Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mission accomplished (iv)

Four professors involved in researching income inequality in Canada took a close look at the National Household Survey and what it appeared to tell us, and then put it into context. According to the NHS, many of the census tracts where low-income people live have seen their average incomes rise, while the highest-income census tracts ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mission accomplished (iii): Collateral damage

I’m prepared to believe that when Tony Clement eliminated the manadatory long census form prior to the 2011 census, he didn’t actually intend to make rural communities in the western provinces disappear. After all, rural communities in the west would be a big part of the CPC’s base of support. But when you implement a ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mission accomplished (ii)

Hamilton neighbourhoods vanishing from new ‘census’ The death of the long-form census has left Hamilton full of “black holes” of neighbourhood data, leaving out many of its poorest areas. According to a new report from the Social Planning and Research Council, that could lead to bad policy choices and inappropriate spending that won’t help the ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mission accomplished

Toby Sanger has a post up at The Progressive Economics Forum discussing the effects of changes the Harper government made to the census. Specifically, the Conservatives eliminated the mandatory census long form and substituted a voluntary National Household Survey despite the warnings of, well, pretty much everyone who knows anything about statistics that the change ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Way past normal

Back in February, the Globe and Mail reported on a memo from the Treasury Board to “all federal departments and agencies” instructing them to omit details of spending cuts from reports that were to be published in May. “Please note that departments and agencies are not to report the results of the strategic operating review ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Transparency ‘R’nt Us

Here’s a pair of media reports about the federal government that suggest an ongoing problem is about to get even worse. Yesterday the Ottawa Citizen reported on comments from John McCallum, the Liberal finance critic, who drew attention to the lack of details the Conservatives have provided on previous “strategic reviews”, which is the euphemism ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Wanker of the day

Lorne Gunter, whose National Post column on the census is thoroughly dissected at Calgary Grit. Incidentally, should Tony Clement pop up to claim vindication since Statistics Canada has released the first set of results from the recent census today, feel free to remind him that the population data we’re getting right now is based on ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: There seems to be a difference of opinion here

This is Tony Clement, after citing some numbers plucked out of context: So clearly [Old Age Security] is unsustainable… One wonders where Clement gets his information. It’s certainly not from the Parliamentary Budget Officer. The oncoming demographic time bomb of baby boomers retiring won’t cause a fiscal crisis Canada’s budget watchdog said Wednesday, despite the ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Yesterday in Gutter Politics

As reported here at the CBC, a veteran public servant has tendered his resignation in protest. Michel Dorais, a member of the audit committee that oversees the Office of the Auditor General, has resigned his position because of the government’s appointment of a unilingual AG in contradiction of the government’s own published job requirements. “the ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mostly competent government

You may remember — and if you don’t, this article will remind you — that not too long ago Tony Clement and Rona Ambrose stood on a stage together and announced with great fanfare the formation of Shared Services Canada. This new agency was to drive a complete reorganization of the federal government’s information technology ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Why not just have the Americans write our legislation for us?

Michael Geist in today’s Toronto Star: Secret U.S. government cables show a stunning willingness by senior Canadian officials to appease American demands for a U.S.-style copyright law here. The documents describe Canadian officials as encouraging American lobbying efforts. They also cite cabinet minister Maxime Bernier raising the possibility of showing U.S. officials a draft bill ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Has anyone spoken to John Baird lately?

In the immediate aftermath of the Auditor General’s report on G8 spending, we were assured that while the attention to administrative detail was lacking, there was certainly no intention to mislead parliament. We were also assured that while Tony Clement was heavily involved in considering all the projects in his riding, it was John Baird ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mostly competent government

Government cost-cutting agency has no business plan OTTAWA — The Conservative government has no business plan for its newest agency despite promising it will save taxpayers between $100 million and $200 million annually through streamlining the federal information technology strategy. And as of Monday, Public Works, which assumed responsibility for the new agency, couldn’t explain ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mostly competent government

It’s been almost exactly a year since then Industry Minister Tony Clement announced that the census long form would no longer be mandatory. Among the lies he told us at the time was that the government would work hard to ensure that the new, voluntary household survey would be a suitable replacement. So how’s that ...

Thus Prate the Pundit » Social Critique: Conservatives to Ignore the Canadian Copyright Consultation in Favour of DMCA?

The Conservatives still appear to be steering Canada toward a DMCA-like future: one that enslaves our culture to a few controlling (mostly foreign) companies, stifles science and freedom of expression, and anchors Canada’s economy to the digital dark age rather than propelling it toward what could be an incredibly innovative and lucrative future on the ...