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Accidental Deliberations: On cost comparisons

Following up on yesterday’s column, let’s take a moment to examine just how foolish the Wall government’s insistence on trying to sell off SaskTel is even as a matter of pure dollars and cents.Again, I’ve previously calculated the benefit to Saskatchew… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On cost comparisons

Accidental Deliberations: On cost comparisons

Following up on yesterday’s column, let’s take a moment to examine just how foolish the Wall government’s insistence on trying to sell off SaskTel is even as a matter of pure dollars and cents.Again, I’ve previously calculated the benefit to Saskatchew… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On cost comparisons

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how we shouldn’t believe any of the unenforceable promises Brad Wall and his government will make to try to pitch a SaskTel selloff – and how citizens stand to lose out from a sale.For further reading…- CBC reported on Wall’s going out of hi… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how we shouldn’t believe any of the unenforceable promises Brad Wall and his government will make to try to pitch a SaskTel selloff – and how citizens stand to lose out from a sale.For further reading…- CBC reported on Wall’s going out of hi… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: On risk factors

Yes, “grasping at straws” is the right analysis of the Sask Party’s attempt to make excuses to gift SaskTel to the corporate sector. But it’s also worth noting something those straws have in common.Presumably any risk to SaskTel can be paired with an o… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On risk factors

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Gerald Caplan suggests that Rogers and Bell might be ripe for nationalization – though it’s also worth pointing out that we don’t have to guess what happens when a Crown delivers telecommunications services: The British Labour Party has begun to make the case that market fundamentalism, or neoliberalism, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Reused column day

For those wondering, my Leader-Post column was on hiatus last week, but will return this week.

In the meantime, I’ll point back to this post and column as introductory reading for Janet French’s new report on SaskTel’s disclosure of customers’ personal information to government authorities. (And I’ll add here one comment which didn’t make it . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Reused column day

The Canadian Progressive: Harper’s Online Surveillance Bill C‐13 Reveals “Canada’s Growing Privacy Deficit”

by: Obert Madondo | June 8, 2014

Canada’s privacy experts are gravely concerned about Bill C-13, the Conservatives’ Orwellian cybercrime bill, deceptively named “Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act“.

Last week, over 30 of them expressed their concern in a scathing letter addressed to Prime Minister Stephen Harper. The signatories also told Harper that, Daniel . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: Harper’s Online Surveillance Bill C‐13 Reveals “Canada’s Growing Privacy Deficit”

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Michael Hiltzik points out new research showing that business-focused policies do nothing at all to encourage any positive economic outcomes: in fact, a higher rating from ALEC for low-tax, low-regulation government correlates to less economic growth. But Kevin Drum highlights what the corporate agenda is really intended . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Canada’s telecommunication providers and government agencies are each showing next to no regard for the privacy of consumers – and how the Cons want to make matters worse by allowing for far more sharing within the corporate sector.

For further reading…– Again, reporting on the Privacy Commissioner of Canada’s investigation can be . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Andrew Jackson reviews Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century, while Paul Mason offers a useful summary. And David Atkins applies its most important lesson in response to some typical right-wing spin prioritizing assets over incomes: (I)nstead of doing something about radical inequality, the new neoliberal answer is . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, looking at a $396 million annual benefit in the form of lower wireless rates for Saskatchewan residents serves as a prime example of the value of public enterprise – and pointing out a few other public options which could help ensure that the interests of citizens are better reflected in the marketplace.

For further . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Andrew Jackson writes that increases in Canadian inequality have been the result of deliberate policy choices: In an important recent book, Inequality and the Fading of Redistributive Politics, Keith Banting and John Myles argue that, while rooted in the market, politics has also been a major force . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

The Progressive Economics Forum: The rise and fall (and rise?) of Blackberry – the story that just won’t quit

This is an experiment. I’m writing an essay based on my latest Metro Morning column. Each of these columns take hours of prep, so I thought I’d convert it into prose to see if it’s worth it. Would love your feedback.

The rise and fall (and rise?) of Blackberry is a story that has . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: The rise and fall (and rise?) of Blackberry – the story that just won’t quit

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Annie Lowrey reports on the still-spreading blight of income inequality in the U.S.: An updated study by the prominent economists Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Piketty shows that the top 1 percent of earners took more than one-fifth of the country’s total income in 2012, one of the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how “we must increase stock prices!” – or worse yet, “we must increase company X’s stock prices!” – makes for a thoroughly regressive public policy goal.

For further reading…– The examples referenced in the column include Carol Goar’s column threatening a revolt over telecom share prices, and Andrew Leach’s piece about oil sands . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

The Canadian Progressive: Reject Verizon, Establish Telecommunications Crown Corporation: Union

The Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada urges the Harper government to reject Verizon’s bid to become Canada’s fourth largest telecoms carrier and, instead, establish a telecommunications Crown Corporation.

The post Reject Verizon, Establish Telecommunications Crown Corporation: Union appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Union concerned about Verizon spying on Canadians

If New York-based Verizon Communications takes over Canada’s telecommunications, it will pass Canadians’ personal data to US intelligence agencies, says Canadian union.

The post Union concerned about Verizon spying on Canadians appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Harper government should stop wooing Verizon Communications: Union

The Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada opposes the Harper government efforts to woo US telecom giant Verizon Communications “to take over Canada’s telecommunications.”

The post Harper government should stop wooing Verizon Communications: Union appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Disaffected Lib: Oh Yes We Do

Leave it to the head of Canada’s most disliked cellular provider, Rogers CEO Nadir Mohamed, to whine that Canada doesn’t need a fourth major cellphone company.

Okay, Nadir, how bout we put that to the test.   Let’s put it to every Rogers customer and former customer from the past three years and see what they . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Oh Yes We Do

LeDaro: Has Harper Government sold out to China?

The Harper government has agreed to an establishment of a Telecommunications Company, Huawei, in Canada. Security experts in both Canada and the US are very concerned as China is known to spy through telecommunications.

Both the US and Australia had refused to China to make such an arrangement because of security concerns. However it looks . . . → Read More: LeDaro: Has Harper Government sold out to China?