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Bill Longstaff: Calling the bluff on "we must compete in the global marketplace"

The soul-numbing mantra “we must compete in the global marketplace” is much heard these days. Conservative politicians and business groups toss it out tirelessly as an argument to reduce taxes, and weaken labour and environmental laws. Unfortunately, their argument is valid. Trade agreements have so reduced the ability of national governments to tax and to . . . → Read More: Bill Longstaff: Calling the bluff on "we must compete in the global marketplace"

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Leo Panitch questions the “responsible capitalism” theme which is being used by Ed Miliband in lieu of a more significant alternative to unfettered market dogma: It is most unlikely that Miliband’s call for “responsible capitalism” will refresh genuine political debate let alone galvanise anew a meaningful left-right discourse . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Politics and its Discontents: The ‘Robin-Hood Tax’ Gains Traction

In a declaration that will likely earn him the designation ‘Enemy of the Capitalist State,’ Pope Francis recently called upon the world to redistribute its wealth in order to reduce what is likely the greatest socio-economic scourge of our times, income inequality.

In his address to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and other U.N. leaders, . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: The ‘Robin-Hood Tax’ Gains Traction

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Stephany Griffith-Jones points out the lack of any coherent argument against a Robin Hood tax on financial transactions – and the public support when political parties actually raise it for debate: Major financial sectors such as the United States, Hong Kong and South Korea already have FTTs . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Bill Longstaff: France embraces Robin Hood tax

On August 1st, France introduced its long-promised Financial Transactions Tax (FTT). Popularly referred to as a Robin Hood Tax, or Tobin Tax, the 0.2 per cent levy will apply to sales of publicly traded shares, including credit default swaps, of businesses with a market value of over €1-billion. Ten other European countries, include Germany, Italy . . . → Read More: Bill Longstaff: France embraces Robin Hood tax