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Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, a rare Saturday column on the lessons we should draw from the election of Donald Trump in how we organize and work within our political system.

For further reading (beyond the writing already linked here)…– Others offering similar thoughts include Murray Dobbin, Rick Salutin, Kai Nagata and Robert Reich.– Tabatha Southey highlights how racism . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

The Disaffected Lib: Robert Reich Calls For a What? A "New Democratic Party" Whatever That Is.

During the campaign, Robert Reich urged American progressives to hold their noses and vote for Hillary. He also said that, the day after the election, they should mobilize, perhaps around Bernie Sanders, to create a new progressive movement, one that could challenge both the Republicans and the Democrats in 2020. Well that day has . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Robert Reich Calls For a What? A "New Democratic Party" Whatever That Is.

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Dani Rodrik suggests that instead of engaging in extended hand-wringing over the collapse of public interest in corporate trade deals, we should instead be working on strengthening domestic social contracts: The frustrations of the middle and lower classes today are rooted in the perception that political elites have . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Politics and its Discontents: Why A Tax On Financial Transactions Makes Sense

Robert Reich, for whom I have a great deal of respect, offers this succinct explanation:You can read more about this issue, also often referred to as the Tobin tax, here.Recommend this Post . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: Why A Tax On Financial Transactions Makes Sense

Politics and its Discontents: Why A Tax On Financial Transactions Makes Sense

Robert Reich, for whom I have a great deal of respect, offers this succinct explanation:You can read more about this issue, also often referred to as the Tobin tax, here.Recommend this Post . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: Why A Tax On Financial Transactions Makes Sense

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Andrew Jackson discusses the challenge of ensuring that stable jobs are available in Canada:Good jobs are a central mechanism in the creation of shared prosperity.What matters for workers is not just b… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.- Albert van Senvoort points out that poverty is more difficult to escape in Canada today than it was two decades ago. And Jean Swanson discusses the desperate need for more action from all levels of government… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Robert Reich discusses how our economy is rigged so that the self-proclaimed risk-takers actually can’t lose:I don’t want to pick on Ms. Mayer or the managers of the funds that invest in Yahoo. They… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Robert Reich points out how perpetually more severe corporate rights agreements are destroying the U.S.’ middle class. And Michael Geist concludes his must-read series by summarizing the dangers of the… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- Elaine Power discusses how a basic income can build both individual security and social solidarity:We work for lots of different reasons, not just money. And most of us do work that is never paid. To start, we … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- David Dayen examines the different treatment granted by businesses to well-connected elites compared to everybody else, and says it’s understandable that voters are looking for leaders who understand t… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Politics and its Discontents: Three Dangerous Mythologies

Although directed at an American audience, Robert Reich’s insights are equally applicable to Canada.Recommend this Post . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: Three Dangerous Mythologies

Politics and its Discontents: "It’s A Trojan Horse In A Global Race To The Bottom"

That’s how Former Secretary of Labour Robert Reich, in this brief but very illuminating explanation, describes the Trans Pacific Partnership, approved by the Harper government but not yet ratified. It will be the first real test of how well the new Tru… . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: "It’s A Trojan Horse In A Global Race To The Bottom"

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Danny Dorling discusses the need for kindness among other attributes to bridge growing gaps in wealth and social status:Gross inequality creates a lack of respect for the other group – people who are not like us. … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Robert Reich suggests that government should respond to corporations who engage in anti-social activity such as moving their earnings offshore by making sure they can’t simultaneously take advantage of… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Paul Krugman reviews Robert Reich’s upcoming book, with a particular focus on the connection between corporate power and growing inequality:…Reich makes a very good case that widening inequality larg… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- David Olive talks to Robert Reich about his work fighting inequality:There are certain irrefutable facts besides water always running downhill. There is no arguing, for instance, that the U.S. era Reich describe… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Robert Reich writes about the growing disconnect between the few well-connected people who have warped our political and economic systems for their benefit, and the rest of us who are on the wrong side of that system: (C)orporate executives and Wall Street managers and traders have done . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week.

– Robert Reich writes that the most important source of growing inequality in the U.S. is a political system torqued to further enrich those who already had the most: The underlying problem, then, is not just globalization and technological changes that have made most American workers less competitive. Nor . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Robert Reich argues that the spread of inequality and corporate abuses is the result of deteriorating public morality and the expectation that self-interest will override any social goals: At a time many Republican presidential candidates and state legislators are furiously focusing on private morality – what people . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Robert Reich discusses the unfairness of requiring workers to take all the risk of precarious jobs while sharing few of the rewards: On demand and on call – in the “share” economy, the “gig” economy, or, more prosaically, the “irregular” economy – the result is the same: no predictable earnings . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Howard Elliott writes about the need for senior levels of government to help address the housing needs facing Canadian communities. And the report from Saskatchewan’s advisory group on poverty reduction includes housing among its key priorities as well (while also favouring work on a basic income).

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Robert Reich describes how U.S. voters are rejecting the concept of a ruling class from both the left and the right – while noting that it’s vital to get the answer right as to which alternative is worth pursuing. And Owen Jones sees Jeremy Corbyn’s rise as . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Politics and its Discontents: Robert Reich’s Warning About the Trans Pacific Partnership

Although directed to an American audience, these warnings are equally applicable to Canada:

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The Trans Pacific Partnership is a zombie that refuses to die no matter how many stakes are . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: Robert Reich’s Warning About the Trans Pacific Partnership

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Saturday reading.

– Joseph Heath looks at the spread of the McMansion as an ugly example of competitive consumption which benefits nobody. And Victoria Bateman discusses the need to question the assumptions underlying laissez-faire policymaking: Science and technology are central to rising prosperity, but, as cases such as the internet and . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links