Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on Brad Wall’s choice to cover up the truth behind the Saskatchewan Party’s Global Transportation Hub scandal – and the most plausible (if still inadequate) explanations for that decision. For further reading…– Again, the latest public revelation was Geoff Leo’s reporting of political pressure to pay inflated prices for land. And Leo also reported ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Rahul Kalvapalle reports on the latest Ipsos poll showing how younger Canadians expect to lead a worse life than the generations who went before them. – PressProgress examines how inequality has been burgeoning under Christy Clark’s B.C. Lib government. And Maimuna Majumder notes that the toxic effects of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Star argues that a crackdown on tax evasion and avoidance is a crucial first step in reining in inequality. Susan Delacourt wonders when, if ever, Chrystia Freeland’s apparent interest in inequality will show up in her role in government. And Vanmala Subramaniam reminds us why the cause ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Linda McQuaig writes about the dangerous spread of privatized health care which threatens to undermine our universal system: Privatization advocates want us to believe public health care is no longer affordable. But in fact, it’s private, for-profit medicine that’s unaffordable. The publicly funded portion of our health ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Alex Hemingway reviews the evidence on two-tiered medicine from around the developed world, and concludes that a constitutional attack on universal health care would only result in our paying more for less. – Marc Lee takes a look at the national climate change framework released last week and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Jacob Levy highlights the importance of “identity politics” – or more specifically, the willingness to fight against systematic inequality of all kinds – as part of an effective progressive movement. And George Monbiot writes that we should be returning to first principles when it comes to the economy, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Ben Casselman points out how corporate consolidation can produce harmful results for consumers and workers alike. Guy Standing discusses how we’re all worse off for the spread of rentier capitalism. And Mariana Mazzucato reminds us that an entrepreneurial government is a must if we want to see general ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Terry Pedwell reports that young workers who were apparently expected to provide Justin Trudeau with a public relations backdrop instead delivered an important dose of reality by protesting his appearance. And Angella MacEwen points out that contrary to the Libs’ spin, there’s in fact plenty a government can ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on Regina’s upcoming municipal election – and the need for voters to break with expectations to elect a municipal government far more willing to stand up for its constituents than the one we’ve had in recent years. For further reading…– Elections Regina’s main page is here. David Robert Loblaw is providing a handy central ...

Accidental Deliberations: Into the dark

Apparently provincial finances have joined monthly job reports as areas where if there’s nothing to be spun in the Saskatchewan Party’s favour, Brad Wall is making a concerted effort to hide what’s going on from the public. (Go on, just try to find the government’s monthly jobs release containing this news – in contrast even ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the City of Regina’s actual treatment of key information runs contrary to its stated commitment to open government. For further reading…– Natascia Lypny’s report on the City’s delays and denials of access to information about Regina’s new stadium and wastewater treatment plant is here.  – I previously wrote about the City’s initial ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Abi Wilkinson argues that we can’t expect to take anger and other emotions out of political conversations when government choices have created nothing but avoidable stress for so many: Actions can certainly be morally unacceptable. In my opinion, emotions cannot. Really, it’s a manifestation of extreme privilege to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Robert Frank comments on the connection between recognizing the luck and social support which lead to one’s own success, and being willing to fund a state which will ensure opportunities for everybody: I’ve seen even brief discussions of the link between success and luck temper the outrage ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Carol Goar summarizes the Institute for Research on Public Policy’s review of the steps needed to rein in inequality in the long term, while pointing out the one factor which will determine whether anything gets done: At first glance, it looks intimidating. But on closer examination, it is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Robert Atkinson discusses the need for corporate tax policy to encourage economic development rather than profit-taking and share inflation. And Jim Hightower notes that it’s an anti-democratic corporate mindset that led to the poisoning of Flint. – Stephen Tapp offers some noteworthy ideas to ensure the public can ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron offers his take on the Paris climate change conference. Martin Lukacs notes that while the agreement reached there may not accomplish anywhere near what we need, the building climate movement should provide more hope than we’ve had to this point. Similarly, Thomas Walkom sees the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Les Leopold rightly argues that financial and political elites won’t offer a more fair distribution of wealth or power unless they’re forced to do so: Right now, we lack a robust mass movement with the power to reclaim our economy and our democracy to make it work for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Emily Dugan writes about the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s finding that young UK adults are facing the worst economic prospects of the last several generations. And Betty Ann Adam reports on Charles Plante’s work on the value of a living wage, both for employers and society at ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – I’ll start in on my own review of the NDP’s election campaign over the next few days, focusing on what I see as being the crucial decisions as the campaign played out. But for those looking for some of what’s been written already, I’ll point out recaps and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Rosemary Barton discusses why it’s in Canada’s best interest on the global stage to work on building strong multilateral institutions (including the UN) rather than counting on bluster to make a difference. But Gus van Harten notes that we’re instead signing onto trade deals including the TPP ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Oxfam points out that without a major redistributive effort, hundreds of millions of people will be trapped in extreme poverty around the globe no matter how much top-end growth is generated.And Michael Valpy writes that the Cons have gone out of their way to stifle any talk ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Haroon Siddiqui comments on the Cons’ tall economic tales. And Steven Chase and Greg Keenan note that workers are rightly fighting back against the Cons’ plan to sell out Canada’s auto parts industry and its 80,000 jobs. – Canadian Doctors for Medicare weighs in with its approval ...

OpenMedia.ca: Truth Out: What’s Going On With the TPP?

TPP Update: After years of secret negotiations, we’ve just learned U.S. Trans-Pacific Partnership officials have decided to appoint a “Chief Transparency Officer.” So who did they pick? One of their own lawyers, Tim Reif. Not exactly encouraging. TPP provisions will grievously hurt the Internet and our right to free expression! We need to speak out at StopTheSecrecy.net/Canada ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Climenhaga sees Jeremy Corbyn’s resounding victory in the Labour leadership race as compelling evidence that progressive hope can win over centre-right fearmongering, while Michael Laxer takes some lessons away for Canadian politics. And Paul Krugman notes that there’s a reason why voting members didn’t take the ...

Accidental Deliberations: On the rule of law

It’s for the best that the Cons’ use of secret orders-in-council is drawing some further attention. But the problem goes further than the Libs’ response seems to suggest – even if it’s obvious why they’re pretending otherwise. Here’s the Libs’ complaint about secret laws: Dion likened the secret OICs to omnibus bills — another legal ...