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The Canadian Progressive: Margaret Atwood leads artists’ rebellion against Harper’s Bill C-51

Celebrated author Margaret Atwood is leading a group of 200 notable Canadian writers and artists demanding an immediate repeal of Bill C-51, Stephen Harper’s “secret police” legislation. C­51, the artists argue, “directly attacks the creative arts and free expression in this country.”

The post Margaret Atwood leads artists’ rebellion against Harper’s Bill C-51 appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: Why Internet Privacy Should be a Key Election Issue

Internet law expert and University of Ottawa prof, Michael Geist, argues that Internet privacy and Harper’s draconian anti-terror Bill C-51 should be key 2015 federal election issues.

The post Michael Geist: Why Internet Privacy Should be a Key Election Issue appeared first on The Canadian Progressive. Kent Roach & Craig Forcese: Press the reset button on security

The ongoing work of Professors Kent Roach and Craig Forcese on C-51 provides the most exhaustive analysis of the bill and is a must-read for anyone concerned with the issue.

Article by Kent Roach and Craig Forcese for the National Post

Security issues are a campaign issue — at least we think they are. To date, little has actually been said on the topic, and what has been said amounts to the parties doubling down on entrenched and vague (even symbolic) positions.

read more CBC: Tories yank ’24 hour surveillance’ stickers on signs in Harper’s Calgary riding

File this under “So amazing it’s actually true.”

Stephen Harper’s constituency team have been busying themselves by adding “24 hour surveillance” stickers to their own election signs. And then removing them when CBC noticed.

Article by Haydn Watters for CBC

read more Common Sense Canadian: Why privacy matters in this Canadian election

Most Canadians do not want to give up their privacy rights. This election, will you vote for online privacy? Pledge your vote at

Article by Kevin Grandia for Common Sense Canadian 

While you are out this weekend enjoying the last days of summer on the beach and the RCMP come by to check whether your cooler is full of (gasp) beer or wine, you have every right to tell them (I would suggest politely) that no, they cannot look in your cooler.

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Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Howard Elliott writes about the need for senior levels of government to help address the housing needs facing Canadian communities. And the report from Saskatchewan’s advisory group on poverty reduction includes housing among its key priorities as well (while also favouring work on a basic income).

- Meanwhile, Armine Yalnizyan reminds us that the Cons’ destruction of the census is making it far more difficult to identify and address social problems.

- Justin Ling documents the latest example of Stephen Harper’s utter contempt for the concept of accountability, as national media outlets (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

- Martha Friendly examines what a “national child care program” actually means. And Jim Stanford makes a compelling economic case as to why Canada needs one: In the case of early childhood education, however, this standard claim of government “poverty” is exactly backwards.  Because there is overwhelming and credible economic evidence that investing in universal ECE programs is actually a money-maker for governments.  In this case, the argument is truly not whether government can afford to provide universal quality care.  In reality, especially at a moment in history when economists worry (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Christos Tsiolkas talks to Yanis Varoufakis about the Troika’s appalling contempt for Greek democracy. And Barbara Ehrenreich laments the fact that only well-off people are given any meaningful opportunity to speak about poverty and deprivation – though that should highlight the need for workers to organize to ensure their voices are heard: There are many thousands of people like these – gifted journalists who want to address serious social issues but cannot afford to do so in a media environment that thrives by refusing to pay, or anywhere near adequately pay, its “content (Read more…) CTV: File breach at electronic spy agency prompts mandatory privacy training

This is the agency our government is telling us to “just trust” with our secrets?

Article by Jim Bronskill for CTV News

OTTAWA – Canada’s electronic spy agency introduced mandatory privacy awareness training for all employees in March following an internal breach involving personal information.

read more Toronto Star: RCMP tracked Toronto activists with fake Facebook profile

Would liking a page or an article about blacklivesmatter on your social profile get you tracked by the RCMP, looking for other “subversive” materials? Does sharing content about social equality make you an activist? Subversive? A target of the RCMP?

And what’s next, under C-51… ?

Article by Laurent Bastien Corbeil for the Toronto Star

Has a waddle of penguins ever “liked” your Facebook page? If so, your account may have been monitored by the RCMP.

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Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Paul de Grauwe points out that the European push to force Greece into continued austerity is the most important factor holding back a recovery, as the country would be fully solvent if it were being allowed to borrow money on anything but the most draconian of terms. And Paul Mason criticizes the war that’s been declared against the Greek public for trying to pursue democratic governance – while noting that the public’s justified dissatisfaction isn’t going away regardless of the result of the impending referendum.

- Sherif Alsayed-Ali responds to the news that (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Trudeau’s defence of the Liberals’ support for Bill C-51 Falls flat, Michael Geist says

U of Ottawa professor and Internet law expert, Michael Geist, explains why the Justin Trudeau Liberals “made the wrong choice” by supporting Bill C-51

The post Trudeau’s defence of the Liberals’ support for Bill C-51 Falls flat, Michael Geist says appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: On failures of strategy, calculation, politics, principle and general humanity

Shorter Justin Trudeau: Nobody could have foreseen that Canadian voters would judge me based on my actions rather than my self-proclaimed brand.

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the Senate’s failure to provide any second thought on C-51 may serve as the ultimate signal that it has nothing useful to offer Canadians.

For further reading…- PressProgress’ look at the Senate’s sad history is well worth a read. The CBC reports on the Auditor General’s findings about the widespread abuse of public money. And Ian Austen offers a U.S. perspective on what comes next for the Senate.- Meanwhile, Karl Nerenberg explains why abolition is well within reach if anybody is willing to take a leadership role in pursuing it without reopening other (Read more…) Kill Bill C-51

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Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Daria Ukhova summarizes the OECD’s findings on the links between inequality, poverty and the economy: Inequality, economic growth, and poverty. In the new report, the OECD has tried to establish the links between these three phenomena, which so far have been mostly explored in pairs, as the relationship between inequality and growth and the relationship between inequality and poverty. While confirming previous arguments about the negative impact of inequality on growth and on poverty, the OECD has gone a step further, arguing that the mechanism through which inequality actually undermines growth is (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: “Kill Bill C-51″: Conservative Supporters Tell Stephen Harper

Game-changing supporters of the Conservative Party of Canada are warning Stephen Harper Bill C-51 could result in “a Liberal or NDP government”.

The post “Kill Bill C-51″: Conservative Supporters Tell Stephen Harper appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Andrew Jackson weighs in on the need for our public policy to ensure a fair initial distribution of income and power in order to ensure that further redistribution is sustainable: The issue of how to deal with rising inequality and the squeezed middle-class has recently moved to the centre of political debate, with the various parties proposing significant policy changes. International experience suggests that a more equal Canada will require major changes to a wide range of policy levers and not just to the tax and transfer system.

Work by the OECD and (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: #StopC51: Ottawa to host massive protest against Harper’s Bill C-51

On Saturday, May 30, Ottawa will host what’s likely to be a game-changing protest against Bill C-51, PM Stephen Harper’s “secret police” legislation.

The post #StopC51: Ottawa to host massive protest against Harper’s Bill C-51 appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Michael Schwartz and Kevin Young make the case for a greater focus on influencing corporations and other institutions first and foremost – with the expectation that more fair public policy will be possible if a dominant business sector doesn’t stand in the way. David Wessel points out that many states’ tax systems are set up to exacerbate inequality. And Matthew Yglesias notes that a typical set of slap-on-the-wrist fines against banks for massive market manipulations call into question whether the U.S.’ current regulatory structure is anywhere close to sufficient to protect (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Matthew Yglesias points out that a particular income level may have radically different implications depending on an individual’s place in life, and that we can only address inequality by formulating policy accordingly: The median household income in the United States is about $52,000. So go ahead and picture a median-income household. What did you picture?

Did you picture a 25-year-old with a decent job who’s maybe worried about student loans but is basically doing okay? Or did you picture a married pair of 45-year-olds who are both full-time workers stuck in kinda crappy (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Andrew Nikiforuk offers his suggestions as to how Rachel Notley can improve Alberta’s economy and political scene in her first term in office. And thwap comments on the right’s more hysterical responses to Notley’s victory.

- Meanwhile, Duncan Cameron writes that Albertans have joined the rest of Canada in rejecting a regressive tax system. And Louis-Philippe Rochon reminds us that there’s still plenty more which needs to be done on that front at the federal level.

- Justin Ling discusses how C-51 fits into a wider pattern of intrusive surveillance plans – even (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- PressProgress weighs in on corporate Canada’s twelve-figure tax avoidance, while noting that the Cons’ decision to slash enforcement against tax cheats (while attacking charities instead) goes a long way toward explaining the amount of money flowing offshore. And Oxfam is working on its own Canadian fair tax campaign.

- Robert Frank highlights the complete disconnect from reality which results in most American millionaires claiming that they’re in the middle class, rather than representing a privileged few. And Stephen Gordon writes that there’s a similar sleight of hand at work in the Libs’ “middle (Read more…) Conservative MP Laurie Hawn attacks Canadian Businesses that raised concerns about Bill C-51

Wow — this is how Conservative MP Laurie Hawn responded to the now 140+ businesses who have raised concerns in a letter published by the National Post about reckless spying Bill C-51:”[They] should seriously reconsider their business model and their lack of commitment to the values that bind us as Canadians”.

Keep in mind that the list of signatories includes the founder of the largest software company in Canada.

In fact the list of signatories runs the gamut from local bakeries, to property developers, to venture capitalists.  It’s amazingly unbecoming of a public office holder like Laurie Hawn to question (Read more…) LAST CHANCE: Just 24 hours to tell your MP to #RejectFear and #StopC51

This is it folks – there are now just 24 hours before tomorrow’s FINAL House of Commons vote on Bill C-51.

That’s right – there are just hours left to tell your MP to vote against this reckless Bill that will endanger our rights, turn CSIS into a secret police force, and make us all less safe.

As the clock ticks down, we need to pull out all the stops to tell MPs to side with Canadians, do the right thing, and vote against this reckless, dangerous, and ineffective legislation.

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