Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Purple Library Guy nicely sums up how the financial industry has become completely detached from anything that could be considered useful in generating real economic growth: When you abstract something, it tends to make it possible to do it on a larger scale, with more complexity. And originally, ...

Accidental Deliberations: On mixed contributions

Having pointed out in today’s column that the Saskatchewan NDP’s poor election results were far more readily traced to public perceptions of Dwain Lingenfelter (along with broader party issues) rather than the party’s platform, let’s briefly put Lingenfelter’s leadership in context. The obvious problem for Lingenfelter was a level of negative perception which started out ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Plenty of people who should know better – including Bruce Johnstone and David McGrane – seem eager to paint the results of Saskatchewan’s election as an indication that the NDP should simply run on the Sask Party’s platform rather than advocating for its own values and policies. Today’s column looks to nip that narrative in ...

Accidental Deliberations: The new baseline

In this year’s federal election, the NDP took 32% of the vote in Saskatchewan – but didn’t win a single seat as other parties dropped off the map and the Cons consolidated public support in all but one riding. And in last night’s provincial election, the NDP again took 32% of the vote – only ...

Accidental Deliberations: Setting the tone

We’ll find out soon whether the latest Sask Party vote suppression has any impact one way or another on tonight’s election results. But even if not, it may nonetheless be rather significant in setting the province’s narrative for the next four years. After all, anybody with the least bit of commitment to the idea of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Decision time

It’s election day in Saskatchewan, and time for voters to decide based on a rather stark choice of two sets of priorities: So please vote, and to encourage others to do so. Because by tonight, we won’t be able to have a say at the ballot box until long after it’s too late to make ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saskatchewan Election Update

I won’t reproduce the post here. But see my updated Saskatchewan Election Links for all the information you’ll need for tomorrow’s provincial election.

Accidental Deliberations: Unethical standards

Yes, Geoff Leo’s debunking of Bill Hutchinson’s supposed “mainstreeting” is well worth a view. But I’d think the story deserves to be taken somewhat more seriously than it has been so far. After all, it’s hard to see Hutchinson’s setup as anything but a deliberate attempt to mislead the media and the general public in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – If there’s any good news in the Cons’ constant attacks on labour, it’s the growing recognition that workers need to fight back with no less a concerted effort than they’re facing from a hostile government. And the possibility that the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada ...

Accidental Deliberations: Misled

Angela Hall makes the fatal mistake of presuming that right-wing spin has anything at all to do with reality: Returning to the city where he made a recent campaign promise to crack down on violent offenders, Saskatchewan Party Leader Brad Wall expressed support for Ottawa’s tough on crime bill despite the potential for added costs ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Stephen Maher nicely summarizes Tony Clement’s sad committee appearance yesterday: The evidence shows that Clement chose the projects himself, in some kind of mysterious process in his riding office. He has steadfastly denied that, and even helpfully pointed out to reporters in September why that would have ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on Saskatchewan’s unique opportunity to translate the widespread public concerns about inequality and corporate control highlighted by the Occupy movement into electoral change. For further reading, here’s the Abacus poll referred to in the column.

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – I’d think it’s long past the time where any informed observer could cling to hope that the Harper Cons see good government as a goal worth pursuing. But Dan Gardner points out the role that Parliament should play if they actually did have some interest in that result: ...

Accidental Deliberations: On renegotiations

One of the main arguments against a potash royalty review has been the claim that the 8 years since a 2003 overhaul – in which potash prices have tripled and profits soared – is too short a time frame to consider changes to the royalty system. So let’s consider how long it was that Saskatchewan ...

Accidental Deliberations: On complexities

Bruce Johnstone makes about the best case one possibly can for the Sask Party’s refusal to review potash royalties. But it necessarily misses a rather important point. After all, there’s absolutely no basis to consider the current royalty structure as an essential element to mine development to the extent any given mine would be profitable ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Abacus’ Canadian polling on the Occupy protests suggests that there’s loads of public sympathy for the view that there’s a need for change in how wealth and power is distributed – with the main concern being whether there’s any viable means available to get that done: Large majorities ...

Accidental Deliberations: On decision points

Leftdog rightly points out that the Saskatchewan Party’s sudden, zero-consultation announcement about changing Saskatchewan’s school year looks to be nothing more than a distraction tactic. But let’s note why they would have felt the need to inject any such thing into the campaign: with at least some polling showing the NDP’s call for a potash ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the costliest promise in Saskatchewan’s provincial election. For further reading, see Erin’s platform comparison and comment on potash royalties. Update: Leftdog highlights just how little PCS needs handouts from the province. And I’ll add the usual proviso left out of the column: yes, of course the potash corporations will whine about any royalty ...

Accidental Deliberations: Style vs. substance

The first obvious takeaway from tonight’s Saskatchewan leaders’ debate was the need for both more debate and more debaters. And for all the criticism of the exclusion of other parties’ leaders, the bigger issue may have been a painfully shortened format that allowed for only minimal discussion of any topic (especially when substantial portions of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your afternoon reading. – Lawrence Martin argues that with an NDP Official Opposition at the same time as the effects of inequality and greed continue to send shockwaves across the globe, there’s no time like the present for Canada to debate higher taxes as the price of needed public services: As the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Romeo Saganash comments on the need to recognize and act on our common social bonds: Whether you live on reserve, in the remote north, or in the heart of a city, there is much healing — much teaching and learning — that needs to be done. I carry ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Erin compares the numbers behind the NDP and Sask Party platforms, with the one major difference being the windfall potash profits the Wall government wants to keep out of public hands. – Bruce Johnstone highlights a few more of the harmful effects that figure to follow from ...

Accidental Deliberations: Burning questions

Has any government, anywhere, ever done as little in a four-year term as the Saskatchewan Party will admit to planning in its platform? Does anybody expect the Saskatchewan Party to break the mould? And if not, what’s been left out of the platform that’s actually on Brad Wall’s agenda for the next four years? (Handy ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Frances Woolley points out just how much more efficient public-sector health services are compared to private-sector alternatives by contrasting the cost of surgery on people with the far higher rates charged to private payors for veterinary services. – Which leads nicely into Erin’s critique of the Saskatchewan Party’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

It’s bad enough having a federal government whose reaction to social problems is to tell the provinces, “No, you go first in dealing with them. I insist.” But it’s much worse having a provincial government whose response is to refuse to do anything more than copy what the federal government is doing. Hence today’s column, ...