Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Jordy Cummings exposes the shady side of Justin Trudeau’s shin persona. Dimitri Lascaris interviews Nora Loreto about Canada’s relationship with the U.S. And Michal Rozworski challenges Trudeau’s decision to serve as a prop for Donald Trump rather than defending Canadian values: The point to remember is that there would ...

Accidental Deliberations: On non-solutions

Tammy Robert thoroughly documents how Brad Wall’s billion-dollar deficit has nothing to do with either resource revenues (being Wall’s primary excuse for blowing up the budget), or public services (which are his first target for attacks): I can’t consider the way the Saskatchewan government has handled the prospect of streamlining public service – or even this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Martin Kenney comments on Canada’s continuing role in “snow washing” offshore tax evasion. The Conference Board of Canada examines the massive gap between what Canada should receive in public revenues, and what’s actually taken in to keep our society functioning. And Kamal Ahmed highlights how employers are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Bruce Campbell points out how Donald Trump’s blind hatred toward any type of regulation can impose costs in Canada and elsewhere to the extent we’re bound by trade deals which make “harmonization” an expected standard. And Pia Eberhardt recognizes that there’s no point in locking ourselves into the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Scott Sinclair offers his take on what we can expect Donald Trump to pursue in renegotiating NAFTA, and points out that while there are some options which might boost Canadian manufacturing and other sectors, it’s also possible that matters could get far worse for the citizens of all ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Liam Byrne argues that it’s long past time to reevaluate an economic framework which has produced only highly concentrated wealth for a lucky few at everybody else’s expense. And Graeme Wearden reports on Oxfam’s call to rein in both firm-level tax avoidance, and government policy oriented toward eliminating ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Colin Busby and Ramya Muthukumaran offer some suggestions as to how to ensure there’s an adequate social safety net to support people stuck with precarious work: Federal and provincial governments, acting in concert or independently, should reduce the uncertainties of a volatile labour market for newcomers and incumbents. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Jared Bernstein argues that the limited stimulus provided by tax cuts for the rich is far from worth the overall costs of exacerbating inequality and damaging public revenues: I’m encountering progressives who are compelled to be at least somewhat supportive of wasteful, regressive tax cuts, like those proposed ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Christo Aivalis offers some suggestions for a set of progressive and effective tax policies: My view is that the Left has to combine the general philosophy of economic redistribution with the practical needs of getting the money to preserve existing social programs and build new ones. We have ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Wolfgang Munchau writes that the rise of right-wing insurrectionism can be traced largely to “centre-left” parties who have focused most of their attention on imposing austerity and catering to the corporate sector while offering little to citizens, while Naomi Klein comments on the role of neoliberal politics ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Peter Fleming writes that the promise of entrepreneurial self-employment has given way to the nightmare of systematic precarious work: (T)he move to reclassify people as self-employed follows a very simple formula: it helps reduce labour costs and maximise profits for businesses that would rather use contractors than a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Alex Himelfarb discusses why a proportional electoral system can be expected to produce better and more representative public policy: The adversarial approach often means major policy lurches when the government changes. For example, the Harper government undid some important initiatives of the previous government, including the Kelowna Accord, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Bruce Johnstone notes that rather than further attacking public services which have already been under siege throughout his stay in office, Brad Wall and his government should be looking to question Saskatchewan’s inexplicable giveaways to businesses: Well, if Doherty is looking for some “low-hanging fruit” to make our ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – In The Public Interest studies how the privatization of services leads to increased inequality: In the Public Interest’s analysis of recent government contracting identifies five ways in which government privatization disproportionately hurts poor individuals and families… Creation of new user fees: The creation of new user fees to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Henning Meyer interviews Tony Atkinson about the readily-available options to combat inequality – with the first step being to make sure people actually have a voice in the decisions which define how wealth and power are allocated: So, if you dive into the potential solutions you seem to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Bill Moyers writes about the conflict between the wealthy few seeking to preserve their privilege, and the balance of society seeking fairness for everybody: I keep in my files a warning published in [The Economist] a dozen years ago, on the eve of George W. Bush’s second ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Brendan Duke examines the connection between wage growth and worker productivity, and makes the case that the former may lead to the latter: The 1929–1950 increase in wages was at first a result of several policies that directly raised workers’ wages, including the first federal minimum wage, the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Dennis Howlett discusses the public costs of allowing tax avoidance – as Canada could afford a national pharmacare program (and much more) merely by ensuring that the rich pay what they owe: Eliminating tax haven use could save Canada almost $8 billion a year. That’s enough to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Dennis Howlett discusses the public costs of allowing tax avoidance – as Canada could afford a national pharmacare program (and much more) merely by ensuring that the rich pay what they owe: Eliminating tax haven use could save Canada almost $8 billion a year. That’s enough to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Chris Hamby starts off what looks to be a must-read investigation on the effect of ISDS rules by discussing how they’re used to prevent governments from punishing corporate wrongdoing: (A)n 18-month BuzzFeed News investigation, spanning three continents and involving more than 200 interviews and tens of thousands ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Chris Hamby starts off what looks to be a must-read investigation on the effect of ISDS rules by discussing how they’re used to prevent governments from punishing corporate wrongdoing: (A)n 18-month BuzzFeed News investigation, spanning three continents and involving more than 200 interviews and tens of thousands ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Paolo Giuliano and Antonio Spilimbergo study (PDF) how the economic conditions an individual’s youth influence enduring values – and find that the experience of an economic shock tends to lead to a greater appreciation of a fair redistribution of resources: Consistent with theories of social psychology, this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Andrew Jackson makes the case for a review of Canada’s tax system focused on boosting revenue from the wealthy people and corporations who can readily afford it: These tax loopholes are costly. Partial inclusion of capital gains in taxable income costs the federal government alone $3.6 billion ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Alana Semuels examines new research showing a decline in U.S. social mobility within an individual’s working life: Carr and Wiemers used earnings data to measure how fluidly people move up and down the income ladder over the course of their careers. “It is increasingly the case that no ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Dani Rodrik comments on the need for a far more clear set of policy prescriptions for left-wing political parties to present as an alternative to laissez-faire corporate domination, while noting there’s no lack of source material worth considering: The good news is that the intellectual vacuum on ...