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Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Libs’ pleasantly surprising hints toward enforcing the Canada Health Act – and the Saskatchewan Party’s response that it would rather fight for profit-motivated medicine than work on building a sustainable universal system.

For further reading…– By way of background on the enforcement of the Canada Health Act at the federal level, see . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Lana Payne comments on the importance of the labour movement in ensuring that economic growth translates into benefits for workers: The findings of a study released this month by the Canadian Centre for Study of Living Standards, an Ottawa-based think-tank, reinforces why there is a “pervasive sense among . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: On advance opportunities

And now, time to give credit to the Saskatchewan Party where it’s due.

Some people are justifiably anticipating that thanks to Donald Trump, self-dealing will be the word of the year to come. @MikePMoffatt @nutgraf1 I’m waiting for the OED to make “self-dealing” Word of the Year for 2017.

— Ian Gillespie (@IanRGillespie) November . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On advance opportunities

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the Wall government has Saskatchewan on the road to the same post-truth politics that laid the groundwork for the spread of fictitious “news” and Donald Trump’s election.

For further reading…– Dan Tynan, Craig Silverman and Terrence McCoy are among those who have reported on the development of a new strain of . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Juxtaposition

Brad Wall is perfectly happy to waste time tweeting his outrage at a business operating with both foreign and domestic suppliers.

But Brad Wall couldn’t care less whether provincial money earmarked to clean up messes in Saskatchewan actually stays in the province – choosing instead to cut out local businesses entirely: The province’s Saskatchewan Oil . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Juxtaposition

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– The Star argues that Canada can’t afford to leave tax loopholes wide open for the rich – as the Libs are doing in violation of their campaign promises. And Martin Lukacs notes that obscene giveaways to the rich seem to be the top priority for Justin Trudeau . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

Accidental Deliberations: Burning questions

How does a new U.S. president focusing on actual protectionism (not “trade barriers” in the form of the incidental effects of governance in the public interest) affect the viability of Brad Wall’s GTH and bypass projects which depend on perpetually expanding trade?

And are we stuck with the multi-billion-dollar costs the Saskatchewan Party has tried . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Burning questions

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Andrew Jackson writes that the Libs’ fall economic statement represents a massive (and unjustified) shift away from promised infrastructure funding even while planning to privatize both existing operations and future developments. And Joie Warnock highlights why it would represent nothing short of scandalous mismanagement for the Wall . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Neil Irwin examines one of the key ideas underlying the U.S. Democrats’ economic plans, being that workers need to have meaningful choices rather than being trapped by a limited and slanted set of available employers and work structures: Labor market monopsony is the idea that when there isn’t . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– John McDonnell outlines a progressive alternative to neoliberal economic policy: The increasing automation of jobs, reduced dependence on carbon fuels, artificial intelligence and the so-called gig economy have provoked understandable anger among many workers whose jobs are under threat. More generally, concerns about the effect on the labour market are . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on what we need to do to clean up political funding – and how both the Saskatchewan and federal systems offer painful examples of the problems with big money in politics.

For further reading…– Brad Wall’s top-up pay from the Saskatchewan Party – being one of the many noteworthy uses of the corporate and . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Toby Sanger offers some important background to the federal government’s expected plan for privatized infrastructure by noting that the anticipated result would be to double the costs. And Luke Kawa notes that the Libs are already having trouble spending the money they’ve budgeted for infrastructure – leaving . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Deceptive by definition

The Saskatchewan Party’s introduction of new legislation (Bill 40, PDF) to define massive Crown sell-offs as not being “privatization” has received plenty of due attention. But it’s worth taking a close look at exactly what the Wall government is doing – and how it reflects an attempt to sneak the change through the back door . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Deceptive by definition

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Larry Beinhart argues that aside from the gross unfairness and economic harm from growing inequality, there’s a basic problem trusting the uber-rich to make reasonable decisions with massive amounts of wealth. And George Monbiot makes the case that even as he pretends to be an outsider, Donald . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Ben Casselman points out how corporate consolidation can produce harmful results for consumers and workers alike. Guy Standing discusses how we’re all worse off for the spread of rentier capitalism. And Mariana Mazzucato reminds us that an entrepreneurial government is a must if we want to see general . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Brad Wall’s call for Canada to stop funding international climate change adaptation and mitigation reflects just one more example of his government’s tendency to kick down at the people least able to defend themselves.

For further reading…– Gregory Beatty again documented the background to Wall’s abandonment of an equalization system which . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Vanessa Williamson writes that plenty of Americans want to see wealthy individuals and corporations pay their fair share of taxes – only to have that strong desire ignored by policymakers. And Joseph Stiglitz and Erika Siu discuss the glaring need for stronger tax enforcement around the globe.

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week.

– Bruce Johnstone notes that rather than further attacking public services which have already been under siege throughout his stay in office, Brad Wall and his government should be looking to question Saskatchewan’s inexplicable giveaways to businesses: Well, if Doherty is looking for some “low-hanging fruit” to make our . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: A Tax on Everything Is Coming

Run for the hills!

.@CNN #PriceOnCarbon article: "because we've been so slow to act on this crisis, bold action is now required" https://t.co/PvV1Y1oFdM

— Pembina Institute (@Pembina) October 5, 2016

I realize several people who I’m friends with, think Premier Wall is great for Saskatchewan. I’ve never held a high opinion of . . . → Read More: Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: A Tax on Everything Is Coming

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– In The Public Interest studies how the privatization of services leads to increased inequality: In the Public Interest’s analysis of recent government contracting identifies five ways in which government privatization disproportionately hurts poor individuals and families… Creation of new user fees: The creation of new user fees to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Into the dark

Apparently provincial finances have joined monthly job reports as areas where if there’s nothing to be spun in the Saskatchewan Party’s favour, Brad Wall is making a concerted effort to hide what’s going on from the public. (Go on, just try to find the government’s monthly jobs release containing this news – in contrast even . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Into the dark

Accidental Deliberations: In case we didn’t have enough reasons to want Donald Trump to be trounced…

…he’s now serving as Brad Wall’s latest excuse for climate obstructionism. We’ll see if anyone asks the implied follow-up question: whether Wall is actually hoping for a Trump win on the basis that a bigoted lunatic trying to squeeze still more money… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: In case we didn’t have enough reasons to want Donald Trump to be trounced…

Accidental Deliberations: On available alternatives

Shorter Murray Mandryk:A poll which shows the NDP picking up support from dissatisfied Saskatchewan Party voters proves my point that the NDP can’t possibly pick up support from dissatisfied Saskatchewan Party voters. . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On available alternatives

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Erin Seatter interviews Adam Lynes-Ford about Brian Day’s latest attack on universal Medicare. And Ricochet’s editorial board highlights how Day is ultimately fighting only to exacerbate inequality:

Discrimination against racialized and Indigenous patients fosters health disparities across our country and sometimes leads to death.

Poverty hurts Indigenous people in particular, and it’s understandable if you think the wide income gap between them and other groups in our country means privatized health care will leave them behind.

But fret not. Privatization will give them the kick they need to find their bootstraps. Want health care? Make money. Want a physician to check for diabetes instead of assuming you’re drunk? Hand over dollar bills, preferably the red or brown ones. Just throw yourself into the capitalist economy, and you’ll soon get past all that labour discrimination and be able to fork out the cash to be treated right.

Like Ali, and like the founding father of oppressive medicare, Tommy Douglas, Day used to be a boxer too.

“If you’re competitive and you think you’re right, you want to keep going until there’s a final outcome,” said Day.

That’s why he won’t stop until universal health care is down for the count.

– Oliver Milman discusses the climate effects of rapidly increasing ocean temperatures. And Merran Smith and Dan Woynillowicz comment on the need for Canada to pull its weight in shifting to clean renewable energy, while Jackie Wattles and Matt Egan point to Oklahoma’s rash of earthquakes as yet another consequence of insisting on chasing fossil fuels against all rational analysis.

– But Ethan Lou reports that the Trudeau Libs are instead aiming to grease the skids for foreign-owned oil development.

– Tammy Robert exposes the Wall government’s use of federal immigration funding (backed by provincial guarantees) to inflate a housing bubble. And the Leader-Post’s editorial board questions why the Saskatchewan Party is picking the pockets of school divisions and health regions.

– Finally, Kiran Rana takes note of the difficult job market facing new university graduates. . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations:The E… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links