Politics and its Discontents: Why A Tax On Financial Transactions Makes Sense

Robert Reich, for whom I have a great deal of respect, offers this succinct explanation: You can read more about this issue, also often referred to as the Tobin tax, here. Recommend this Post

Politics and its Discontents: Why A Tax On Financial Transactions Makes Sense

Robert Reich, for whom I have a great deal of respect, offers this succinct explanation: You can read more about this issue, also often referred to as the Tobin tax, here. Recommend this Post

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Michael Wasser comments on the importance of unions – and the need to ensure that corporate-dominated politics don’t stand in the way of worker organization. And Ben Sichel rightly argues that Ontario’s widespread violations of employment standards demonstrate the need for unions to protect workers’ rights even ...

Politics and its Discontents: Thinking Beyond The Conventional

We are regularly told, both by governments and their corporate confederates, that these are tough times, and that only patience and a freer hand for business will bring about eventual relief. To the seasoned observer, such a prescription is utter nonsense, of course. Neither an expansion in good-paying jobs nor a contraction of the income ...

Politics and its Discontents: The ‘Robin-Hood Tax’ Gains Traction

In a declaration that will likely earn him the designation ‘Enemy of the Capitalist State,’ Pope Francis recently called upon the world to redistribute its wealth in order to reduce what is likely the greatest socio-economic scourge of our times, income inequality. In his address to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and other U.N. leaders, the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Stephen Beer argues that the UK’s Labour Party should take the lead in arguing for a financial transactions tax oriented toward reducing inequality: The banking sector is incorrigible. It cannot alone reform itself or repair its relationship with the rest of society. For example, just before his ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Paul Adams highlights how the Cons and their anti-social allies have spent decades trying to convince Canadians that it’s not worth trying to pursue the goals we value – and how the main challenge for progressives is to make the case that a better future is possible: This ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jeffrey Simpson rightly notes that Alberta (like other resource-heavy jurisdictions) should be trying to diversify its revenue sources and economic development instead of relying on the one-time sale of publicly-owned resources to pay the bills. And Robyn Allan points out why we shouldn’t let oil barons pretend ...

Politics and its Discontents: Reflections from Cuba – Civic Responsibility

January 23, 2013: In a previous post, I compared and contrasted Cuba and Canada in terms of the opportunities for achieving one’s potential through access to information, ideas, etc., noting that in Cuba the opportunities are almost non-existent, while sadly, in our country, there are those who choose not to avail themselves of the almost ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Stephen Kimber makes the case for a financial transactions tax in Atlantic Business: (W)hat can supposedly sovereign nations do when individual governments seem powerless in the face of rampant globalization and footloose capital? Well, they could get together to create an international public counter-balance to out-of-whack corporate ...

Bill Longstaff: France embraces Robin Hood tax

On August 1st, France introduced its long-promised Financial Transactions Tax (FTT). Popularly referred to as a Robin Hood Tax, or Tobin Tax, the 0.2 per cent levy will apply to sales of publicly traded shares, including credit default swaps, of businesses with a market value of over €1-billion. Ten other European countries, include Germany, Italy ...

CuriosityCat: President Hollande of France leads the way with a Tobin tax

At last we see a serious move in Europe to start the much needed process of reining in the many useless financial transactions that are part of the unregulated morass that landed us in the 2008 financial meltdown. James Tobin Hollande’s first budget is introducing a Tobin tax on trading and swap transactions: The 0.2 ...