Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Anis Chowdhury refutes the theory that top-heavy tax cuts have anything to do with economic development: Cross-country research has found no relationship between changes in top marginal tax rates and growth between 1960 and 2010. For example, during this period, the US cut its top rate by ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Larry Beinhart argues that aside from the gross unfairness and economic harm from growing inequality, there’s a basic problem trusting the uber-rich to make reasonable decisions with massive amounts of wealth. And George Monbiot makes the case that even as he pretends to be an outsider, Donald ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Naomi Klein discusses how Canada’s longstanding – if far from inevitable – identity as a resource economy is standing in the way of both needed action on climate change and reconciliation with First Nations: In Canada, cultivation and industrialization were secondary. First and foremost, this country was ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Sherri Torjman discusses how the the gig economy is based mostly on evading protections for workers – and how the both employment law and social programs need to catch up: Much of the labour market is morphing into freelance or gigs. More and more Canadians are becoming ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Miles Corak reviews Branko Milanovic’s new book on the complicated relationship between globalization and income inequality. Dougald Lamont examines the current state of inequality in Canada. And Matthew Yglesias takes a look at research showing that inequality and social friction can be traced back centuries based on the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Michael Klare writes about the future direction of the oil industry – which looks to involve cashing out quickly than building anything lasting: At the beginning of this century, many energy analysts were convinced that we were at the edge of the arrival of “peak oil”; a peak, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Angella MacEwen discusses how most of what’s sold as “free trade” serves mostly to hand power to the corporate sector at the expense of the public. Ashley Csanady and Monika Warzecha point out that the same is true for Ontario’s business subsidies and tax credits which are normally ...

Accidental Deliberations: On delayed rectification

I’ll largely echo David Climenhaga’s take on Alberta’s oil and gas royalty review (PDF). But it’s well worth highlighting the difference between the two main interpretations of the review’s recommendations – and what they mean for future resource policy. By way of comparison, some of the media spin includes statements along the lines of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Compare and contrast

One option in responding to a precipitous decline in commodity prices which has exposed a province’s overreliance on resource extraction is to work on developing an economy which isn’t so vulnerable to predictable shocks: Ceci said his main focus is to stabilize public services and invest in infrastructure that will help diversify the economy when the ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the Saskatchewan Party’s mid-year fiscal update shows it hasn’t learned a thing about managing a boom-and-bust resource economy – and how it may take Saskatchewan’s electorate to fix the underlying problem. For further reading…– The mid-year update discussed in the column is here (PDF). And the increase in unemployment of more than ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Scott Clark and Peter De Vries discuss the need for a Canadian economic plan which involves investment in the long term rather than politically-oriented payoffs only within a single election cycle. And Joseph Stiglitz points out the obvious need for a global system of investment and financial ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Stephen Marche discusses the Cons’ ongoing efforts to make Canada a more closed and ignorant country: Mr. Harper’s campaign for re-election has so far been utterly consistent with the personality trait that has defined his tenure as prime minister: his peculiar hatred for sharing information. Americans have traditionally ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Robert Reich describes how U.S. voters are rejecting the concept of a ruling class from both the left and the right – while noting that it’s vital to get the answer right as to which alternative is worth pursuing. And Owen Jones sees Jeremy Corbyn’s rise as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Thomas Lemieux and W. Craig Riddell examine Canada’s income distribution and find that one’s place in the 1% is based primarily on rent-seeking rather than merit: (I)n Canada, as in the United States, executives and others working in the financial and business services sectors have been driving ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Lee-Anne Goodman reports on studies from both the Parliamentary Budget Officer (PDF) and the Broadbent Institute (PDF) showing that enlarged tax-free savings accounts stand to blow a massive hole in the federal budget while exacerbating inequality. And PressProgress documents and refutes the pitiful response from the right. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to end your week. – Simon Wren-Lewis nicely describes the austerity con (coming soon in extreme form to an Alberta near you): ‘Mediamacro’ is the term I use to describe macroeconomics as it is portrayed in the majority of the media. Mediamacro has a number of general features. It puts much more emphasis ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Gregory Beatty reports on Saskatchewan’s options now that it can’t count on high oil prices to prop up the provincial budget. And Dennis Howlett writes about the need for a far more progressive tax system both as a matter of fairness, and as a matter of resource management: ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Will Hutton writes about the connection between inequality and the loss of any moral or social purpose in public life: Britain is beset by a crisis of purpose. We don’t know who we are any longer, where we are going or even if there is a “we”. ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the now-infamous story of Eric and Ilsa bears a disturbing resemblance to how Brad Wall has handled Saskatchewan’s finances. For further reading…– Again, the original Eric and Ilsa story is here, with Rob Carrick following up here. And the story was picked up (with appropriate criticism) here, here and here among other ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Amy Goodman discusses Barack Obama’s call to reverse the spread of inequality in the U.S. And Seumas Milne writes that the effort will inevitably challenge the world oligarchs have built up to further their own wealth and power at everybody else’s expense: In most of the world, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Jeff Begley criticizes the Cons and the Quebec Libs for their refusal to even recognize inequality as an issue – which of course results in their only exacerbating the gap between the rich and the rest of us: While Couillard and Harper find the “courage” to attack workers, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Robert Ferdman reports on a Pew Research poll showing that wealthier Americans are downright resentful toward the poor – and think the people with the most difficult lives actually have it too easy: (T)he prevalence of the view might reflect an inability to understand the plight of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Martin O’Neill and Rick Pearce interview Thomas Piketty about possible policy responses to growing inequality: [Martin O’Neill]…(D)o you think that the response to the increase in inequality might be one that explores the sorts of avenues that Meade opened up, and doesn’t just rely on mechanisms of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Mark Gongloff takes a look at social mobility research from multiple countries, and finds that there’s every reason for concern that inheritance is far outweighing individual attributes in determining social status. And Left Futures notes that the problem may only get worse as our corporate overlords become ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Thomas Walkom points out that with oil prices in free fall, we’re now seeing the inevitable consequences of the Cons’ plan to build an economy solely around unstable resource revenues: Sensible countries try to lessen their dependence on volatile commodities. Canada, whose economy has been dominated by resource ...