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Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Christopher Majka reviews Henry Mintzberg’s Rebalancing Society as a noteworthy discussion of the need for balance between the public, private and “plural” sectors. And David Madland is pleased to see the U.S.’ Democrats finally fighting back against the view that the corporate sector is the only one . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, looking at the sad similarities between Regina and Detroit, and noting that the crucial step we should take to avoid the latter’s humanitarian tragedy is to fund our commitments to workers and residents while we have the means to do so.

For further reading…– Tom McKay and Wallace Turbeville each discuss how the decision . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Peter Buffett rightly questions the trend toward making the provision of basic necessities subordinate to a corporate mindset, rather than putting human needs first: As more lives and communities are destroyed by the system that creates vast amounts of wealth for the few, the more heroic it . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Ray Grigg explains how Idle No More and other decentralized social movements may make for a crucial counterweight to the Harper Cons and their command-and-control philosophy: Systems are always bigger and more complex than the individuals who try to control them. So political systems, like ecological ones, can . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week.

– Maude Barlow offers some background to the Common Causes protests happening across Canada this week: Over the last two years, we have witnessed amazing organizing and mobilizing in Canada — from student movements in Québec, to the “Defend Our Coast” struggle against tar sands pipelines in British Columbia, to scientists . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Raz Godelnik challenges the all-too-conventional wisdom that corporations (and indeed individuals) should see tax avoidance and evasion as virtues: One of the most common arguments is that the tax-avoidance techniques used by corporations like Starbucks or Google are legal and therefore they’re not to be blamed, but the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: On upcoming decisions

Others have rightly taken umbrage at the use of this weekend’s Saskatchewan Roughriders game to try to push a new stadium on Regina voters. But while I’ll agree the ‘Riders’ move was unseemly, it’s at least arguably within the mandate of a privately-controlled organization which stands to get what amounts to a massive subsidy to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On upcoming decisions

Accidental Deliberations: #withoutanewstadium

I’ve written plenty about Regina’s municipal election over the past few days. But I’ll take some time to encourage readers to join the conversation as early voting approaches.

With the City having released a stadium design concept at the start of the election campaign, it’s been far too easy to fall into the trap of . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: #withoutanewstadium

Accidental Deliberations: On blurred lines

In today’s Leader-Post, John Hopkins responds to this week’s column. But while he tries to point some fingers away from the Regina Chamber of Commerce, he only raises larger issues as to the relationship between the Chamber and the City.

In effect, Hopkins argues that it wasn’t the Chamber that copied the City’s “Regina Votes” . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On blurred lines

Accidental Deliberations: Deep thought

I’m pretty sure the monorail salesmen concerned business interests spending so much money equating “keeping Regina growing” with “sticking Regina with the tab for a new stadium” will start showing their evidence linking the two any day now. Yesiree, any day now…

Accidental Deliberations: On single issues

Apparently today is Stadium Cheerleading Day in the Leader-Post. But in correctly noting that this fall’s election will be decisive in determining whether a stadium goes ahead, Bruce Johnstone seems to me to give away the real choice voters face: Of course, this doesn’t mean that the stadium is the only issue in the coming . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On single issues

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Regina City Council’s attempt to use the same old spin to sell yet another stadium plan (which leaves most of the cost and all of the risk with the city) might be the breaking point for public trust in then current Councillors.

For further reading…

The provincial stadium concept review rejecting an . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Zach Carter shines a spotlight on the few types of interests who stand to gain from austerity: But the austerity game also has winners. Cutting or eliminating government programs that benefit the less advantaged has long been an ideological goal of conservatives. Doing so also generates a tidy . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On rubber stamps

There’s been plenty of coverage from last night’s Regina City Council meeting, with more surely to come. But aside from the complete refusal of any current Council member to respond to the concerns of the delegations who suggested giving citizens some say in a stadium proposal, perhaps the most striking comment is this one: Audience . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On rubber stamps

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Joe Stiglitz discusses the link between increased inequality and the U.S.’ economic frailty: Any solution to today’s problems requires addressing the economy’s underlying weakness: a deficiency in aggregate demand. Firms won’t invest if there is no demand for their products. And one of the key reasons for lack . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On failed strategies

Let’s follow up with one more point from Bruce Johnstone’s attempt to justify ramming through a stadium deal without any serious public input – which speaks less to the stadium project than to the bona fides of the politicians who are pushing it: Is it perfect? No, because unlike some places, like Texas or Indiana, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On failed strategies

Accidental Deliberations: On known unknowns

Others have already weighed in on City Council’s rush to lock in a stadium plan before anybody has a chance to ask serious questions about it. But let’s take a closer look at what looks to be the most important additional question beyond the ones I already identified here.

Bruce Johnstone’s defence of the agreement . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On known unknowns

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Vaughn Palmer discusses the unfortunate gap between the outrages that may lead to a government being pushed out of power, and a new government’s ability to actually reverse what’s been done. Which, a propos of nothing, makes it rather important to push lame-duck incumbents to respect the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Michael Harris continues to highlight some of the fundamental problems with the Cons’ view of politics, this time identifying Stephen Harper as being afflicted with “master of the universe syndrome”: When you control all the levers of power, when you have no scruples, when you are surrounded by . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On ballpark figures

John Klein and Marian Donnelly have already raised some important questions about this weekend’s stadium funding announcement. But while the biggest problem with the announcement may well be just how obvious it is that some key issues haven’t yet been worked out in the slightest, I’ll toss a couple more into the mix.

First, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On ballpark figures

Accidental Deliberations: On unanswered questions

Having written just a couple of days ago as to what I’d hope to see from the City of Regina in a new stadium plan, I’ll take a few minutes to point out how the latest “revitalization initiative” stacks up.

The good news is that we’re no longer seeing any pretense that the funding will . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On unanswered questions

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the latest attempt by the City of Regina to lump a stadium into several other unrelated plans in an attempt to win higher-level funding – and the need for citizens to instead assess it on its own merits.

And for some of the history of past efforts (at all levels of government) . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day