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PostArctica: Cabane a sucre in Verdun

Becoming a tradition as this is the 5th installment. And after this long cold neverending winter it is great to get out and see tons of people on the street. Cabane a sucre is often translated as “sugar shack” and it is a part of Quebec culture – harvesting maple syrup and basically turning it into a party. It can also be referred to as “sugaring off” but I will leave that to your imagination. Quebec produces about 85% of the world’s maple syrup.

Really good turnout.

The inevitable petting zoo

*Buy me more*

Bit of a clash between rural (Read more…)

. . . → Read More: PostArctica: Cabane a sucre in Verdun

Canadian Dimension: Quebec’s long struggle to build a democratic left party

Photo by abdallahh

Introduction by Richard Fidler

There is probably no one more qualified to describe the 60-year struggle in Quebec to build a democratic and progressive left party than Paul Cliche. As a journalist and union activist, Cliche (who will be 80 years old in May of this year) was at various times a member of the Parti social-démocratique (PSD), the Parti socialiste du Québec (PSQ), the Front d’action politique (FRAP), the Mouvement socialiste (MS), and is currently a prominent member of Québec solidaire (QS). Paul Cliche pic

In the following interview, Paul Cliche presents his analysis of the (Read more…)

Montreal Simon: Stephen Harper’s Totally Disastrous Day of Political Devastation

It seems only appropriate that the only thing Stephen Harper tweeted yesterday, was a little video of himself learning the proper way to pour beer in Ireland.Because I'll bet Great Leader was pouring himself more than a few last night, after what had to be an absolutely disastrous day for him and his ghastly Cons.The day when his campaign of fear and bigotry came back to bite him. And he shot himself in the foot. Read more »

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Don’t Be A Scared Tool

Here’s a song for radicalized Canadians to sing.

I’m white and scared (clap clap) They want my guns (clap clap) And veils are wrong (clap clap) Except on nuns! (clap clap)

“I’m white and scared (clap clap) you know it’s true (clap clap) I’m scared of terror (clap clap) Because I’m a tool (clap clap).”

— Hat tip to Jay Bird

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Following up on last week’s column, Frances Ryan laments the UK Conservatives’ choice to inflict needless suffering on anybody receiving public benefits: During seven weeks of undercover work at a universal credit contact centre in Bolton, Channel 4 journalists witnessed a farcical mess of centralised IT failure. But what really stood out were the underhand tactics DWP staff were found to use against claimants: from deliberately withholding hardship payments from people struggling after having their benefits sanctioned, to hiding the flexible fund put in place to pay for clothes or a (Read more…)

Dead Wild Roses: The DWR Sunday Religious Disservice – The Judge and the Hijab

I’m always impressed with La Belle Province and her ability to serve up controversy. Recently a judge in Quebec decided that a hijab was considered not to be suitable attire for her courtroom and dismissed a case when the litigant refused to comply with her request. The judge’s words courtesy of the CBC:

“Hats and sunglasses for example, are not allowed. And I don’t see why scarves on the head would be either,” Marengo says in the recording.

“The same rules need to be applied to everyone. I will therefore not hear you if you are wearing (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Anonymous Targets Montreal Police For Attacking The Homeless

Online hacktivist collective Anonymous has declared war on the Montreal Police after the force bulldozed a homeless shelter in Viger Square.

The post Anonymous Targets Montreal Police For Attacking The Homeless appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Carbon49 - Sustainability for Canadian businesses: From Ground to Store: We Look at Carbon Neutral Wines

When you see a product that says carbon neutral, what does it mean? I recently enjoyed a bottle of Italy’s number one selling wine in Canada, Santa Margherita’s Pinot Grigio. Each bottle has a green label that says “Carbon neutral from ground to store. Measured and offset with Carbonzero”. It is produced in Italy, imported into Canada by Lifford Wine, and certified by Carbonzero as carbon neutral. I investigate its Italian supply chain and production, shipping to Canada, and sales and consumption in Canada to learn what it means to be carbon neutral.

Carbon neutrality, or having a (Read more…)

Progressive Proselytizing: The NDP’s 7% problem

The NDP’s biggest problem electorally isn’t a question of policy or values or leadership or connecting with voters or just about anything else perennially brought up to explain their difficulties in the polls both federally and provincially across Canada. Their big problem comes down to one stat: only 7% of Canadians think they will win the next federal election, less than a fifth the number the Liberals get. If nobody thinks they can win, there are going to be hordes of theoretical supporters who will vote instead for the person they think might win, typically a Liberal.

Of all the (Read more…)

Bill Longstaff: Energy East—another reason why we need Quebec

Among the arguments that might be made to keep Quebec in Canada is simply that it’s our most progressive province. One can cite ample of evidence for this: it showed the strongest support for the Kyoto Accord and gay marriage, it has the most advanced child care program, it is probably the major reason we said no to the Iraq war … the list goes on.

Earlier this month, the province

Canadian Dimension: Cacouna, Couillard and the Ties that Bind

Photo from Public Domain

It’s an evening like any other. The first item on the Téléjournal is about the controversial Cacouna oil port project. The journalist speaks to citizens in favour of and opposed to the project. Then the spokesperson for TransCanada, the project’s sponsor, appears onscreen. His talking points aren’t particularly noteworthy, but his face is strangely familiar. I’ve seen it before, but where? For hours, the question nagged at me. Later that evening, it came to me in a flash: we had crossed paths during the summer of 2012 in Quebec, during negotiations between the student movement (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Linda McQuaig discusses the radical difference between how Canadians want to see public resources used (based on the example set by governments elsewhere), and the determination of the Cons and their corporate allies to instead fritter away every dime of fiscal capacity the federal government manages to find: Last week, Germany completed its plan to provide free university tuition to all its students. It’s an idea that no doubt would excite the hopes and dreams of young people in Canada — which explains the need to snuff it out before it catches on.

Certainly, (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Big Oil Madness: Gastem’s $1.5 million lawsuit against tiny Quebec village of Ristigouche

Gastem, a Quebec oil and gas exploration company is suing the tiny Quebec village of Ristigouche-Sud-Est to the tune of $1.5-million.

The post Big Oil Madness: Gastem’s $1.5 million lawsuit against tiny Quebec village of Ristigouche appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: On political evolution

Both Chantal Hebert and the combination of Bruce Anderson and David Coletto have written recently about the state of federal politics in Quebec, with particular emphasis on what we can expect as the Bloc Quebecois appears to crumble. With that in mind, I’ll offer a quick reminder as to one of the more subtle factors behind the 2011 Orange Wave – and how things have changed less than we might think at first glance.

As I’ve mentioned before, the NDP’s relatively strong push into Quebec happened to coincide with an election where both the Cons and Libs had obvious (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Robert Green looks at Quebec as a prime example of selective austerity – with tax cuts and other goodies for the wealthy considered sacrosanct, and well-connected insiders being paid substantial sums of public money to tell citizens they’ll have to make do with less: In a move that seems perfectly symbolic of the sort of politics his government represents, Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard announced this week that the five members of the government commission charged with reviewing government programs and recommending where to make cuts will be paid the tidy sum of (Read more…)

The Adventures of Diva Rachel: The Home of the Habs: For Whites Only?

The Hobby Lobby case rules that Corporations can impose their restrictive values on others. What if the corporation is racist?

As a Verdun resident, Fred Christie follows the Habs, as do a legion of other Quebeckers. The Montrealer is even a proud season-ticket holder.

Accompanied by two friends, Mr. Christie enters the tavern at the Canadiens‘ hockey area, plunks down some cash and orders a few beers. The bartender refuses to serve him. The assistant manager then explains to his would-be customers that the establishment extends no courtesy to Negroes.

It is 1936. July 11th 1936.

The protagonist (Read more…)

THE CANADIAN PROGRESSIVE: Climate Activists Mourn Victims of Lac-Mégantic Tragedy

On the one-year anniversary of the Lac-Mégantic tragedy, climate activists say the Canadian government has treated the fatal train derailment “primarily as a public relations problem rather than a public safety problem.”

The post Climate Activists Mourn Victims of Lac-Mégantic Tragedy appeared first on THE CANADIAN PROGRESSIVE.

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Reflections On Canada Day: The Impact Of Canadian History

I’m writing this on the morning of Canada Day 2014, thinking about all the fascinating things I’ve read about and seen, and all the people I’ve met. One thing I’ve come across is all the different parts of Canadian history I’ve studied, and how they’ve tied into many of the recent issues we’ve faced in Canada.

Take, for instance, the recent Quebec election and the idea of separatism popping up yet again; Aboriginal people disputing developments in places like northern B.C. and Caledonia; Alberta’s development of its energy resources and the disputes it’s had with other parties over the (Read more…)

The Scott Ross: Our First Canada Day

Our country was going to be called “Kingdom of Canada” instead of Dominion, but the British, fearing it would provoke the Americans, unilaterally changed it.

The greatest thing we can do to celebrate our country is to know more about it. And certainly learning about Canada and celebrating it need not be separate; below are a few quotes made on our first Canada Day July 1st 1867:

“Died! Last night at twelve o’clock, the free and enlightened Province of Nova Scotia.”- The Halifax Morning Chronicle, a newspaper that thought confederation would hurt Nova Scotia.

“With the first dawn of (Read more…)

Bill Longstaff: Dying with dignity in Quebec

Quebec’s new Liberal government has decided to reintroduce Bill 52, the end-of-life care bill first tabled by the PQ in June 2013. The legislation will allow terminally ill patients to request medical assistance in dying if they suffer from an incurable illness that is in an advanced state and which inflicts intolerable physical and psychological pain. The bill has been welcomed by the province’s

PostArctica: Construction On Gordon Avenue, Verdun

After being a vacant lot for 6 or 7 years condos are finally being built at the old CKVL location and also at the former parking lot across the street. Inevitable, perhaps, but two of the biggest obstacles in preserving worthy heritage properties, and CKVL was an Art Deco building of some significance in Verdun, is local property owners who fear that their taxes may go up if the city does not build more condos and that their own property values may rise when new private housing is built, double edged, but it does explain in part why their is (Read more…)

PostArctica: Construction On Gordon Avenue, Verdun

After being a vacant lot for 6 or 7 years condos are finally being built at the old CKVL location and also at the former parking lot across the street. Inevitable, perhaps, but two of the biggest obstacles in preserving worthy heritage properties, and CKVL was an Art Deco building of some significance in Verdun, is local property owners who fear that their taxes may go up if the city does not build more condos and that their own property values may rise when new private housing is built, double edged, but it does explain in part why their is (Read more…)

PostArctica: Community

My generation from Verdun grew up With Fathers who worked in factories and Mothers who, if they worked were in retail or service low paying respectable jobs.

To do better was a challenge in many, many ways these were awesome people of incredibly principled standards but fun loving people they were, too appreciated a joke and understood sadness.

We had a community 90,000 people and it always seemed like you knew everybody there was two religions Catholic and Protestant and two languages English and French We didn’t always all get along But when things got tough you could depend on (Read more…)

PostArctica: Community

My generation from Verdun grew up With Fathers who worked in factories and Mothers who, if they worked were in retail or service low paying respectable jobs.

To do better was a challenge in many, many ways these were awesome people of incredibly principled standards but fun loving people they were, too appreciated a joke and understood sadness.

We had a community 90,000 people and it always seemed like you knew everybody there was two religions Catholic and Protestant and two languages English and French We didn’t always all get along But when things got tough you could depend on (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Edward Greenspon’s report on the Keystone XL review process is well worth a read – particularly in exposing how the Harper Cons have handled their U.S. relations (along with many other policy areas) based on the presumption that nobody will ever see fit to consider the environmental costs of maximizing oil exploitation. And on that front, Andrew Leach highlights how Ottawa and Edmonton alike have assumed they can get away with paying lip service to climate change – even as the Obama administration has rightly recognized it as a top priority.

- (Read more…)