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Alberta Politics: Is there enough Orange Wave left in Alberta to propel more Dippers to Ottawa?

ILLUSTRATIONS: A typical Alberta conservative voter, with orange hair, flirts with NDP leader Thomas Mulcair while Prime Minister Stephan Harper, in the background, tries to warn her to stop. Actual Alberta political figures may not appear exactly as illustrated. With apologies to Normal Rockwell. Below: Alberta political commentator Duane Bratt. Could there be enough momentum […]

The post Is there enough Orange Wave left in Alberta to propel more Dippers to Ottawa? appeared first on Alberta Politics.

Alberta Politics: Craig B. Chandler: He’s baaaack (in Ontario)! And he’s gonna get Linda McQuaig … elected!

PHOTOS: A screen grab of Craig B. Chandler telling immigrants to Alberta to vote Conservative or get lost back in 2007. Below: NDP Toronto Centre candidate Linda McQuaig. Brace yourselves, Toronto! Craig B. Chandler’s heading your way to campaign against Linda McQuaig, the NDP’s candidate in the Toronto Centre riding, who is notorious here in […]

The post Craig B. Chandler: He’s baaaack (in Ontario)! And he’s gonna get Linda McQuaig … elected! appeared first on Alberta Politics.

The Canadian Progressive: Mulcair asks voters to fire Harper over Duffy scandal

During the 2015 federal election on October 19, Canadians should use the power of the vote to fire Stephen Harper over the Mike Duffy scandal, says NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair.

The post Mulcair asks voters to fire Harper over Duffy scandal appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: On veto points

I’ll follow up on this post by once again discussing another area where individuals’ past comments are being treated as a basis for general exclusion. And the subject is particularly sensitive the midst of an election campaign – particularly in light of the issue where it’s surfacing.

As in the case of judicial appointments, the starting point should be that past comments offer a reasonable basis for rejecting political candidates only if they meaningfully signal some general unsuitability for their anticipated future role (in this case representing constituents as a party’s MP), not merely because they differ from one’s preferred (Read more…)

Pushed to the Left and Loving It: Ignorance and Belly Badges: Learning to Deal With the Doltish

Recently the media and political opponents made merry with a comment that Justin Trudeau made on the economy.

“We’re proposing a strong and real plan one that invests in the middle class so that we can grow the economy, not from the top down the way Mr. Harper wants to, but from the heart outwards, that is what Canada has always done well with.”

For anyone who got past grade two, they know that the “heart” is also used to reference the core, or centre.  So what Justin Trudeau was saying is that rather than give money to the (Read more…)

Pushed to the Left and Loving It: Canada’s Domestic False Flag War Has Many Fronts

“Why of course the people don’t want war … But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship … Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy.  All you have to do is to tell them they are being attacked,  and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger.” — Hermann Goering, Nazi leader, (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Asked and answered

The problem with basing a party’s rhetoric on theories which can be directly and obviously disproven by events beyond their control is that events happen.

With that in mind, over to you, people whinging about the candidates for Finance Minister under an NDP government: The NDP Leader also announced that Toronto resident and former Saskatchewan Finance Minister, Andrew Thomson, will run for the Party against Conservative Finance Minister, Joe Oliver.

“Andrew has the experience and strong fiscal record that Canada needs to get the economy on track and create greater opportunity for the middle class. I am very pleased (Read more…)

Pushed to the Left and Loving It: Guest Blogger: NDP PLAYING A DANGEROUS GAME OF FOOTSIES WITH QUEBEC SEPARATISM:

By Ted Chartrand

I have, by and large, stayed away from criticizing the NDP but it’s at the point where I cannot remain silent. The NDP is playing a very dangerous game by pandering to the separatist element in Quebec. It’s doing this in two ways: 1. The Sherbrooke Declaration: The Sherbrooke Declaration is long-standing NDP policy which concludes that Quebec has the green light for separation with a 50%+1 vote on a future sovereignty referendum. This is contrary to the Supreme Court ruling on this issue. In fact, the NDP platform includes a commitment to repeal the Clarity Act, which (Read more…) . . . → Read More: Pushed to the Left and Loving It: Guest Blogger: NDP PLAYING A DANGEROUS GAME OF FOOTSIES WITH QUEBEC SEPARATISM:

Pushed to the Left and Loving It: Mulcair’s Environmental Record #1: Have the NDP Sprung a Leak?

On August 25,  1988;  then federal Minister of the Environment, Tom McMillan, tabled Bill C-156, in the House of Commons:  the Canada Water Preservation Act The reason for the bill was to give teeth to an announcement made the year before, by the Mulroney government, that they would not consider large-scale water exports from Canada.   Unfortunately an election was called on October 1, 1988, and the bill died on the Order Paper. In my opinion, Canada has had three very good environmental ministers; two Conservative: Tom McMillan and Jean Charest; and one Liberal, Stephane Dion. McMillan was not only known for (Read more…) . . . → Read More: Pushed to the Left and Loving It: Mulcair’s Environmental Record #1: Have the NDP Sprung a Leak?

Accidental Deliberations: On cooperative options

I’ve previously excoriated the Libs for the connection between their refusal to talk about cooperation with other parties and their complete lack of any idea what they supposedly stand for. And nothing in the campaign to date changes that analysis.

By the same token, I’ll give credit where due to Elizabeth May for being up-front about her test for support for a new government. And it’s particularly noteworthy that the conditions – most notably the repeal, rather than tweaking, of C-51 – are ones which the NDP will be far better positioned to meet than any other potential governing party.

(Read more…)

CuriosityCat: Linda McQuaig’s nettle gift to Tom Mulcair

About to grasp the McQuaig nettle?

One of the NDP’s prize candidates has opened a can of worms that Mulcair wishes was not opened.

Here’s one report on what Mulcair said, trying to douse the flames (note the part I have bolded and reddened):

He pledged that an NDP government would bring in sustainable development legislation, including a polluter pay system where companies that damage the environment are responsible for cleanup costs. Environmental assessments would also include an analysis of whether or not the project allows Canada to meet internationally agreed upon targets for greenhouse gas reductions, he added. (Read more…) . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Linda McQuaig’s nettle gift to Tom Mulcair

Pushed to the Left and Loving It: The NDP’s Biggest Asset May be Their Biggest Liability

I watched the Macleans leadership debates again on Youtube, and noticed a few things that I hadn’t picked up on when watching it live. For one thing, Thomas Mulcair was the only one of the four to have to use a script, when delivering his closing remarks.  We saw one awkward moment when he had to turn the page and forgot where he was.He did get some very good points across during the debate, and was even able to trick Harper into admitting that we were in a recession.  But overall, his performance was weak, especially since everyone thought (Read more…)

. . . → Read More: Pushed to the Left and Loving It: The NDP’s Biggest Asset May be Their Biggest Liability

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

- Crawford Kilian reviews Tom Mulcair’s Strength of Conviction and describes what we can expect out of an NDP federal government as a result: He seems likely to be a very pro-family PM, if only because his own family clearly shaped him that way. (His account of courting and marrying Catherine Pinhas is a lovely, funny slice of social history.) So expect affordable daycare to be in his first budget; but if once-housebound mums then flood into the job market, he may find unemployment rates even higher than they are now.

Also expect (Read more…)

Susan on the Soapbox: The Leaders Debate: No One Won And Why It Doesn’t Matter

Tempting though it may be for those of us in the peanut gallery to rattle on about who won and who flopped in the Leaders Debate, the really important question is this: did we learn anything new about the men who would be king, er, prime minister?

A healthy economy?

Everyone but Harper agrees that Canada is in a recession. The fact is Harper ran up eight consecutive deficits and we’re $150 billion in debt.

Harper says our economy is healthy. Just look at the Stats Canada numbers—Canada created more net new jobs than any other G7 country. And (Read more…)

Alberta Politics: When propaganda becomes memory: Pierre Trudeau and the National Energy Program

PHOTOS: Pierre and Justin Trudeau back in the day, with possibly quite a few Liberal supporters in the background. Below: Prime Minister Steve and Defence Minister Jason Kenney. Everybody in Alberta knows Pierre Trudeau and his National Energy Program laid waste to Alberta in the 1980s, and that would include plenty of people out here […]

The post When propaganda becomes memory: Pierre Trudeau and the National Energy Program appeared first on Alberta Politics.

The Canadian Progressive: B.C. residents choose Mulcair as prime minister in post-debate poll

British Columbians polled just after last Thursday’s Maclean’s leaders debate would pick NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair for Canada’s next Prime Minister.

The post B.C. residents choose Mulcair as prime minister in post-debate poll appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Alberta Politics: No losers except Canadians in last night’s ditchwater-dull debate

PHOTOS: Zzzzzzzzz … Why are these men smiling? Below: Prime Minister Stephen Harper, sneering; Opposition Leader Thomas Mulcair, smiling unnervingly; Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, doing his best to look pugnacious; Green Party Leader Elizabeth May, happy to be there. Opposition Leader Thomas Mulcair stayed calm, smiled and looked prime ministerial during last night’s “national” televised […]

The post No losers except Canadians in last night’s ditchwater-dull debate appeared first on Alberta Politics.

Pushed to the Left and Loving It: How Thomas Mulcair Dashed the Hopes of Millions of Canadians

On July 17, 1996,  Bill C-35 came into effect, which redefined the federal minimum wage to be the adult minimum wage, in the provinces where the work was performed; by those employed in industries that fell under federal jurisdiction.At the time, federal minimum wage was just $4.00 an hour, while in B.C.,  for instance, it was $7.00 an hour.  Bill C-35 allowed federal workers to be paid the same as their provincial counterparts.The Bill received the full support of the Bloc and NDP.  Only the Reform Party opposed, wanting instead to just lower taxes.One name appearing on (Read more…)

. . . → Read More: Pushed to the Left and Loving It: How Thomas Mulcair Dashed the Hopes of Millions of Canadians

Accidental Deliberations: And the verdict is…

Having set out my criteria for watching tonight’s leaders’ debate in today’s column, I’ll offer a quick rundown as to my evaluation.

Justin Trudeau was by far the weakest of the lot in terms of both depth and flexibility of thought from the very beginning, answering Paul Wells’ question about whether he could do more than what was in his party’s economic platform by merely reciting talking points about the exact plan which was being challenged. And matters didn’t improve for Trudeau throughout: at best he was aware enough to find allies among the other leaders on some points, (Read more…)

Alberta Politics: Is it good news or bad news for the Conservatives if Stephen Harper trumps Trump tonight?

PHOTOS: Stephen Harper, as imagined during tonight’s TV debate. (Photo of Donald Trump by Gage Skidmore.) Below: The real Mr. Harper and another shot of the real Mr. Trump. Now, about that debate tonight, the big question has to be whether it will help the Conservatives or hurt them when Canadian voters tune into the […]

The post Is it good news or bad news for the Conservatives if Stephen Harper trumps Trump tonight? appeared first on Alberta Politics.

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, with my suggestions as to what viewers should watch for in tonight’s leaders’ debate – particularly in a campaign where we’ll have ample opportunity to see everything but interaction between party leaders.

For further reading…- David Reevely describes the staging behind most of the campaign events we’ll see between now and election day. And Scott Reid takes a look at the preparation which goes into each debate as well.- Macleans offers a primer on tonight’s debate. And Aaron Wherry, Bruce Anderson, Laura Payton, and Chantal Hebert all note a few additional points to (Read more…)

Pushed to the Left and Loving It: How We Are Helping Stephen Harper Destroy Our Democracy

This year, the Organization for Security and Economic Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), will be sending a delegation to Canada to monitor our upcoming election. This is primarily in response to sweeping changes to our electoral system, as a result of the Conservative’s so-called Fair Elections Act.

Those concerns include: whether the law will prevent large numbers of voters from actually casting their ballots; whether campaign finance rules will benefit some parties and not others; the process for complaints and appeals; and whether the law negatively affects turnout among aboriginals and other groups.

We know that the Harper Conservatives have cheated in (Read more…) . . . → Read More: Pushed to the Left and Loving It: How We Are Helping Stephen Harper Destroy Our Democracy

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Michael Hiltzik discusses how corporate apologists are trying (but failing) to minimize the existence and importance of income inequality. Lawrence Martin notes that the rest of Canada’s economic indicators are similarly signalling that Conservative dogma is of absolutely no use in the real world. And Michael Geist observes that among the new “caretaker” rules is a provision allowing the Cons to keep trying to inflict the TPP as their parting shot at Canada even if their election plans are going nowhere.

- Michael Harris points out just a few of the whoppers which (Read more…)

Pushed to the Left and Loving It: Why Mulcair Could Be in Trouble Over Bill C-51

I think by now most people realize that the NDP stance on Bill C-51 was crafted to make Justin Trudeau look bad.

Before their vocal opposition, Mulcair had not yet decided how to handle the bill.  In fact, he told Tom Clark that he would not necessarily repeal Bill C-51 if elected, but only make amendments to it.  The same stand as Justin’s.

Perhaps the biggest mistake made by the Liberal leader, was showing his hand first, instead of waiting while Mulcair danced around the situation.

After all, Mulcair had the most to lose at the time.  Quebec was still (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: On control freaks

While we’re on the subject of Stephen Harper’s campaign to insult Canada, let’s note the significance of his choice of attacks on Tom Mulcair.

As others have pointed out, the “career politician” complaint makes absolutely no sense as an attempt to contrast Mulcair against Harper – who has been in politics longer, and has far less of an outside resume, than his NDP counterpart.

But it might be explained if the Cons see a need to contrast Mulcair against Justin Trudeau – particularly to revive the latter’s campaign enough to create the vote splits which the Cons need (Read more…)