Categories

A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

Montreal Simon: The New Canada and the Return of the Cool Moose

As I'm sure you know, I'm really enjoying living in Justin Trudeau's Canada, and of course the land of the noble moose. And I'm constantly battling with Cons and other grumpy old Trudeau haters who would try to tear it down, or make it something ugly, or all about pipelines and trade deals.Or poison . . . → Read More: Montreal Simon: The New Canada and the Return of the Cool Moose

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading:- Ross Douthat (!) discusses the distinction between actual cosmopolitanism, and the global elitism that’s instead come to dominate international power relations:Genuine cosmopolitanism is a rare thing. It require… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Carbon49 – Sustainability for Canadian businesses: Why Do Banks Invest in Big Oil?

For profits, obviously. Divesting from fossil fuel would lose business and lower profits, so the thinking goes. But is this true? A study finds ethical banks are just as profitable as major banks. If a mainstream bank adopts sustainable banking principles can they realistically expect to maintain profits? I look into the study’s methodology and see what a major bank can take away from the findings. . . . → Read More: Carbon49 – Sustainability for Canadian businesses: Why Do Banks Invest in Big Oil?

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Luke Savage warns that the Libs’ election win may ring hollow for Canadian progressives: Throughout its democratic history, Canadian politics have basically oscillated between two parties that do not seriously threaten the status quo or the injustices it perpetuates. Occasionally goaded by organized populist movements, they have both . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Alberta Politics: Where are the ‘good Conservatives,’ prepared to speak against their party’s race-baiting tactics?

PHOTOS: Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s tactics have sparked protests, but Conservatives who should know better have been astonishingly quiet. (CommonDreams.org photo.) Below: Former St. Albert MLA Mary O’Neill, Independent MP Brent Rathgeber and Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi. ST. ALBERT, Alberta The single most disheartening thing about this long 2015 federal election campaign has been the . . . → Read More: Alberta Politics: Where are the ‘good Conservatives,’ prepared to speak against their party’s race-baiting tactics?

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Peter Poschen argues that the goals of protecting our climate and ensuring the availability of good jobs isn’t an either-or proposition: (C)limate change and the degradation of natural resources increasingly disrupt economic activity and destroy jobs. The International Labour Organization (ILO) puts the productivity losses generated by climate . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– The Economist argues that lower oil prices offer an ideal opportunity to rethink our energy policy (with a focus on cleaner sources). And Mitchell Anderson offers a eulogy for Alberta’s most recent oil bender: For now the latest Alberta bender is over, and it’s time to take . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Jessica McCormick and Jerry Dias respond to Stephen Poloz’ view that young workers should be happy to work for free, and note that he of all people shouldn’t be pointing the finger at individuals to address problems with systemic unemployment: The most infuriating aspect of Poloz’s statement is . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Following up on yesterday’s column, Michael Harris offers his take on how Stephen Harper refuses to accept anything short of war as an option: Stephen Harper talks as if this is yet another of those good-versus-evil fables he is always passing off to the public as deep analysis . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Robert Reich discusses the rise of the non-working rich as an indicator that extreme wealth has less and less to do with merit – as well as the simple policy steps which can reverse the trend: In reality, most of America’s poor work hard, often in two or . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading.

– Nafeez Ahmed writes about the dangers of combining growing inequality and increased resource extraction: By investigating the human-nature dynamics of these past cases of collapse, the project identifies the most salient interrelated factors which explain civilisational decline, and which may help determine the risk of collapse today: namely, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, featuring my take on the IMF’s recent report (PDF) on the relationship between equality, redistribution and growth.

I’ve already linked to other responses to the report from the Guardian and the Economist. But the column raises a point left largely unaddressed in those pieces – and which seems particularly important given some of the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– The Economist takes a look at the effect of international trade agreements – and confirms the long-held concern that the erosion and non-enforcement of labour standards consistently follows the signing of government suicide pacts: Some results are rather unsurprising. Countries with better civil liberties tend to have . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– The Economist discusses research by Miles Corak and others on intergenerational inequality. And interestingly, other studies seem to suggest Corak has actually underestimated the barriers to social mobility: THE “Great Gatsby curve” is the name Alan Krueger, an economic adviser to Barack Obama, gave to the relationship . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Tim Harper writes that Stephen Harper’s “lone gunman” argument – already implausible in light of the number of Senators and staffers required to cover up the Clusterduff – is falling apart at the seams. But Gloria Galloway notes that the Senators can bail out with their pensions as . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading.

– The Economist takes a look at the effect of a “lean in” philosophy toward work – and finds that we’d get better results encouraging creative development rather than needless busy work: All this “leaning in” is producing an epidemic of overwork, particularly in the United States. Americans now . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Eclectic Lip: The world (of investing) according to Dante

(originally written Oct 21, 2011. Part of Great Upload of 2013.)

It seems like the financial markets will have an “upwards bias” for the next few months, despite the circling-the-drain quality of the macroeconomic picture, which inspired this magazine cover from the Oct 1 issue of The Economist magazine.

If there’s anything I’ve learned . . . → Read More: Eclectic Lip: The world (of investing) according to Dante

Eclectic Lip: Green byelection blues

Alas, the Green Party didn’t pick any seats up in the Nov 26 Canadian federal by-elections. While their strong showings probably count as a real moral victory, I imagine at this stage they’d prefer amoral, real victories. 😉 As it turns out, Parliament’s composition is unchanged, “while my green heart gently weeps”. Despite donating to […] . . . → Read More: Eclectic Lip: Green byelection blues

The Disaffected Lib: The Economist Pleads for "Radical Centrist Politics"

The ordinarily conservative magazine, The Economist, is calling for radical political reform, what it calls “true progressivism.”

 One reason why Wall Street accounts for a disproportionate share of the wealthy is the implicit subsidy given to too-big-to-fail banks. From doctors to lawyers, many high-paying professions are full of unnecessary restrictive practices. And then there . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: The Economist Pleads for "Radical Centrist Politics"

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading.

– The Economist adds a noteworthy voice to the chorus calling for greater tax enforcement to ensure the corporate elite pays its fair share: Characterising this steady financing as short-term lending is “the ultimate example of form over substance” and undermines a fundamental tenet of American tax policy, huffed . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

CANADIAN PROGRESSIVE WORLD: The Economist Insulted Progressive Canadians’ Intelligence

Earlier, I gloated over the influential right-leaning British magazine’s criticism of Harper’s burgeoning elected dictatorship. I’ve a second sober take on the issue. See, I failed to read between the lines: The Economist actually ridiculed progressive Canadians’ collective intelligence.

First, the magazine tells its readers: “Polls show that voters still consider him a more impressive . . . → Read More: CANADIAN PROGRESSIVE WORLD: The Economist Insulted Progressive Canadians’ Intelligence

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to end your week.

– Dan Gardner nicely sums up how any Con cabinet shuffles are utterly irrelevant since Stephen Harper prefers ciphers to functional ministers in any event: In the past, parties in power always had factions, and ministers with their own political clout, and these provided at least a modest check . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

CANADIAN PROGRESSIVE WORLD: Right-leaning British magazine rips Stephen Harper

Since coming to power in 2006, the Canadian prime minister “has acquired a reputation for playing fast and loose with the rules.” Harper plays to his social conservative base. He and his Conservative majority government tolerate neither criticism nor dissent. But these “bullying” ways are set to boost the opposition’s popularity and lead to Harper’s . . . → Read More: CANADIAN PROGRESSIVE WORLD: Right-leaning British magazine rips Stephen Harper