Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – David Giles reports on the increasing cost of living in Saskatchewan. And Barbara Ehrenreich writes about the future of the U.S.’ working class – including the reality that its major recent success has involved improving minimum wage levels: Now when politicians invoke “the working class,” they are likely ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Martin Kenney comments on Canada’s continuing role in “snow washing” offshore tax evasion. The Conference Board of Canada examines the massive gap between what Canada should receive in public revenues, and what’s actually taken in to keep our society functioning. And Kamal Ahmed highlights how employers are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Bruce Campbell points out how Donald Trump’s blind hatred toward any type of regulation can impose costs in Canada and elsewhere to the extent we’re bound by trade deals which make “harmonization” an expected standard. And Pia Eberhardt recognizes that there’s no point in locking ourselves into the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Kevin Young, Tarun Banerjee and Michael Schwartz discuss how capital uses the exact tools it’s working to take away from labour – including the threat of strikes – to impose an anti-social agenda on the public: Capitalists routinely exert leverage over governments by withholding the resources — ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – The Canadian Labour Congress offers its suggestions as to how international trade agreements can be reworked to ensure a more fair global economy. But Bill Curry reports that we’re first more likely to see public interest regulation undermined from within Canada as the provinces sign away their authority ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the hope that this past weekend’s protests will be just the start of an activist response to Donald Trump and his corporatist and authoritarian allies. For further reading…– Robert Booth and Alexandra Topping reported on last weekend’s rallies from a global perspective. Tanara Yelland discussed the march on the ground in Washington, while ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Scott Sinclair offers his take on what we can expect Donald Trump to pursue in renegotiating NAFTA, and points out that while there are some options which might boost Canadian manufacturing and other sectors, it’s also possible that matters could get far worse for the citizens of all ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Owen Jones writes that we should give credit for the failure of the Trans-Pacific Partnership to the popular opposition which will be need to push back against Donald Trump, rather than pretending it represents a win for Trump himself: That Trump has any ownership over TPP is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Liam Byrne argues that it’s long past time to reevaluate an economic framework which has produced only highly concentrated wealth for a lucky few at everybody else’s expense. And Graeme Wearden reports on Oxfam’s call to rein in both firm-level tax avoidance, and government policy oriented toward eliminating ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Star argues that a crackdown on tax evasion and avoidance is a crucial first step in reining in inequality. Susan Delacourt wonders when, if ever, Chrystia Freeland’s apparent interest in inequality will show up in her role in government. And Vanmala Subramaniam reminds us why the cause ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Thomas Frank writes that a progressive party can only expect to succeed if it places principles of equality and workers’ interests at the core of everything it does – rather than serving mostly as the voice of a wealthy professional class: Somewhere in a sunny corner of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Peter Fleming writes that the promise of entrepreneurial self-employment has given way to the nightmare of systematic precarious work: (T)he move to reclassify people as self-employed follows a very simple formula: it helps reduce labour costs and maximise profits for businesses that would rather use contractors than a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – In The Public Interest studies how the privatization of services leads to increased inequality: In the Public Interest’s analysis of recent government contracting identifies five ways in which government privatization disproportionately hurts poor individuals and families… Creation of new user fees: The creation of new user fees to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Lawrence Summers discusses the economic damage being done by a top-heavy income spectrum – as the effect of major stimulus programs may have been wholly outweighed by the decline in middle-class incomes. – Meanwhile, Canadians for Tax Fairness points out the impending tax court case which will bring ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Branko Milanovic examines whether the U.S.’ tax system is actually progressive all the way to the top of the income spectrum – and finds that there’s not enough data about the treatment of the extremely wealthy to be sure. And Robert Cribb and Marco Chown Oved discuss ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Paul Wells argues that climate change and First Nations reconciliation – two of the issues which the Libs have tried to turn into signature priorities – look set to turn into areas of weakness as Justin Trudeau continues his party’s tradition of dithering. And Martin Lukacs writes that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Henning Meyer interviews Tony Atkinson about the readily-available options to combat inequality – with the first step being to make sure people actually have a voice in the decisions which define how wealth and power are allocated: So, if you dive into the potential solutions you seem to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Graham Lowe and Frank Graves examine the state of Canada’s labour market, and find a strong desire among workers for an activist government to ensure improved pay equality and social supports. Oxfam reaches similar conclusions in studying workers and employers in Scotland. And Emma Teitel reports on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Bill Moyers writes about the conflict between the wealthy few seeking to preserve their privilege, and the balance of society seeking fairness for everybody: I keep in my files a warning published in [The Economist] a dozen years ago, on the eve of George W. Bush’s second ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Don Pittis writes that it will take far more than words and sentiments to reverse the trend of growing income inequality. Elaine Power points out that Ontario’s social assistance programs – like those elsewhere – far fall short of meeting basic human needs. And Christopher Mackie reminds us ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations: The EC is also investigating state support received by Amazon and McDonalds in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations: The EC is also investigating state support received by Amazon and McDonalds in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Dennis Howlett discusses the public costs of allowing tax avoidance – as Canada could afford a national pharmacare program (and much more) merely by ensuring that the rich pay what they owe: Eliminating tax haven use could save Canada almost $8 billion a year. That’s enough to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Dennis Howlett discusses the public costs of allowing tax avoidance – as Canada could afford a national pharmacare program (and much more) merely by ensuring that the rich pay what they owe: Eliminating tax haven use could save Canada almost $8 billion a year. That’s enough to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jim Hightower argues that there’s no reason the U.S. can’t develop an economic model which leads to shared prosperity – and the ideas are no less relevant in Canada: Take On Wall Street is both the name and the feisty attitude of a nationwide campaign that a coalition ...