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The Canadian Progressive: Energy East: “Treaty and Aboriginal rights must be respected”

Energy East must respect treaty and Aboriginal rights, says the Ontario Energy Board in its just-released review of TransCanada’s proposed pipeline.

The post Energy East: “Treaty and Aboriginal rights must be respected” appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Andrew Jackson discusses how increased development of the oil sands fits into Canada’s economic future – and how it’s foolhardy to assume that one necessarily equates to the other: A new and effective global climate agreement to avoid hitting the 2 degree increase would mandate a large, phased in shift away from carbon fuels through greater energy efficiency, and a major transition to renewable sources of energy. But there would still be a role for carbon fuels in the transition.

Here in Canada, a 2009 study (funded by the TD bank) by Mark Jaccard (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Energy East pipeline carries more risks than rewards for Ontario, says report

TransCanada’s proposed Energy East pipeline carries more risks, such as oil spills, than rewards, for Ontario and First Nations, says the Ontario Energy Board in a new report.

The post Energy East pipeline carries more risks than rewards for Ontario, says report appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Energy East pipeline carries more risks than rewards for Ontario: report

TransCanada’s proposed Energy East pipeline carries more risks, such as oil spills, than rewards, for Ontario and First Nations, says the Ontario Energy Board in a new report.

The post Energy East pipeline carries more risks than rewards for Ontario: report appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: On campaign divisions

If it wasn’t obvious already, the last decade of resource politics in Canada should offer us a reminder that the immediate development of resources without meaningful consideration of externalities and risks is all too often a default position.

But if there’s anything that can shatter the consensus of developing resources based on the bare hope that people will benefit as a result, it’s a sufficiently laughable attempt to push it past what people can reasonably accept – particularly by explicitly prioritizing the resources themselves over the people who are supposed to support their development.

Which is to say: thank you, (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, expanding on this post as to how we should be criticizing the politicians who are wilfully misleading the public about the future of Canada’s oil industry – and not the ones who are willing to keep living in reality once a campaign is on.

And if Stephen Harper comes out of hiding today, it might offer a particularly opportune time to explain why he’s in agreement with the “decarbonisation of the global economy”, along with what his government plans to do to achieve that goal. 

For further reading…- Again, Justin Trudeau’s comment on the need to (Read more…)

Michal Rozworski: Linda McQuaig is right, but there’s more to it

Since her common-sense quip that most of Canada’s tar sands reserves will have to stay in the ground, Linda McQuaig has been vilified by much of the political establishment and (rightfully) defended by a minority of voices in the media. That the facts of climate science vindicate her has made little difference to the debate. Is this because McQuaig’s comments have inadvertently scratched at a nerve that goes far deeper?

In what would be a world very different from our own, we can imagine a fairly straight line going something like this

Climate science → Climate regulations → Fiscal policy → Just transition

(Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Harper and Trudeau attack NDP candidate McQuaig for stating a scientific fact

Stephen Harper and Justin Trudeau attacked NDP candidate Linda McQuaig for repeating the wildly-published scientific fact that some of Alberta’s tar sands must “remain in the ground” to limit global warming.

The post Harper and Trudeau attack NDP candidate McQuaig for stating a scientific fact appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Excited Delirium: The Leading NDP Need to Show Leadership

Being in the lead mean you have to take the lead on challenging issues. It’s time for the NDP to truly prove to Canadians that they are worth voting for.

Excited Delirium: Reaction to McQuaig Fuel Awareness of Harper’s Lack of Plan

Why the hyper-reaction to Linda McQuaig’s comments about keeping the Tar Sands in the ground? Because it exposes Stephen Harper’s lies and lack of plan.

Bill Longstaff: Linda McCuaig does us all a big favour

Last week the NDP candidate for Toronto Centre, Linda McQuaig, stirred the tar sands pot, telling a CBC panel discussion that for Canada to meet its climate change targets, “a lot of the oil sands oil may have to stay in the ground.” As an Albertan, I suppose I am supposed to be offended at this slighting of our precious sands. Or perhaps as a Dipper I should be concerned that she has undermined

Accidental Deliberations: Juxtaposition

ZOMG A CANDIDATE SAID UNFETTERED TARSANDS EXTRACTION WON’T GO ON FOREVER!!!! HERESY AGAINST OUR PETROLEUM OVERLORDS!!! THAT PARTY IS DOOMED!!! DOOMED I SEZ!!!

Also, pay no attention to this guy: Justin Trudeau:  The reason environmental groups in Canada and across the United States are so concerned about Canadian oil is because Mr. Harper has turned the oil sands into the scapegoat around the world for climate change. He is – has put a big target on our oil sands, which are going to be an important part of our economy for a number of years to come, although (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Matthew Brown and Matt Volz report on the latest oil train derailment in North Dakota. Justin Giovannetti discusses how fracking is leading to regular earthquakes in previously-stable parts of Alberta – which looks doubly dangerous given the presence of pipelines in the affected area. Garret Ellison examines Enbridge’s blithe disregard for the safety of 60-year-old pipelines which it wants to keep operating indefinitely. And Chris Mooney comments on the link between climate change and wildfires.

- All of which leads nicely to Tzeporah Berman’s point that we need to start a real (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Before the fall

Shorter Brad Wall: The whole concept of “From many peoples, strength” doesn’t do much for me. But “From many dinosaur remains, climate devastation”, now that gets me – and any right-thinking Westerner – all tingly with pride.

Bill Longstaff: I know you have to say that stuff, Rachel, but still ….

At a recent speech to international investors in Calgary, Alberta Premier Rachel Notley described the tar sands as “a tremendous asset” and an “international showpiece.” Hearing my premier and the leader of my party describe the tar sands as a tremendous asset makes me cringe. They are indeed an international showpiece, but not the kind we should be bragging about.

Ms. Notley is a very bright

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Thomas Lemieux and W. Craig Riddell examine Canada’s income distribution and find that one’s place in the 1% is based primarily on rent-seeking rather than merit: (I)n Canada, as in the United States, executives and others working in the financial and business services sectors have been driving the growth in top incomes. Unlike in the United States, however, the oil and gas sector has also played an important role in income growth at the top, especially in more recent years, and holders of medical degrees have lost ground. Their results for engineers (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: To the Ends of the Earth: Filmmaker One-on-One

David Lavallee talks with fellow filmmaker and Common Sense Canadian publisher Damien Gillis about the former’s project, “To the Ends of the Earth”, which connects the dots between society’s hunger for energy and the new wave of extreme fossil fuel projects wreaking havoc around the world. The two discuss the challenges of making a film in remote locations and running a crowdfunder, which Lavallee is currently in the midst of doing to help him finish his film.

From battling the elements to being confronted by CSIS after filming with a drone at Kinder Morgan’s North Burnaby terminal, Lavallee – director of (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: For Canada, a commitment to the environment and jobs is possible

Naomi Klein and environmental activists will call for a “long term sustainable strategy that leads to renewable energy” during the March for Jobs, Justice and the Climate in Toronto on July 5.

The post For Canada, a commitment to the environment and jobs is possible appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Daniel Marans reports on Bernie Sanders’ push for international action against austerity in Greece and elsewhere. And Binoy Kampmark documents the anti-democratic and antisocial ideology on the other side of the austerity debate.

- Noah Smith writes that while there’s no discernible connection between massive pay for CEOs and actual corporate performance, there’s a strong link between who an executive knows and how much the executive can extract.

- The CP reports on UNESCO’s push to study the impact of the tar sands on Wood Buffalo National Park. And Tavia Grant breaks (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Tar Sands Documentary: To the Ends of the Earth

A documentary warning of the consequences of the unbridled expansion of Canada’s destructive tar sands, and the rise of extreme energy, is in the works.

The post Tar Sands Documentary: To the Ends of the Earth appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: On end dates

There’s no doubt that Stephen Harper characteristically did everything in his power to put off any meaningful international action on climate change. But it’s worth noting that his procrastination only resulted in a more definitive statement from the G7 as to where the global economy is ultimately headed: Mindful of this goal and considering the latest IPCC results, we emphasize that deep cuts in global greenhouse gas emissions are required with a decarbonisation of the global economy over the course of this century.

Of course, that common destination might be reached in one of two ways. On that front, we (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: NEB’s Energy East pipeline review must be suspended: Groups

Over 60 groups from across Canada recently asked the National Energy Board to suspend its biased review of TransCanada’s Energy East tar sands pipeline.

The post NEB’s Energy East pipeline review must be suspended: Groups appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

A Different Point of View....: We must start ‘shaming’ thosewho lie to us, destroy our climate

During a flight from Montreal to Halifax I missed a chance to carry out an act of defiance – “shaming” – against a person who has greatly abused his position of authority in Canada.

Given how powerless ordinary folk and public interest groups have become, I would like to see people embarrass the hell out of those who take advantage of the public by lying to us, cheating us, or destroying our priceless environment.

As I made my way down the aisle, I spotted the square jaw, the glasses and the prematurely-balding head. I was going to get my chance (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Time for some adult supervision

The latest Con dodge on greenhouse gas emission regulations for the oil and gas industry is to say that they’ll promise to deal with a few collateral activities, just as long as actual production continues to receive a free pass: Aglukkaq also announced new rules to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector, such as industrial leaks and gas flares, which makes up a significant portion of the industry’s total emissions.

Notably omitted, of course, is the rest of the industry’s total emissions.

So how does that painful level of parsing to avoid what has to be done (Read more…)

Political Eh-conomy: Calling capital’s bluff in Alberta

The votes had barely been counted in Alberta when stories purporting to herald capital flight, particularly from the oil sands, were already appearing in venues like the Financial Post. As if on cue, the TSX fell 2%,the day after the Alberta election. What are we to make of this? Is Notley’s Alberta in the position of Rae’s Ontario 25 years ago, already being undermined?

An assessment of the NDP’s victory in Alberta grounded in reality has to account for the fact that the place of the oil industry in the province is, for the moment, being left largely (Read more…)