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The Canadian Progressive: Gaza Conflict: Canadian man wants Harper charged with inciting genocide

A Newfoundland man says PM Harper and Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird should be charged under Canada’s Criminal Code for inciting “genocide” in Gaza.

The post Gaza Conflict: Canadian man wants Harper charged with inciting genocide appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Alberta Diary: Climate change divestment movement gains ground in church – but not in Canadian media or political circles

Ho-hum… Some typical Canadian reporters, hard at work … Actual Canadian newsrooms may not appear exactly as illustrated. Below: Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Is he more influential than we imagined in Alberta?

CALGARY

When retired South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu visited Alberta’s Tarpatch capital of Fort McMurray last month and called the output from bitumen mining “filth,” the commentary here in Alberta was pretty predictable.

The right-wing rage machine creaked briefly to life, complained bitterly about celebrities who don’t know what they’re talking about just passing through, and then moved on to other complaints.

About the kindest thing said about (Read more…)

Bill Longstaff: Today is the International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers

Fifty-eight years ago, one of Canada’s most honourable contributions to the international community was born. The first armed UN peacekeeping mission, an emergency force formed to deal with the Suez crisis, was created, largely due to the efforts of then Canadian Minister of External Affairs Lester B. Pearson. Pearson was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts.

In 2002, the United

Alberta Diary: Alison Redford set to sue Alberta Government for wrongful dismissal

The $45,000 Question: How could they put Alison Redford on probation … and then not give her a chance to shape up?

Former premier Alison Redford intends to sue the government of Alberta for wrongful dismissal.

The former premier believes that because she was given a “work plan” by the leadership of the province’s Progressive Conservative government and then forced to step aside before actually having a chance to prove she could do the job as set out in the plan her lawsuit has a strong chance of success, said a spokesperson for the former premier.

“The ‘work plan’ was (Read more…)

Alberta Diary: Ted Cruz: For God (& country’s) sake, talk to Conrad Black before you shred your Canadian passport!

Canada or USA? USA or Canada? Texas Senator Ted Cruz, visible between the signs, ponders what he should do. Actual Tea Party favourites may not appear exactly as illustrated. Below: Mr. Cruz waves bye-bye to his fellow Canadians … maybe; Lord Black of Crossharbour.

It’s said here that Calgary native Ted Cruise needs to make an appointment to have a serious chat with Conrad Black before he makes any rash and irrevocable decisions to run his Canadian passport through the shredder.

Mr. Cruz is now the junior Senator from Texas and a favourite of the Tea Party, a group that (Read more…)

Cowichan Conversations: UN Report Says Small-Scale Organic Farming Only Way to Feed the World

Richard Hughes-Political Blogger

It could be done individually and co-operatively in a great many locations such as the Cowichan Valley.

Organic Gardening – Farming, should become an integral part of our children’s education with training and hands on learning experiences from primary onwards.

Skilled gardener/farmer teachers could be brought in to lead in the development of workable programs. Such an approach could go a long way in helping to provide the tools and knowledge that will be needed for future generations.

The Cowichan Green Community is an excellent source and resource. They already play an important role in this regard (Read more…)

Akaash Maharaj - Practical Idealism: Akaash Maharaj – News: Corruption Declared a Crime Against Humanity

Reuters reports on our efforts at the United Nations: There are some forms of corruption so grave, whose effects on human life, human rights, and human welfare are so catastrophic, that they should shock the conscience of the international community and mobilise the will of nations to act across borders. They are Crimes Against Humanity, and should be prosecuted in the highest national and international courts.

Akaash Maharaj - Practical Idealism: Akaash Maharaj – Huffington Post: The True Cost of Political Corruption

Every year, political corruption kills 140 000 children across the world, by depriving them of food, water, and medical care. My GOPAC parliamentary colleagues and I are at the United Nations UNCAC to bring the worst offenders before the bar of international law.

Akaash Maharaj - Practical Idealism: Akaash Maharaj: Fighting a Crime Against Humanity

My Huffington Post article: Political corruption kills 140 000 children annually, by depriving them of medical care, food, and water. Yet, far too often, the perpetrators of the most outrageous acts of corruption are able to use their illicit wealth and power to pervert the very laws and institutions that should call them to account. This past week, my GOPAC colleagues and I presented the United Nations UNCAC with a plan to bring them to justice.

wRanter.com: A clear message to the world

FB.Event.subscribe(‘edge.create’, function(response) { _gaq.push(['_trackEvent','SocialSharing','Facebook - like button',unescape(String(response).replace(/\+/g, " "))]); }); Share this: Regardless of one’s political predilections, one’s attitude toward the policies of Israel’s current government, or one’s view of Benjamin Netanyahu’s strengths and weaknesses as a retail politician, one has to admire the Israeli prime minister’s ability to make his point. His speech before the United Nations General Assembly in 2012 will long be […]

The Canadian Progressive: CHRC statement on meeting with UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, James Anaya

Canadian Human Rights Commission statement on meeting with James Anaya, the visiting United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

The post CHRC statement on meeting with UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, James Anaya appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Cracked Crystal Ball II: Harper Continues To Isolate Canada

With Harper and his band of geniuses running around the UN this, it’s actually been kind of interesting.  As I pointed out back in May, Harper’s foreign policy has served primarily to isolate Canada on the world stage, and continue the far-right narrative about the “irrelevance” of the United Nations. Today, in what must be a first in history, Canada refused to sign a UN treaty which the US agreed to sign.   Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird has said there is a potential link between signing on to the treaty and Canada’s now-abolished long gun registry. Baird’s (Read more…)

Montreal Simon: The Incredible Shrinking Steve Harper

Golly. If Stephen Harper's stature on the world stage keeps shrinking we're going to have to swap that magnifying glass for a microscope eh? Yesterday we found out how low he has sunk. When the New York Times accused him of muzzling scientists in a monstrous attempt to "guarantee public ignorance."Today we found out how small he has shrunk. Read more »

drive-by planet: Ecuador’s Ricardo Patiño on Latin American resistance to NSA spying, influence of Castro and Chavez

In this Democracy Now interview, Ecuadorean Foreign Minister, Ricardo Patiño, addresses a range of topics in discussion with Amy Goodman.

In reference to NSA spying Patiño said “Edward Snowden opened the eyes of the world to an international crime. The NSA is spying on the whole world and that’s a violation of international law. Furthermore, it doesn’t just violate international law, it violates international trust.”

NSA spying has caused significant diplomatic fall-out. Brazilian president, Dilma Rousseff, has cancelled her upcoming state visit to Washington to protest NSA spying directed at targets in Brazil. She described it as “a (Read more…)

Song of the Watermelon: A Q&A on Syria and the “Responsibility to Protect”

What is “Responsibility to Protect”?

“Responsibility to Protect,” or R2P, is a doctrine that grew out of a 2001 report by the Canadian-established International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty (ICISS). Unanimously endorsed as a general principle by the UN General Assembly four years later, R2P carries a hefty moral (though not legal) weight. The doctrine holds that it is the responsibility of nation states to protect their populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing, and crimes against humanity, and that if they prove unwilling or unable to do so, responsibility falls on the international community. As a last resort, (Read more…)

Carbon49 - Sustainability for Canadian businesses: Employee Engagement Drives Sustainability Strategy

Have you considered how employee engagement can drive your sustainability strategy and how you can leverage sustainability initiatives to engage your employees and create a values-driven culture of collaboration and creativity? Let’s look into how Hewlett-Packard and Cadbury Schweppes do it, and how WWF can help.

While the majority of employees fall under the umbrella of not engaged (emotionally detached) and actively disengaged (negatively view the workplace), few companies even know how to engage their employees in social and environmental sustainability. The 2011 Employee Engagement Report by BlessingWhite Research (PDF) found that fewer than 1 in 3 employees worldwide (31%) are (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: UN Report Highlights Violence Against Indigenous Women in Canada, Says Human Rights Watch

Opportunity for Action to End Violence Against Indigenous Women, Girls By: Human Rights Watch | Press Release: (Edited by Obert Madondo) TORONTO, April 30, 2013 – The United Nations Human Rights Council adopted today…

The post UN Report Highlights Violence Against Indigenous Women in Canada, Says Human Rights Watch appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

- Lori Theresa Waller provides her own take on the Canadian Foundation for Labour Rights’ study on labour rights and inequality: In the 1970s, all provinces used the simple card check system, whereby an employer must legally recognize a union if the majority of workers sign membership cards. Since then, B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario and Nova Scotia have moved to requiring that workplaces also hold a vote before the union will be legally recognized.

…Studies have found that the additional requirement of holding a vote decreases the success of union organizing drives

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive | News & Analysis: Sunday Roundup: Harper Picked Chinese Pandas Over Journey of Nishiyuu Aboriginal Youth

By: Obert Madondo | The Canadian Progressive: This week six courageous “Journey of Nishiyuu” Aboriginal youth arrived in Ottawa after walking 1 600 kilometres from Whapmagoostui on Hudson Bay in northern Quebec. They’d hoped to meet with Prime Minister Stephen Harper. In a gesture like to further galvanize the popular view that Harper [...]

The post Sunday Roundup: Harper Picked Chinese Pandas Over Journey of Nishiyuu Aboriginal Youth appeared first on The Canadian Progressive | News & Analysis.

The Canadian Progressive: Chief Spence takes fight against Harper government’s Bill C-45 to UN

Chief Theresa Spence, Mushkegowuk People of Attawapiskat First Nation and the International Indian Treaty Council file urgent “Action Request” with U.N. human rights body By Obert Madondo | The Canadian Progressive, Feb. 25, 2013: Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence hasn’t given up her fight against Prime Minister Stephen Harper‘s draconian omnibus Bills C-45 and C-38. On Jan. 24, she ended READ MORE

Cowichan Conversations: It Is Time For Ottawa To Become ‘Idle No More’

Richard Hughes Political Blogger

The Idle No More Movement has reopened an old problem and kicked off a new discussion in Canada regarding our relationship and responsibilities towards indigenous peoples. While it is easy to pick up on PM Harper’s desperate and racist wedge attack on Chief Theresa Spence and the Attawapiskat Nation we must take deep breaths and get down to the reality of the situation. This cuts both ways.

The chartered accountants facts and figures do not factor in the abuse of native peoples through forced day and residential schools. The horrific reality that native parents faced while

. . . → Read More: Cowichan Conversations: It Is Time For Ottawa To Become ‘Idle No More’

Cowichan Conversations: Encana and Alberta Facing A Multi Million Dollar Lawsuit Over Fracking Damages

Richard Hughes PoliticalBlogger

Energy Giant Encana met a woman who was not about to be pushed around by industry or compliant government regulators. Landowner Jessica Ernst has launched a Multi-million dollar lawsuit against the EnCana and Alberta government regulators over water contamination.

Jessica Ernst is also telling her story to the United Nations in New York.

The outcome of this case could have far reaching ramifications for the residents and natural gas industry.

We have been lied to by Natural Gas Frackers from the get-go and residents have suffered the results of this dubious practice. Information 0f legal actions

. . . → Read More: Cowichan Conversations: Encana and Alberta Facing A Multi Million Dollar Lawsuit Over Fracking Damages

The Canadian Progressive: Chief Theresa Spence Ends 43-Day Hunger Strike With Declaration “Towards Fundamental Change”

by Guest Blogger | The Canadian Progressive, Jan 25, 2013 Attawapiskat First Nation Chief Theresa Spence signed the First Nations declaration that ended her 43-day hunger strike at Ottawa’s Victoria Island . The 13-point declaration, entitled “First Nations: Working Towards Fundamental Change”, was signed jointly with First Nations leaders and Canada’s federal opposition parties. As The Canadian Progressive publisher, READ MORE

The Canadian Progressive: Canada’s Human Rights Reputation is Fast Becoming a Myth

by Ontario Federation of Labour: This year, as the global community recognizes December 10 as International Human Rights Day, many Canadians struggle with a vanishing sense of pride in Canada’s once renowned reputation as a leader in human rights. While that reputation has always been contradicted by the lived experiences of Canada’s Aboriginal peoples and READ MORE