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Montreal Simon: Scottish Independence and Some Lessons For Alberta

Last Sunday was the second anniversary of Scotland’s independence referendum, which as you may know, was for me a day of great disappointment.

And one I’ll always remember.

But I haven’t dared even mention the anniversary when talking to my family in the Scottish highlands, because for them it’s a day best forgotten.

They don’t want to talk about it. It’s too traumatic.

And they all voted NO.
Read more » . . . → Read More: Montreal Simon: Scottish Independence and Some Lessons For Alberta

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Arthur Neslen points out how new trade agreements figure to make it impossible for governments to meet their environmental commitments. And Corporate Europe Observatory highlights how the CETA will give investors the ability to dictate public policy.

– The Economist discusses the effect of high executive compensation in the U.S., and finds that corporations that shovel exceptionally large amounts of pay to their CEO get sub-par returns for their money.

– Penney Kome writes that the sugar industry’s work to mislead the public about its own health represents just one more example of the dangers of presuming that an undiluted profit motive is anything but antithetical to the public interest.

– On the bright side, Giles Parkinson notes that on a level playing field, solar power has become more affordable than any alternative no matter how dirty.

– Finally, Owen Jones discusses how a strong progressive movement needs to respond to being unfairly dismissed and derided by the corporate media:

A defeatist attitude – and a condescending one, too – says that the media programme people with what to think, reducing the electorate to Murdoch-brainwashed zombies. But a clever approach can neutralise media hostility. Take Sadiq Khan: he was subjected to one of the most vicious political campaigns in postwar Britain, portrayed by the press – including London’s dominant newspaper, the Evening Standard – as the pawn of Islamist fundamentalist extremists. He could have bellowed his frustration every single day, and would have been more than entitled to do so. But he didn’t. He focused on a positive, optimistic message, and not only won the election – he had glowing personal ratings, too.

Momentum, too, presented a masterclass last weekend in dealing with hostile media. Rather than taking aggressive swipes at the media, it framed a response to Dispatches before it was even aired. It projected disappointment rather than fury; it gave a platform to Momentum activists who contrasted sharply with the media portrayal; it was witty; and it showcased what it actually did, using the attack as an opportunity to get its own message across. And there is a lesson there. The left is bitterly accustomed to living with almost farcically hostile media in a country where the press is as much a sophisticated political lobbyist as a means of information. A natural response is to become grouchy, to shake fists angrily, or simply boycott the media altogether. It’s an approach that fires up some of the most dedicated leftwing activists, but it’s a strategic mistake. And both Khan and Momentum show the left can rebut media hostility – and even thrive.

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on how the North Saskatchewan River oil spill may not lead directly to a needed reevaluation of the risks of pipelines – but a public expectation that we’ll shift away from dirty energy may be more significant in the long run.Fo… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- Lana Payne comments on the combination of low wages and nonexistent security attached to jobs for younger workers. And Catherine Baab-Muguira examines the spread of the side hustle economy as a means of bare sur… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Mary O’Hara reviews Daniel Hatcher’s new book on the U.S.’ poverty industry which seeks to exploit public supports for private gain:(A) new book published last week by law professor and advocate Daniel… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- Noah Zon points out that while it’s impossible to avoid rhetoric about eliminating “red tape” for businesses, we’ve seen gratuitous barriers put in place to prevent people from accessing needed public support:It… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.- Phillipe Orliange discusses the significance of inequality in the developing world as a problem for both fairness and economic development:The question of inequality has become so important because societal … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Rafael Gomez and Juan Gomez offer a look at the state of Canadian workplace democracy, as well as some useful proposals to improve it.- The New York Times editorial board points out how the U.S.’ temporary work… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Christopher Jencks discusses why the U.S.’ poor are only getting poorer (in part due to the misapprehension that social programs aren’t available) in reviewing Kathryn Edin and Luke Shaefer’s $2.00 a Day: Livin… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- Nick Dearden discusses how the latest wave of corporate power agreements – including the CETA – stands to undermine democracy in participating countries:Like the US deal, Ceta contains a new legal system, ope… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive: “Top 7 Reasons You Can’t Trust Kinder Morgan”, Pipelines

A new report outlines the “Top 7 Reasons You Can’t Trust Kinder Morgan” and the energy giant’s proposed $5.4 billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project. The post “Top 7 Reasons You Can’t Trust Kinder Morgan”, Pipelines appeare… . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: “Top 7 Reasons You Can’t Trust Kinder Morgan”, Pipelines

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- Robert Frank discusses the essential role of luck in determining the opportunities we have – and how the advantages of a strong social fabric are too often ignored by the people who benefit the most from them… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

daveberta.ca – Alberta Politics: Oil Sands workers call for training in Renewable Energy

A group of oil sands workers are calling on the Alberta government to support the training of 1,000 out of work electricians as solar specialists. With plans to facilitate the registration of those 1,000 training candidates, the Iron & Earth . . . → Read More: daveberta.ca – Alberta Politics: Oil Sands workers call for training in Renewable Energy

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- Paul Krugman writes that we’re far closer to a major energy transformation than many people realize – but that public policy decisions in the next few years may make all the difference in determining whether … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.- Will Wachtmeister reviews Malcolm Torry’s book of arguments for a basic income, focusing in particular on social cohesion and innovation as important reasons why individuals should enjoy economic security. But Se… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive: David Sizuki: Paris Agreement marks a global shift for climate

The Paris Agreement is the “first universal accord to spell out ways to confront climate change”, marks a global shift, argues environmentalist David Suzuki. The agreement requires Canada and other developed countries to ditch fossil fuels and embrace … . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: David Sizuki: Paris Agreement marks a global shift for climate

Carbon49 - Sustainability for Canadian businesses: Green Energy Pioneer Bullfrog Power Talks Energy Landscape

Bullfrog Power is an inspiring Canadian green energy success story. Since 2005 Bullfrog pioneers in providing easy solutions for large businesses like Walmart, Unilever, and RBC as well as individuals to power their homes and offices with 100% renewable energy. At their tenth anniversary I talk to CEO Ron Seftel on how the green energy landscape has evolved and how businesses may position themselves for the anticipated changes from our new climate-friendly federal and provincial governments. . . . → Read More: Carbon49 – Sustainability for Canadian businesses: Green Energy Pioneer Bullfrog Power Talks Energy Landscape

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: UN climate talks offer hope for humanity

As talks continue at the Paris climate conference, David Suzuki sees “signs of hope for an agreement to limit the escalating effects of global warming” and a more constructive role for Canada. The post David Suzuki: UN climate talks offer hope for hum… . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: UN climate talks offer hope for humanity

The Canadian Progressive: COP21: 140 Physicians Demand Bold Canadian Action Against Climate Change

More than 140 Canadian physicians and medical students have signed a letter demanding bold Liberal action on climate change after the COP21 conference. The post COP21: 140 Physicians Demand Bold Canadian Action Against Climate Change appeared first on … . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: COP21: 140 Physicians Demand Bold Canadian Action Against Climate Change

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Paul Edwards discusses the availability of a gradual transition to clean energy while avoiding more than 2 degrees of climate change – but only if we start swapping out fossil fuels for renewable energy now. An… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Robert Reich writes about the growing disconnect between the few well-connected people who have warped our political and economic systems for their benefit, and the rest of us who are on the wrong side of that system: (C)orporate executives and Wall Street managers and traders have done . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Writings of J. Todd Ring: Big oil, pipelines, Trudeau, and energy security for Canada

Why does the Canadian government continue to subsidize the oil industry with billions of dollars a year when the environmental crisis demands the opposite, and when investment in energy efficiency, conservation and green energy create many more jobs? Why does Canada import 40% of the oil we consume when we produce enough to meet all . . . → Read More: Writings of J. Todd Ring: Big oil, pipelines, Trudeau, and energy security for Canada

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– David Cay Johnston observes that the U.S.’ extreme inequality goes far beyond money alone. And Jesse Myerson notes that a basic income can be supported based on principles held across the political spectrum, while making the case as to how it should be developed to serve as . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Matthew Brown and Matt Volz report on the latest oil train derailment in North Dakota. Justin Giovannetti discusses how fracking is leading to regular earthquakes in previously-stable parts of Alberta – which looks doubly dangerous given the presence of pipelines in the affected area. Garret Ellison examines . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Bill Longstaff: Calgary’s CTrain—embracing green

Fortunately, while our federal government remains a persistent laggard on global warming, the provinces and cities are stepping up. Calgary is no exception. In 2012, the city committed to meeting all its electrical needs from renewable sources. One result was the construction of two wind farms totaling 144 megawatts.

The city relies on a variety . . . → Read More: Bill Longstaff: Calgary’s CTrain—embracing green