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daveberta.ca - Alberta politics blog: calgary-centre conservatives and liberals choosing their by-election candidates.

TweetOn Saturday, August 25, Conservative Party members in the riding of Calgary-Centre will choose a candidate to carry their party’s banner in an upcoming and yet-to-be called by-election. Six candidates are contesting the nomination. The Conservative candidate is widely expected to win the by-election in this moderate conservative voting downtown Calgary riding. Here is a . . . → Read More: daveberta.ca – Alberta politics blog: calgary-centre conservatives and liberals choosing their by-election candidates.

David Climenhaga's Alberta Diary: Rumble on the right: Conservative candidates stampede into Calgary Centre

Astonished Calgarians watch as the Calgary Centre Conservative candidates ride into Cowtown. Acutal candidates may not appear exactly as illustrated. Below: Joan Crockatt, Rod Love, John Mar.

By the time the dust settles, at least a dozen candidates are likely to contest the Conservative Party nomination for the federal riding of Calgary Centre.

Now . . . → Read More: David Climenhaga’s Alberta Diary: Rumble on the right: Conservative candidates stampede into Calgary Centre

Alberta Diary: Rumble on the right: Conservative candidates stampede into Calgary Centre

Astonished Calgarians watch as the Calgary Centre Conservative candidates ride into Cowtown. Acutal candidates may not appear exactly as illustrated. Below: Joan Crockatt, Rod Love, John Mar.

By the time the dust settles, at least a dozen candidates are likely to contest the Conservative Party nomination for the federal riding of Calgary Centre.

Now . . . → Read More: Alberta Diary: Rumble on the right: Conservative candidates stampede into Calgary Centre

Cats, Chopsticks, and Rainbows: Ward 4 Interview with Sean Chu

Sean Chu immigrated to Canada in 1985 after three years of military service in Taiwan. He worked for his family’s pizza joint before becoming a police officer. He decided to be involved in politics after having children. He has received the Alberta Centennial Medal for Outstanding Community Service , and picked to be . . . → Read More: Cats, Chopsticks, and Rainbows: Ward 4 Interview with Sean Chu

Cats, Chopsticks, and Rainbows: Ward 4 Interview with Sean Chu

Sean Chu immigrated to Canada in 1985 after three years of military service in Taiwan. He worked for his family’s pizza joint before becoming a police officer. He decided to be involved in politics after having children. He has received the Alberta Centennial Medal for Outstanding Community Service , and picked to be on the Premier’s Calgary Advisory Committee. 
Why are running for alderman in Ward 4?
Chu believes he can make a difference because it is his nature to help people out, and one way to do that is through city council. 
Chu has a variety of volunteer experience, and believes his connections to ward 4 will highlight his involvement. He says that his family and friends all still reside in ward 4 and he wants to give back to that community. 
What does the city look like 100 years from now?
“I envision the city to be five times its size,” says Chu. 
He also envisions a north-central LRT and better traffic flow. Chu cited an article that if traffic flow is improved by 10%, productivity goes up by 25%. He also sees a better bidding process for the city and that there will not be “the ‘f’ (fraud) word.”
Is social media an important driving force, or is it still the voting demographic and the hot issues that dictate the election?
Chu believes that the social media right now is helping solidify its own future.
“I think we are on the way there, but not today,” says Chu. “People still like face to face and door-knocking.”
Chu told CalgaryPoliitcs.com that 70-80% of his signs are on private property as a testament of the power of door-knocking. However, social media has an optimistic political future.
“We are going in the right direction,” says a hopeful Chu. “It’s a trend for the future.”
What was one thing the city did right this term?
Chu believes that city council did the right thing to try and sell and promote Calgary to other cities and overseas. He said you needed a leader to promote the city, and while many bash Bronconnier for going overseas, it was integral for our growth. 
“When you don’t have the little things, you can’t put things together,” says Chu of all the things the city needs to pursue to make it a better city. 
Should municipalities be granted constitutional powers?
“Once you have constitutional powers, if you have the wrong people in power, you might get taxed to death,” warned Chu.
Chu wants to find a way for the city to collect taxes, but a cap should be in place and no hidden taxes should be allowed.
Almost all candidates have preached the importance of transportation. Would you take the bus to work at least once a week if elected? If not, why would you not take it if you are recommending Calgarians should take it?
“When I was a policeman, I took the bus 90% of the time,” says Chu. “If I don’t have to rush from one place to another, I would rather take the bus.”
Chu told CalgaryPolitics.com that he enjoys bus rides while listening to music or reading a book. 
What does your platform include in terms of Aboriginal issues?
Chu does not have specifics on Aboriginal issues, but believes it is still an important one.
“It’s kind of hard because it’s not necessarily a city issue,” says Chu. 
Chu says he wants see programs with actual merit in order for him to consider it, and it would not matter what issue it may be. 
With CCTVs and the public behavior bylaw, do you believe the city has a place for dictating and monitoring the conduct of its citizens?
Chu believes in safety comes first when it boils down to issues like closed-circuit televisions or the public behavior bylaw. 
“It’s not just good for citizens, it’s also good for the homeless,” says Chu.
“As policemen, we have no time to pick on the homeless,” Chu suggested. “We are just like everyone else. We have compassion for them too.”
Chu describes how police officers went out of their way to get shoes for the homeless, and says that police are not trying to segregate any one population.
CCTVs act as witnesses and are useful in deterring crime, says Chu, and he believes it is a partial reason why crime rates have fallen in the down town area.
“If you didn’t commit a crime, you shouldn’t be afraid,” Chu told CalgaryPolitics.com.
This is cross-posted with CalgaryPolitics.com

. . . → Read More: Cats, Chopsticks, and Rainbows: Ward 4 Interview with Sean Chu