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Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Mainly Macro offers a useful definition of neoliberalism, while highlighting its relationship to austerity. And Ed Finn writes that we shouldn’t be too quick to presume neoliberalism is going to disappear just because it’s proven to be harmful in practice – and that it will take a massive . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

CuriosityCat: Robocon: Why Law Professors will rub their hands with glee over the Commissioner’s Report

Counsellor Shrybman: The Doubter

One thing is for sure: for the next two decades or more, constitutional law professors in every law university in Canada will be rubbing their hands in delight at being able to present to law students the report of a commissioner into electoral fraud, and a point-by-point analysis of the . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Robocon: Why Law Professors will rub their hands with glee over the Commissioner’s Report

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Mike Konczal discusses the distribution of U.S. tax breaks and incentives, and finds that measures normally presented as offering breaks for everybody in fact serve mostly as giveaways to the wealthy: (T)he government is very responsive to the interests of the top 20 to 40 percent of Americans, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– The Broadbent Institute has released a new set of polling (PDF) as to Canadians’ values. And it’s particularly worth noting that even on the Cons’ signature issues such as tax cuts, austerity and crime – where millions upon millions of public dollars have been spent in a . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– As would-be frackers show us exactly why it’s dangerous to give the corporate sector a veto over government action, Steven Shrybman suggests that corporations are mostly doing only what we’d expect in exploiting agreements designed to prioritize profits over people: Canadian businesses are simply playing by the rules . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading.

– Ian Lovett reports on the use of “capital appreciation bonds” in California to ensure that future generations pay an inflated price to private-sector developers for infrastructure today.

– Justin Ling’s review of Joyce Murray’s message about electoral non-competition pacts is well worth a read – but I’ll . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

CuriosityCat: Robocon: Conservative Party lawyer raises champerty

Steven Shrybman

The court case dealing with possible voter suppression in 8 ridings during the May 2011 federal election is starting to fascinating. Right off the bat, the Conservative Party lawyer has tried to nullify the role of the Council of Canadians by claiming that there was a whiff of champerty in the air: . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Robocon: Conservative Party lawyer raises champerty

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Eric Liu and Nick Hanauer theorize that we should discuss the economy as a garden rather than a machine: A well-designed tax system — in which everyone contributes and benefits — ensures that nutrients are circulated widely to fertilize and foster growth. Reducing taxes on the very wealthiest . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links