green team employed a range of strategies to inject sustainability thinking into 27,000 employees dispersed in 1,300 locations. I find four of their tactics very smart and can be readily adapted by green teams everywhere.

Green teams are often small. The three-person team at TD Bank, the second largest bank in Canada and sixth largest in North America, is not atypical. With limited resources, the team started an environmental employee engagement program in their U.S. operations just over a (Read more…)

Canadian Political Viewpoints: We Also Accept First-Born Children

Source: CBC News: Saskatchewan Tuition Increase Highest in CanadaSource: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives: Paul Gingrich: After the Freeze: Restoring University Affordability in Saskatchewan Source: Macleans OnCampus: Sask. NDP Commit to Tuition FreezeSource: Macleans OnCampus: Saskatchewan Party Pledges Affordability Source: News Talk 650: Wall Reacts to NDP Post Secondary PlatformSource: Saskatoon Homepage: UofS Salaries Questioned Ahead of Projected Deficit 

In a continuing trend for the government of Brad Wall, Saskatchewan’s tuition rates soared higher than a NASA based program for this academic year. Since removing the tuition freeze when first coming to power, the news of Saskatchewan’s (Read more…)

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Some inconvenient truths: goring some educational sacred cows #nlpoli

Friday turned out to be Post-Secondary Education Day with a post here on the impact of the freeze on tuition fees and a fascinating Telegram article on the Conservatives’ 2011 campaign pledge to replace student loans with needs-based grants.

Tuition was a bit of an issue in the 2001 provincial general election.  The Tory pledge is basically a variation on the New Democrat campaign platform plank in the same election to make wipe out tuition altogether. 

Supporters of the low or free tuition argument claim that by charging a tuition fee at all, “we are basically discriminating against poor people and the middle class.”  The Canadian Federation of Students likes the current tuition freeze and is loving up the idea of grants that would make tuition even cheaper or free.  The local rep commented in the Friday story that the Telegram that the current system “is the envy of . . . → Read More: The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Some inconvenient truths: goring some educational sacred cows #nlpoli

The Scott Ross: Canada Originally Intended All Education To Be Free

Out of Canada’s 33 Fathers of Confederation, only one went to university.1

It’s not that Nova Scotia’s Charles Tupper was the only intelligent one among them, other founders were businessmen, doctors, and lawyers, it’s that none of those jobs, and many others, did not require any post-secondary education.

The eduction jobs in the late 19th century did require was entirely made free shortly after confederation because provincial governments, though extremely small and limited, believed that their public schools should provide all the instruction necessary for citizens to obtain jobs in any sector, be it agriculture, engineering, manufacturing, commerce, medicine (Read more…)

mark a rayner | scribblings, squibs & sundry monkey joys: Ask General Kang: I may have inadvertently started an intergalactic war with the Bleugzag Imperium. Do you think this might be held against me when I apply for college?

Wow, good on ya! I’d hold this against you if you DIDN’T report it on your application. Starting an intergalactic war takes a great deal of organization, planning, and above all, unbridled enthusiasm. (Though that can get you into all … Continue reading →

The Political Road Map: The Great Academic Rejection of 2008-20??

……..

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20…..

Do you know what this is?

It is a count of the amount of days since my last job interview. A count that is used to monitor a continued hope that employment in my field or a career of some sort will be attainable under the current economy. As I have mentioned in previous entries, my current dilemma is the result of a University education. Look how I capitalize University, making it seem like this important, distinguished and enlightening experience. Well, the capitalization will now end, university is how it will remain forever.

I do not expect my university (Read more…)

The Scott Ross: Why Health Care Should Be Privatized

It would be a risky claim to suggest health care should be privatized while education, from preschool to post-secondary, should be fully publicly provided, but considering the importance of education, what’s really risky is that currently we have it the other way around.

To compare the importance of health care and education, ask yourself, would a nation that only had public health care be better off than one that only had public education?

Comparing such black and white societies may seem extreme, but it helps to clarify what is the more important public policy, health care or education. By the

. . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: Why Health Care Should Be Privatized

mark a rayner | scribblings, squibs & sundry monkey joys: Ask General Kang: Did I miss anything important in class yesterday?

How the hell would I know? I don’t even know what kind of class you’re taking! I do have a couple of ideas, though, if you should be worried about the class you missed yesterday, which I think is what … Continue reading →

The Liberal Scarf: Hudak would end support for students from low income families with attack on 30% tuition rebate

Tim Hudak rolled out his latest double down on right-wing policy, announcing he would end the 30% tuition rebate for Ontario post-secondary students.

Hudak and his post-secondary education critic, Rob Leone framed the tuition cut as not helping mature students or single parents (ironic, given the not so high regard single mothers have been held in historically by conservatives).

They also seem to want to restrict the way students could use the use any financial assistance they would receive:

“The Tories say student aid should be given to students who are getting good marks and can show they’re using the money

. . . → Read More: The Liberal Scarf: Hudak would end support for students from low income families with attack on 30% tuition rebate

The Scott Ross: Canada Has Moved Backwards On Education: Our Past Demands Free Post-Secondary

Canada 140 years ago was a more intolerant, sexist, and unequal place, but on one important issue it was far more progressive than the Canada of today, and that’s on public education.

Nations often like to look back and take pride at the progress they’ve made over the years, and Canada has a lot to be proud of, our country has moved forward on many important fronts, but in regards to education, it has not. In fact judged by the original intent of early Canadian governments, our education system has actually moved backwards.

This retrograde is not due to new

. . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: Canada Has Moved Backwards On Education: Our Past Demands Free Post-Secondary

Death By Trolley: A brave new world: Why moving beyond university can precipitate crisis

As students approach the completion of their university education some are excited to enter the “Real World”. Others are in no rush to “move on” – perhaps out of fear or uncertainty about their future, anticipatory nostalgia, or a keen awareness of what a uniquely special time the university years are.

University really can be a tremendously special time. Thousands of energetic, big-dreaming, hormone-charged, young adults for whom alcohol and pot are still exciting new adventures, all living away from home for the first time. An intellectual commune housed in a mixture of historic and state of the art buildings (Read more…)

Death By Trolley: The Grad School Gospels – Part 5: The University Graduate Entitlement Complex

The Grad School Gospels is a series of posts inspired by Dirk Hayhurst‘s The Bullpen Gospels. In the Bullpen Gospels, Hayhurst tells stories from his struggle to self-actualize through professional baseball. Inspired by Hayhurst and the many commonalities I noticed between the minor league track to the Majors, as he described it, and my experience in the grad school track to cognitive science professorship, I began the Grad School Gospels series.

In this, the fifth installment of The Grad School Gospels, I’ll be changing things up a bit. Firstly, this installment will not touch on professional baseball or Dirk

. . . → Read More: Death By Trolley: The Grad School Gospels – Part 5: The University Graduate Entitlement Complex

Death By Trolley: The Grad School Gospels – Part 3: Academe Can’t Be Your Everything

The Grad School Gospels is a series of posts inspired by Dirk Hayhurst‘s The Bullpen Gospels. In the Bullpen Gospels, Hayhurst tells stories from his struggle to self-actualize through professional baseball. Inspired by Hayhurst and the many commonalities I noticed between the minor league track to the Majors, as he described it, and my experience in the grad school track to cognitive science professorship, I began the Grad School Gospels series.

As with Part 2 – Passion, Fear and Indifference – the present installment was inspired by a set of quotes from Hayhurst. After a few disappointing seasons Dirk

. . . → Read More: Death By Trolley: The Grad School Gospels – Part 3: Academe Can’t Be Your Everything

Death By Trolley: The Grad School Gospels – Part 2: Passion, Fear and Indifference

In The Grad School Gospels: On Professional Baseball, Academia, and My Shared Experience with Dirk Hayhurst, I juxtaposed Hayhurst‘s pro baseball journey – which he recounts in his first book, The Bullpen Gospels – with my journey through academic psychology.

Several factors conspired to make our situations alike. We both laid most of our eggs in one basket, deriving identity, strength, purpose, livelihood and self-esteem from a single source. We were accustomed to success, praise and the ability to live indefinitely off of success in our chosen field. For a while this worked out swimmingly. Intrinsic passion and

. . . → Read More: Death By Trolley: The Grad School Gospels – Part 2: Passion, Fear and Indifference

The Progressive Economics Forum: Time to Rethink The Way We Fund Higher Education

This September, like every year, a new group of high school graduates headed to college or university to pursue higher education. But today’s generation of students is in for a very different experience from the ones their parents had.

On campuses across the country shiny new buildings are popping up, bearing corporate logos or the names of local philanthropists. But most of these are reserved for graduate schools of business, law or medicine, so today’s undergraduate arts and science students can expect to find their classes in the older buildings, often in varying states of disrepair. There, students will be

. . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Time to Rethink The Way We Fund Higher Education

Left Over: The Real Cost of Education

 

B.C. students warned to stick to budgets

Today in the CBC media, there’s an article admonishing students to stick to their tight budgets…this of course presupposes that students even have a clue what a “budget” is, never mind how to stick to one…

The author cites the cost of an undergrad degree at $ 77,000 for food, shelter and other expenses..I’m assuming that she, hopefully, is not including tuition in that amount, as well, but 77 thou seems hardly adequate , even if she is talking about on-campus housing.

Here’s some realistic advice from someone who went through

. . . → Read More: Left Over: The Real Cost of Education

The Scott Ross: Arguments For Free Post-Secondary Education

1. Free post-secondary education is a student loan that the country takes out and gets more money back than it ever put in. The government will receive more money from income taxes on the resulting increased salaries and wages of graduates than it spent on the initial investment for free higher education. (Compared to high school graduates, college graduates have a 21% higher income and university graduates have a 61% higher income.)

2. All other education is free because education is a public good. If high school is free, so should post-secondary education. Previously, other levels of

. . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: Arguments For Free Post-Secondary Education

The Scott Ross: Free Post-Secondary Education Is Bad Because You’re Afraid Of Change

You have a reason to oppose free post-secondary education? You sure do, it’s your unwillingness to change.

The fact is a majority of Canadians do offer justifications for opposing free post-secondary education, but those arguments do not come from research or evidence, they come from a fear of change.

This is clearly demonstrated in that a majority of Canadians also oppose the elimination of public schools, not because they’ve looked at studies or read reports, but that moving to an entirely private school system would be too big of a change. 

And now most Canadians, the same ones that

. . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: Free Post-Secondary Education Is Bad Because You’re Afraid Of Change

The Progressive Economics Forum: Seven reasons why you should support the Quebec students’ call for low tuition fees

Despite the remarkably poor media coverage of the early days of the protests (especially in English Canada), it seems that the Quebec student protestors have finally succeeded in sparking a broader public discussion about civil liberties and the right to protest (even in the Globe here, here and in the Celebrity Photo captions).

Yet, media commentators have largely dismissed the reason that first brought students out to the streets — the demand for low tuition fees — as an unrealistic gripe of entitled middle- and upper-class children trying to protect their unfair privilege (lowest tuition fees in the

. . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Seven reasons why you should support the Quebec students’ call for low tuition fees

Song of the Watermelon: The Forgotten Issues of Quebec’s Student Strike

The ongoing three-month strike by Quebec university students over tuition increases has sparked near-unanimous outrage from members of Canada’s mainstream commentariat — and not just over the violence, but over the very content of what students are demanding.

What do these spoiled rich kids have to protest, the pundits wail, when already they pay the lowest tuition in Canada, and Canadian tuition in general is but a fraction of that in the United States? They are unrealistic. They feel entitled. In Andrew Coyne’s words: “The student leaders, at this point, are absolutely delusional in their sense of their

. . . → Read More: Song of the Watermelon: The Forgotten Issues of Quebec’s Student Strike

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Tuition Fees and University Participation #nlpoli

The connection between tuition fees and university participation was big subject in the summer run-up to the general election and then in the general election  last fall.

Just to give some additional food for thought on that topic, here are a couple of slices from a study done in September 2011 by the Frontier Centre for Public Policy.

Some observations from the study (page 11):

The data show that university participation for 23 year olds from low-income families was lower in Quebec and Newfoundland, the two lowest-tuition provinces, than in any other province. Manitoba, the remaining low-tuition province, had a . . . → Read More: The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Tuition Fees and University Participation #nlpoli

eaves.ca: How Architecture Made SFU Vancouver’s University

For those unfamiliar with Vancouver, it is a city that enjoys a healthy one way rivalry between two university: the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Simon Fraser University (SFU). Growing up here I didn’t think much of Simon Fraser. I don’t mean that in a disparaging way, I mean it literally. SFU was simply [...] . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: How Architecture Made SFU Vancouver’s University

Geoff at Mount Allison: 20 Tips for first-year students: #13- Explore the natural beauty surrounding Mount Allison University

In the 13th video in our 20-part video tip series, third-year biology student David Summerby-Murray discusses places to see outside Sackville. He mentions the Tantramar Salt Marshes, just outside Sackville (part of why Canon Envirothon came to Mou… . . . → Read More: Geoff at Mount Allison: 20 Tips for first-year students: #13- Explore the natural beauty surrounding Mount Allison University