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Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- David Blanchflower notes that there’s virtually no dispute that the UK is headed into an economic downturn – meaning that there’s also no excuse to hold off on fiscal relief for the public. And Brad DeLong po… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

The Progressive Economics Forum: Boosting the economy for the rest of us

Elites and the talking heads in the media are arguing about how to respond to Canada’s soured economic outlook. Who should try to boost the economy, the federal government via fiscal stimulus or the Bank of Canada via monetary policy? But while elites argue amongst themselves, the overriding context is a transfer and concentration of […] . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Boosting the economy for the rest of us

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.- Rosemary Barton reports on the Libs’ announcement of increased funding to help developing countries fight climate change – which does represent a noteworthy improvement on the Cons’ comparative stinginess. But as… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Alberta Politics: Reaction to this afternoon’s Budget Speech is bound to be completely predictable

ILLUSTRATIONS: A mosaic planned for some future Legislature renovation showing the Opposition and Government positions on the budget. Below: A scene from the Kabuki theatre in which actors portraying Premier Rachel Notley and Finance Minister Joe Ceci contemplate the books left them by the PC government … or something. Below that: Finance Minister Joe Ceci . . . → Read More: Alberta Politics: Reaction to this afternoon’s Budget Speech is bound to be completely predictable

CuriosityCat: Trudeau’s massive $125 Billion Infrastructure Plan gains traction among voters

Nick Nanos

Just in time for the second debate tonight, Nanos has come out with a poll dealing with voters’s views of what is needed to stimulate the economy. You can link to the Nanos study through the Toronto Star article.    IT IS WORTH READING, AND WORTH SHARING. What is clear is that . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Trudeau’s massive $125 Billion Infrastructure Plan gains traction among voters

CuriosityCat: Election 2015: X marks the spot

Here’s my current expectation of the possible seat wins around one week before the October 19 election. I’ve added an X – to mark the right hand border of my forecast – to the CBC/308 instructive Poll Tracker chart: X marks my spot for positions one week before the election on October 19

. . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Election 2015: X marks the spot

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on Donna Harpauer and the Saskatchewan Party are dismissing their own advisory group’s recommendation to work to cut Saskatchewan poverty in half by the end of the decade.

For further reading…– The StarPhoenix echoes Donna Harpauer’s defeatism.– Danielle Martin and Ryan Meili make the case for a basic income, which appears as one of . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

The Progressive Economics Forum: Rochon Asks: “Is the Canadian economy unraveling?”

In a recent CBC blog post, Louis-Philippe Rochon assesses the current state of the Canadian economy.

The link to the blog post is here.

Follow him on Twitter @Lprochon.

The Progressive Economics Forum: Why the economy sucks (in one chart)

(The following is something I’ve prepared for the next issue of CUPE’s Economy at Work, a popular economics quarterly publication I produce.)

In his annual Economic and Fiscal Update (EFU), finance minister Joe Oliver told Canadians that while the federal government will finally record a surplus next year after seven years of deficits, we can’t . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Why the economy sucks (in one chart)

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Brad Wall is kicking Ontario while it’s down by demanding that it let stimulus funding leak out of a province which actually needs it – and how Saskatchewan and other provinces stand to suffer too if Wall helps the Cons impose similar restrictions across the country.

For further reading…– The Leader-Post reported . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

The Progressive Economics Forum: Flaherty’s Legacy: Ideological, reckless and just plain lucky

This piece was originally published at the Globe and Mail’s online Report on Business feature, EconomyLab.

There are two reasons why it is difficult to comment on the legacy of a finance minister.

1) It is a tremendously challenging job, anywhere, any time. Stewarding one of the largest economies in the world through a . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Flaherty’s Legacy: Ideological, reckless and just plain lucky

The Progressive Economics Forum: Polozogistics: Nine Thoughts About the Choice of the New Bank of Canada Governor

 

1. He’s Number Two: Stephen Poloz was widely acknowledged in economic and political circles as the second-best choice for the top job at the Bank of Canada. So the surprise was not that he was chosen. The surprise was, Why Not Tiff Macklem? Will someone please find out and tell the rest of us?

. . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Polozogistics: Nine Thoughts About the Choice of the New Bank of Canada Governor

The Progressive Economics Forum: Great Divergence or Financialized recovery ?

The IMF’s latest delivery of the World Economic outlook contains an interesting analysis of the current “non” recovery in terms of a divergence between fiscal and monetary policy, the first between restrictive and procyclical in nature and the second being accommodating and reinforcing a financial expansion. As argued here by the IMF economists who worked . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Great Divergence or Financialized recovery ?

The Progressive Economics Forum: Happy Crashiversary! Are you better off now than you were four years ago?

Four years after Lehman Brothers collapsed, it’s time to take stock of things by asking a stock political question: Are you better off now than you were four years ago?

Where you stand on the answer depends on where you sit. Many people, businesses and communities are still struggling to regain the ground they lost . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Happy Crashiversary! Are you better off now than you were four years ago?

Should Ontario Become an Independent Country?

Ok just forget how crazy the questions sounds. The recent wrangling between Ontario and Alberta over the value of the Canadian dollar, oil output and the decline of manufacturing in Ontario (and other provinces east of Ontario) raises some reasonable … Continue reading →

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to end your week.

– Sure, it’s a plus to know that Canada’s military is ready and willing to leap into action to protect what matters most to the government of the day. Now if only that meant something other than serving as political operatives to protect the Harper Cons’ interests.

– Which . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: The old cabinet documents ploy #nlpoli #cdnpoli

Premier Kathy Dunderdale and her ministers refuse to hand over documents on more than $5.0 billion in public works spending by the Conservatives since 2004.

The documents are cabinet secrets, as their argument goes, and under the access to information law cabinet cannot release that information to him.

like her predecessor, Premier Dunderdale was unavailable . . . → Read More: The Sir Robert Bond Papers: The old cabinet documents ploy #nlpoli #cdnpoli

The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada Goose Egg

This morning, Statistics Canada reported zero economic growth in October. While growth had been driven by strong mining and fossil-fuel exports during the third quarter, Canadians got a lump of coal in October.

This Christmas goose egg should come as a wake-up call to economic policymakers. It follows Labour Force Surveys showing two consecutive months . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada Goose Egg

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Jim Stanford points out that when it comes to manufacturing, any talk of an “invisible hand” doing much for productivity is based purely on faith rather than evidence: When it comes to Canada’s lousy record in productivity and innovation, the standard prescription of economists is both clear and . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

CuriosityCat: America will benefit if the Supercommittee deadlocks and November 23 passes

Unable to reach agreement on what to cut and by how much, the American governmental Troika (the House, the Senate and the President) struck a Supercommittee consisting of 12 members of Congress (half from each party).The Supercommittee’s mandate is to … . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: America will benefit if the Supercommittee deadlocks and November 23 passes

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament In Review: September 29, 2011

As Parliament heads into a week off, let’s get caught up on what happened in the last couple of weeks before its break – starting with a day that focused on the NDP’s choice of opposition day motions.The Big IssueWhile the Cons have spent nearly all of… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament In Review: September 29, 2011

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your midweek reading.- Erin compares the stimulative effects of Ontario’s election platforms:A multiplier is the amount by which a dollar of budgetary outlay increases Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The federal Department of F… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ontario’s Stimulating Election Platforms

A common refrain among political pundits has been that all of Ontario’s election platforms are unrealistic given a deteriorating economic outlook. Rather than bemoaning this alleged lack of realism, we should evaluate how each party’s platform would fare in a downturn. The NDP platform is built on the fiscal framework set out in the 2011 […] . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Ontario’s Stimulating Election Platforms

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.- David Olive weighs in on the disastrous results of the all-too-prevalent obsession with austerity when economic conditions are still fragile around the globe:From London to Berlin, and Ottawa to Washington, the w… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Erin catches a typically-partisan response from the Cons to the prospect that a new U.S. stimulus package might contain Buy American provisions once again:What strikes me is that corporate Canada and Conservatives ar… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links