Accidental Deliberations: Burning questions

How does a new U.S. president focusing on actual protectionism (not “trade barriers” in the form of the incidental effects of governance in the public interest) affect the viability of Brad Wall’s GTH and bypass projects which depend on perpetually expanding trade? And are we stuck with the multi-billion-dollar costs the Saskatchewan Party has tried ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrew Jackson writes that the Libs’ fall economic statement represents a massive (and unjustified) shift away from promised infrastructure funding even while planning to privatize both existing operations and future developments. And Joie Warnock highlights why it would represent nothing short of scandalous mismanagement for the Wall ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Neil Irwin examines one of the key ideas underlying the U.S. Democrats’ economic plans, being that workers need to have meaningful choices rather than being trapped by a limited and slanted set of available employers and work structures: Labor market monopsony is the idea that when there isn’t ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – John McDonnell outlines a progressive alternative to neoliberal economic policy: The increasing automation of jobs, reduced dependence on carbon fuels, artificial intelligence and the so-called gig economy have provoked understandable anger among many workers whose jobs are under threat. More generally, concerns about the effect on the labour market are ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on what we need to do to clean up political funding – and how both the Saskatchewan and federal systems offer painful examples of the problems with big money in politics. For further reading…– Brad Wall’s top-up pay from the Saskatchewan Party – being one of the many noteworthy uses of the corporate and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Toby Sanger offers some important background to the federal government’s expected plan for privatized infrastructure by noting that the anticipated result would be to double the costs. And Luke Kawa notes that the Libs are already having trouble spending the money they’ve budgeted for infrastructure – leaving ...

Accidental Deliberations: Deceptive by definition

The Saskatchewan Party’s introduction of new legislation (Bill 40, PDF) to define massive Crown sell-offs as not being “privatization” has received plenty of due attention. But it’s worth taking a close look at exactly what the Wall government is doing – and how it reflects an attempt to sneak the change through the back door ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Larry Beinhart argues that aside from the gross unfairness and economic harm from growing inequality, there’s a basic problem trusting the uber-rich to make reasonable decisions with massive amounts of wealth. And George Monbiot makes the case that even as he pretends to be an outsider, Donald ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Ben Casselman points out how corporate consolidation can produce harmful results for consumers and workers alike. Guy Standing discusses how we’re all worse off for the spread of rentier capitalism. And Mariana Mazzucato reminds us that an entrepreneurial government is a must if we want to see general ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Brad Wall’s call for Canada to stop funding international climate change adaptation and mitigation reflects just one more example of his government’s tendency to kick down at the people least able to defend themselves. For further reading…– Gregory Beatty again documented the background to Wall’s abandonment of an equalization system which would ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Vanessa Williamson writes that plenty of Americans want to see wealthy individuals and corporations pay their fair share of taxes – only to have that strong desire ignored by policymakers. And Joseph Stiglitz and Erika Siu discuss the glaring need for stronger tax enforcement around the globe. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Bruce Johnstone notes that rather than further attacking public services which have already been under siege throughout his stay in office, Brad Wall and his government should be looking to question Saskatchewan’s inexplicable giveaways to businesses: Well, if Doherty is looking for some “low-hanging fruit” to make our ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: A Tax on Everything Is Coming

Run for the hills! .@CNN #PriceOnCarbon article: "because we've been so slow to act on this crisis, bold action is now required" https://t.co/PvV1Y1oFdM — Pembina Institute (@Pembina) October 5, 2016 I realize several people who I’m friends with, think Premier Wall is great for Saskatchewan. I’ve never held a high opinion of the man, I ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – In The Public Interest studies how the privatization of services leads to increased inequality: In the Public Interest’s analysis of recent government contracting identifies five ways in which government privatization disproportionately hurts poor individuals and families… Creation of new user fees: The creation of new user fees to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Into the dark

Apparently provincial finances have joined monthly job reports as areas where if there’s nothing to be spun in the Saskatchewan Party’s favour, Brad Wall is making a concerted effort to hide what’s going on from the public. (Go on, just try to find the government’s monthly jobs release containing this news – in contrast even ...

Accidental Deliberations: In case we didn’t have enough reasons to want Donald Trump to be trounced…

…he’s now serving as Brad Wall’s latest excuse for climate obstructionism. We’ll see if anyone asks the implied follow-up question: whether Wall is actually hoping for a Trump win on the basis that a bigoted lunatic trying to squeeze still more money and power out of the working classes to be sent to the top ...

Accidental Deliberations: On available alternatives

Shorter Murray Mandryk: A poll which shows the NDP picking up support from dissatisfied Saskatchewan Party voters proves my point that the NDP can’t possibly pick up support from dissatisfied Saskatchewan Party voters.

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Erin Seatter interviews Adam Lynes-Ford about Brian Day’s latest attack on universal Medicare. And Ricochet’s editorial board highlights how Day is ultimately fighting only to exacerbate inequality: Discrimination against racialized and Indigenous patients fosters health disparities across our country and sometimes leads to death. Poverty hurts Indigenous ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations: The EC is also investigating state support received by Amazon and McDonalds in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations: The EC is also investigating state support received by Amazon and McDonalds in ...

Accidental Deliberations: On cost comparisons

Following up on yesterday’s column, let’s take a moment to examine just how foolish the Wall government’s insistence on trying to sell off SaskTel is even as a matter of pure dollars and cents. Again, I’ve previously calculated the benefit to Saskatchewan consumers with SaskTel wireless plans at $396 million per year. But that was ...

Accidental Deliberations: On cost comparisons

Following up on yesterday’s column, let’s take a moment to examine just how foolish the Wall government’s insistence on trying to sell off SaskTel is even as a matter of pure dollars and cents. Again, I’ve previously calculated the benefit to Saskatchewan consumers with SaskTel wireless plans at $396 million per year. But that was ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how we shouldn’t believe any of the unenforceable promises Brad Wall and his government will make to try to pitch a SaskTel selloff – and how citizens stand to lose out from a sale. For further reading…– CBC reported on Wall’s going out of his way to push privatization – including confirmation that ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how we shouldn’t believe any of the unenforceable promises Brad Wall and his government will make to try to pitch a SaskTel selloff – and how citizens stand to lose out from a sale. For further reading…– CBC reported on Wall’s going out of his way to push privatization – including confirmation that ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Buying Coal Time, Burns Ours

2. Because if coal's "demise" is anything like Big Tobacco's, the industry didn't shut down after lawmakers' cracked down some. — Saskboy (@saskboy) August 26, 2016 Man bites dog:#Coal industry executive in secret meeting tells allies to stop denying #climatechange.https://t.co/fpiO0EfDBd — Tim Ream (@ourcarbon) August 26, 2016 Zimmerman seized on Reavey’s “poor/no science” line when ...