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The Canadian Progressive: Energy East pipeline: Maude Barlow raises alarm in Saskatchewan and Manitoba

Beginning April 11, communities along TransCanada’s proposed Energy East route in Manitoba and Saskatchewan will hear why the pipeline is all risk and little reward for them.

The post Energy East pipeline: Maude Barlow raises alarm in Saskatchewan and Manitoba appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Harper government’s anti-terror laws target anti-pipeline foes

The Harper government Bill C-51 and other recently-passed anti-terror laws are designed to target and silence anti-pipeline foes, protect Big Oil interests.

The post Harper government’s anti-terror laws target anti-pipeline foes appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Disaffected Lib: A Closer Look at Oil and Climate Change.

Stephen Harper will not be pleased.  The Carnegie Endowment is fingering his cherished Tar Sands.

Not all oil is created equal.  Sweet crude, of the Saudi sort, comes out of the ground almost ready to use.  It’s pumped out of the ground easily, free of most contaminants (sulphur, water, sand, natural gas).  The amount of energy required to extract and refine a barrel of oil is modest.  That, then, provides the benchmarks by which other oils from other places can be judged.

A new report from the Carnegie Endowment, “Know Your Oil: Creating a Global Oil-Climate Index,” (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: It’s taboo to talk climate change at NEB’s Energy East hearings

By excluding climate change from the forthcoming review of the proposed Energy East project, the NEB is prioritizing Big oil’s anti-environment interests.

The post It’s taboo to talk climate change at NEB’s Energy East hearings appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Fight Over Keystone XL Tar Sands Pipeline Isn’t Over

U.S. President Obama vetoed the Republican bill approving Keystone XL, but the fight over TransCanada’s climate-threatening tar sands pipeline isn’t over.

The post Fight Over Keystone XL Tar Sands Pipeline Isn’t Over appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Carol Graham discusses the high financial and personal costs of poverty: Reported stress levels are higher on average in the U.S. than in Latin America. Importantly, the gap between the levels of the rich and poor is also much greater, with the U.S. poor reporting the highest levels of stress of all cohorts. Of course ‘stress’ is a complex phenomenon, however: “Good” stress is associated with the pursuit of goals, while “bad” stress is associated with struggling to cope. Bad stress, which is associated with an inability to plan ahead, (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Group Letter Urged Obama To Veto Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

Hundreds of First Nation leaders, environmentalists, land owners, musicians, authors, actors and artists signed letter urging Obama to veto Keystone XL pipeline.

The post Group Letter Urged Obama To Veto Keystone XL Pipeline Bill appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Canadian Climate Activists Storm Toronto Stock Exchange, Demand Fossil Fuel Divestment

#GlobalDivestmentDay: Canadian climate justice activists disrupted the opening of the Toronto Stock Exchange, demanded immediate divestment from fossil fuels.

The post Canadian Climate Activists Storm Toronto Stock Exchange, Demand Fossil Fuel Divestment appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Disaffected Lib: The Clean Energy Light at the End of the Tunnel

High carbon energy’s days are numbered.  A report from IRENA, the International Renewable Energy Agency, predicts a 40% drop in the cost of renewable energy over the next few years.  That should more than offset the recent drop in oil prices and consign the highest cost/highest carbon fossil fuels to the dustbin of history.

IRENA’s report, “Renewable Power Generation Costs in 2014, states that biomass, hydropower, geothermal and onshore wind are all competitive with or cheaper than coal, oil and gas-fired power stations, even without financial support and despite falling oil prices. The report was released at IRENA’s annual conference (Read more…)

The Disaffected Lib: Harper’s Bitumen Policy – Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell

The Harper government has gone to extraordinary lengths to avoid the public learning just what’s in bitumen and the risk that stuff poses to our rivers, our lakes, our groundwater supply and our oceans.  Mum’s the word.

Two things we’ve learned about Harper by now.  He’s secretive and pathologically dishonest.  The man is a born liar.

One of those subjects Harper wants to keep out of the public eye is bitumen, his Athabasca Tar Sands bounty.  His government commissioned a study in 2003 and promptly buried it.  It has now surfaced but it raises a massive number of questions and (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- The Economist argues that lower oil prices offer an ideal opportunity to rethink our energy policy (with a focus on cleaner sources). And Mitchell Anderson offers a eulogy for Alberta’s most recent oil bender: For now the latest Alberta bender is over, and it’s time to take stock of certain destructive lifestyle choices. The budgetary cupboards are bare, yet Canada’s allegedly “richest” province has an unfunded municipal infrastructure deficit of up to $24 billion. A badly needed new cancer treatment facility has just been delayed past 2020. The long-overdue plan to build (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Canadian Environmental Group Uses Satire To Highlight Energy East Pipeline Risks

Environmental Defence’s “Great Canadian Migrations” satirical video says grave risks posed by TransCanada’s proposed Energy East tar sands pipeline include climate change and oil spills

The post Canadian Environmental Group Uses Satire To Highlight Energy East Pipeline Risks appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Common Sense Canadian: Harper govt tries to block NAFTA from investigating leaking tailing ponds

Syncrude tailings pond (David Dodge, Pembina Institute)

Read this Jan. 12 story from CBC.ca on the Harper government’s efforts to block an investigation by NAFTA’s environmental watchdog of oil sands tailing ponds leaking into the Athabasca River.

Canada is trying to stop NAFTA’s environmental watchdog from taking a closer look at the environmental effects of the huge tailings ponds produced by Alberta’s oilsands, and it appears Mexico and the U.S. will go along with efforts to stop a formal investigation.

If that happens, it would be the third time in a year Canada has stopped North American Free Trade (Read more…)

The Progressive Economics Forum: Louis-Philippe Rochon’s Top 10 Economic Predictions for 2015

Louis-Philippe Rochon has written a provocative blog post for the CBC titled “Top 10 Economic Predictions for 2015.”

The post is available here.

The Canadian Progressive: To limit global warming, 85% of Canada’s tar sands must stay in the ground: Study

A new study published in the scientific journal Nature says 85% of Canada’s dirty tar sands must “remain in the ground” to limit global warming.

The post To limit global warming, 85% of Canada’s tar sands must stay in the ground: Study appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: President Obama Threatens To Veto Congress’ Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

U.S. President Barack Obama has threatened to veto a Congressional bill that would force the approval of TransCanada’s Keystone XL tar sands pipeline.

The post President Obama Threatens To Veto Congress’ Keystone XL Pipeline Bill appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Disaffected Lib: What’s a Single Issue Prime Minister to Do?

These are not good times for Canada’s petro-prime minister.  Harper’s Holy Grail, Canadian energy superpowerdom, has sprung a leak.  Even The Globe & Mail, says bitumen no longer makes any economic sense.

If $40 a barrel still seems a ways off, consider that the benchmark price for oil sands crude is already trading in that price range. What’s more, if production from high-cost sources isn’t withdrawn from an oversupplied market, oil prices may soon be trading even lower. The first thing Canadians should recognize about the new world order for oil prices is that – contrary to what we’re (Read more…)

Alberta Diary: Never mind the Mudville Nine: Nothing has changed, nothing ever will, that is all!

“Your health. Our promise.” It’s March 1, 2013, and then-premier Alison Redford announces plans to build a new cancer treatment facility in Calgary to replace the grubby and overcrowded Tom Baker Cancer Centre. (Photo grabbed from Metro Newspapers.) But that was then. This is now. Below: Alberta Health Minister Stephen Mandel; the Tom Baker facility in northwest Calgary.

As Danielle Smith might have said, were she still the leader of the Opposition, “nothing has changed!”

On Friday, mass media were uncritically reporting the “reasons” the new cancer hospital promised to Calgary on which construction was supposed (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Oilmart: Low, low prices!

By Lorne Craig

Cartoonist Lorne Craig’s take on plunging oil prices and what they mean for Canada’s one-track economy.

The post Oilmart: Low, low prices! appeared first on The Common Sense Canadian.

The Canadian Progressive: Leehi Yona: Canadians’ best interests “certainly not represented” at COP20

Canada’s best interests weren’t represented at the recent COP20 climate conference in Peru, argues Leehi Yona, a Canadian youth delegate recently named one of Canada’s top environmentalist under 25.

The post Leehi Yona: Canadians’ best interests “certainly not represented” at COP20 appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Carter Price offers another look at how inequality damages economic development. And the Broadbent Institute examines the wealth gap in Canada – which is already recognized as a serious problem, but also far larger than most people realize:

- Paul Buchheit discusses how the U.S. is turning poor people into commodities or criminals. Chuk Plante reviews some facts about child poverty in Saskatchewan – with a particular focus on the need to measure and reduce the alarmingly high rates of child poverty among First Nations children. Suzanne Moore points out how (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: On unjust cause

Shorter Peter Kent, Stephen Harper Talking Point Dispenser Level Infinity: The Dear Leader fired me for making some effort to do a job with the work “environment” in the title, rather than merely going through the motions. And through much re-education, I’ve come to see that he was right to do it.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- George Monbiot opines that curbing corporate power is the most fundamental political issue we need to address in order to make progress possible on any other front: Does this sometimes feel like a country under enemy occupation? Do you wonder why the demands of so much of the electorate seldom translate into policy? Why parties of the left seem incapable of offering effective opposition to market fundamentalism, let alone proposing coherent alternatives? Do you wonder why those who want a kind and decent and just world, in which both human beings and other (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Aditya Chakrabortty contrasts the myth of the free market against the reality that massive amounts of public money and other privileges are shoveled toward the corporate sector: Few conceits are more cherished by our political classes than the notion that this is a free-market economy. To the right it is what makes Britain great. For the left it is what they are up against. And for the rich it is what justifies their huge pay packets: after all, they have earned it.

When asked for his view of western civilisation, Gandhi said he (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Harper Breaks Promise To Regulate Oil And Gas Emissions

In Parliament today, PM Stephen Harper said “it would be crazy economic policy” to regulate the Canadian oil and gas industry’s greenhouse gas emissions.

The post Harper Breaks Promise To Regulate Oil And Gas Emissions appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.