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Montreal Simon: Why I Might Vote for the Liberals in the Ontario Election.

With just two days before the Ontario election, and still not having decided whether to vote for the NDP or the Liberals, I decided to check out the lawn signs on the island, which is part of Trinity-Spadina riding.And the results were no surprise. The island is still mostly orange, with a touch of green. The only blue signs are the ones from the No Jets at the Toronto Island Airport campaign.And between that and the hypnotic scent of the giant ORANGE poppies…

For a moment I thought I might be able to vote for the NDP, for sentimental (Read more…)

Left Over: Harper: The Working Class Can Kiss My….

 

Minimum wage in Canada: One woman’s story No fancy meals and no vacations: ‘I am working poor’

CBC News Posted: Jan 14, 2014 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Jan 14, 2014 7:06 AM ET

 

 

This is an article that could have been written forty-odd years ago, when I arrived on Canada’s doorstep as an immigrant. Knew that I would have to start at the bottom because citizens got the preferred jobs…and that was acceptable to me.

Over the years, I worked at several not-so-great jobs, got a University degree…and immediately found my final job as a labourer..a (Read more…)

calgaryliberal.com: Still not listening to cities.

The Redford Conservatives may have changed Municipal Affairs ministers but they have not changed the way they’re engaging with cities. One of the key complaints of Nenshi and urban dwellers throughout Alberta is that our tax system is fundamentally flawed for cities. We have an outdated system of collecting taxes at the local municipal level […]

ParliamANT Hill: Minister sorry for remarks about hungry children

Inspired by these headlines: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/james-moore-sorry-for-remarks-about-hungry-children-1.2465666 and http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/ontario-to-go-it-alone-after-cpp-reform-stalls-1.2465619

Left Over: More Layoffs/Less Service? Happy Holidays!

Canada Post to phase out urban home mail delivery Up to 8,000 jobs will be cut, while cost of stamps is going up

CBC News Posted: Dec 11, 2013 9:37 AM ET Last Updated: Dec 11, 2013 11:53 AM ET

 

There is something the Feds find irresistible about throwing out some bad news when they are under the gun already from some other bad news…if it’s ugly, anti-worker and beyond inconvenient for the general public, why, it must be Christmastime in Canada, and Emperor Steve, once again, bestows his reverse benevolence on us all..

Just too fascinating..hope the Feds (Read more…)

Montreal Simon: The Con War on the Canada Pension Plan

It's my nightmare vision of a Con jungle. A country full of seniors living in poverty and misery. A country where the old and the poor have no present, and the young have no future.A nightmare that became even more real today, when the Cons killed an NDP proposal to expand the Canada Pension Plan.Even though a recent study showed that Canada is the only OECD country where seniors are getting getting poorer, and the government is doing less and less to help them.

And the only good thing I can see, is that some seniors are (Read more…)

Left Over: ‘Trade Deal’ Sure Isn’t the “New Deal”

 

5 ways the Canada-EU trade deal will impact Canadians

By Susana Mas, CBC News Posted: Oct 18, 2013 9:16 PM ET Last Updated: Oct 19, 2013 8:03 AM ET

 

 

I trust Harper even less than I trusted Mulroney, and I didn’t trust him at all… Why is something so ‘momentous’ not put to a referendum in this country? Why do we not get the facts long before these sorts of agreements are signed, sealed and delivered? Probably because, just like NAFTA, the bad far outweighs the ‘good’… I notice that all our prices of goods are more expensive than (Read more…)

The Progressive Economics Forum: Homelessness Policy

This afternoon, I gave a presentation on public policy responding to homelessness in Canada, with a focus on the past decade. I gave the presentation at this year’s annual conference of the Ontario Non-Profit Housing Association.

Points I made in the presentation include the following:

-Once inflation is accounted for, the current annual value of federal funding for homelessness programming (now known as the Homelessness Partnering Strategy) has eroded to roughly 36% of its original value (that is, its value in 1999 when it was known as the National Homelessness Initiative).

-In recent years, it has become trendy (Read more…)

Scripturient: Blog & Commentary: The Eyes Have It

This summer my mother was diagnosed with macular degeneration. There is no cure. It is irreversible. It simply progresses. Science has some hope for future cures, and has some treatments to slow the progress, but a cure likely won’t come soon enough for her. At 93, one expects that the body will fail, that organs […]

Montreal Simon: 80-year-old Woman Tasered in Ontario

I must admit I didn't think that police in Otario could stoop any lower than the public execution of Sammy Yatim. For its senseless brutality stunned me. But then so does this. Ontario's police watchdog is investigating after officers deployed a Taser on an 80-year-old woman in Mississauga, Ont. Read more »

The Canadian Progressive: BC’s wheelchair fee for seniors in long-term care facilities not fair: Researcher

Janine Farrell, a seniors care researcher at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, explains why the recently announced $25/month user fee for wheelchairs used by people in long-term care facilities in BC is not fair.

The post BC’s wheelchair fee for seniors in long-term care facilities not fair: Researcher appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Montreal Simon: Pierre Poilievre and The Con War on Pensions

I have to admit that I have always disliked Pierre Poilievre. Something about him rubs me the wrong way.He's abrasive, he's yappy, he's arrogant. He looks and acts like a weird old young guy trapped in the Cold War era. And his recent comment that the "root cause of terrorism is terrorism" only reinforced my belief that he is a brutish right-wing ideologue.As well as an absolute idiot.Read more »

Montreal Simon: Jim Flaherty and the Theatre of Cruelty

You might think that Jim Flaherty would be satisfied with ramming through his latest Trojan Horse budget.His ghastly swollen beast stuffed to the gills with toxic waste.But no. Now he's going after seniors and the Canada Pension Plan. Read more »

Cowichan Conversations: Cowichan NDP MLA Bill Routley Stood Up For Cowichan Seniors And Won!

Richard Hughes-Political Blogger

The BC Liberal attack on seniors through their wrong headed policy of forcing Seniors to take computer driving tests and or road tests in unfamiliar vehicles on unfamiliar Victoria streets has finally been corrected.

Bill Routley and his Constituency Office staff rolled up their sleeves after countless seniors contacted them regarding the very stressful so called DriveABLE approach the Clark government had taken.

Bill Routley Cowichan NDP MLA- Fought BC Liberals over attack on seniors!

Well thanks to Mr. Routley, progress has been made. Still obstacles remain but you can bet on Routley. He is all over this one

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Things Are Good: Seniors Who Are Social Are Healthier

Seniors who lead active lives like playing cards and generally hanging out with friends feel healthier and are healthier than there less social peers. Friends make things fun and keep you fit!

Dr. Nicole Anderson is a clinical neuropsychologist at Baycrest Health Sciences in Toronto, where she’s leading a research project called BRAVO. It looks at the effects of volunteering among adults aged 55 and older from physical, cognitive and social functioning perspectives.

“Engaging in more social activities was related to better self-reported health and less loneliness and more life satisfaction,” Anderson said of the Statistics Canada research. “But that

. . . → Read More: Things Are Good: Seniors Who Are Social Are Healthier

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM - A Blog by Donna Thomson: Caring for the Cancer Patient – Today: Mesothelioma

Recently, I received an email requesting a guest blogger spot on the subject of caregiving for people suffering from Mesothelioma, a type of cancer often caused by exposure to asbestos.  This got me thinking that perhaps we should do a mini-series based on caring for various cancers.  Perhaps a series devoted to caring that is specific to different conditions generally.  What do you think? Here is the first instalment of a series of posts that will appear from time to time devoted to the type of care specific to various conditions.  What is Mesothelioma? Mesothelioma is rare type of . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM – A Blog by Donna Thomson: Caring for the Cancer Patient – Today: Mesothelioma

Left Over: Only in Canada? Pity…..

So, the Supreme Court in the US has ruled…and Obamacare, such as it is, is ‘safe’ for now…

This decision means, practically, nothing regarding a tax, since if one reads the bill, carefully, there are no penalties for not buying in…Medicaid is still in place, as is Medicare, provided, (and here is where it gets interesting) that within a certain time frame, the States opt in to the program, with big Federal subsidies coming their way…if they don’t, they will be financing these programs on their own…and I think it’s a great start, but no, not nearly the same as

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Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 27, 2012

Friday, April 27 saw another day of relatively non-contentious debate on the main bill up for discussion in the House of Commons. But there was plenty of reason to question why the focus would be as narrow as it was.

The Big Issue

That main bill was the Cons’ elder abuse legislation, intended to add a new factor in criminal sentencing where the victim was vulnerable due to age. And both of the opposition parties fully endorsed the bill in substance.

But once again, the Cons’ focus on sentencing raised larger issues as to why they wouldn’t put more

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Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- No, there was never any doubt that any statement which could possibly be interpreted as insufficiently jingoistic in favour of the oil industry was going to give rise to a backlash from the Cons’ oilpatch base. But it’s well worth noting that Thomas Mulcair has had little trouble defending his argument that the cost of environmental damage needs to be priced into all industries – and the “polluter pay” principle looks to be one which can stand up to even the most well-orchestrated spokespuppet attack.

- Which stands in stark contrast to the

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Left Over: Plenty of Jobs in Alberta (Alberta!!!) says Emperor Steve’s Puppet, Flaherty

Here’s good ol’ boy Flaherty warning Canadians that EI will be changed to reflect Alberta and Saskatchewan’s need for labour…as if the government was financing EI in the first place..

They aren’t – it’s financed by employers and labour…not that this has stopped any government from tinkering with the program to bolster their philosophy…

“That means we are going to have to encourage more persons with disabilities to work, more seniors to work, more aboriginal people to work, including young people. We need to get rid of disincentives in the employment insurance system to people joining the workforce.” Flaherty

. . . → Read More: Left Over: Plenty of Jobs in Alberta (Alberta!!!) says Emperor Steve’s Puppet, Flaherty

Accidental Deliberations: On tectonic shifts

I haven’t spent much time discussing the spate of recent polls showing the NDP with a modest lead on the Cons, as those top-line results can easily enough be considered an expected consequence of a tired government trying to force through controversial legislation against a popular new leader. But CARP’s latest member polling demands some comment – as it reflects that the NDP isn’t merely holding roughly the level and type of support it had around the time of the 2011 election, but instead adding a potentially decisive new set of voters to its camp.

By way of comparison, even

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Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: March 26, 2012

Having taken a bit of a hiatus during and after the NDP’s leadership campaign, I’ll resume looking back at what’s happened in the House of Commons starting with the election of Thomas Mulcair. (I’ll plan to return to the previous sitting later on.)

Monday, March 26 saw Mulcair’s introduction as the new Leader of the Official Opposition. But there was plenty worth pointing out beyond the first few questions from Mulcair and associated headlines…

The Big Issue

The main topic of debate was the Cons’ anti-refugee legislation – with the opposition parties particularly taking aim at the concept of

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: March 26, 2012

Montreal Simon: The Lonely Old Man and his Music

When I was in university I used to volunteer once a week at a nursing home in Montreal’s East End. Sébastien used to play the piano and sing French songs, I would play the guitar, my lab Kerouac would lick them all to death. And we all had a hoot.

Except for one woman who would just sit there on her plastic chair looking sad, never said a word, and couldn’t be reached by anyone.

It bothered me a lot. Because if loneliness hurts when you’re young, when you’re old it must be devastating. And if you can’t reach

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The Scott Ross: How Old Age Security Should Have Been Reformed

Instead of raising the retirement age and distressing seniors with low-income the government should have prevented wealthier Canadians from receiving Old Age Security; not only would this have been fairer but would have saved hundereds of millions of dollars more.

It makes sense that Canadians who are 65 and older and who make over a million dollars don’t receive an Old Age Security Pension; they certainly don’t need it. But what doesn’t make sense is that under the current reforms made by this Conservative government, a 67 year old senior who will make $100,000 will still receive OAS while a

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Impolitical: Flaherty to seniors on #OAS

At the 1:30 mark and onwards, Flaherty gives an answer on his OAS age eligibility increase that is receiving some attention tonight. Two callers to the CPAC call-in show that ended at 10:00 p.m. EST remarked on Flaherty’s comment being rude. In tone, the way he emphasized the word “poor” may have drawn attention to what he was saying. Basically, he said that those who would still need OAS at 65 will have to go on provincial assistance, i.e., welfare. He said it so matter of factly and without any sensitivity. The kicker is this: The

. . . → Read More: Impolitical: Flaherty to seniors on #OAS