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The Adventures of Diva Rachel: The Home of the Habs: For Whites Only?

The Hobby Lobby case rules that Corporations can impose their restrictive values on others. What if the corporation is racist?

As a Verdun resident, Fred Christie follows the Habs, as do a legion of other Quebeckers. The Montrealer is even a proud season-ticket holder.

Accompanied by two friends, Mr. Christie enters the tavern at the Canadiens‘ hockey area, plunks down some cash and orders a few beers. The bartender refuses to serve him. The assistant manager then explains to his would-be customers that the establishment extends no courtesy to Negroes.

It is 1936. July 11th 1936.

The protagonist (Read more…)

THE CANADIAN PROGRESSIVE: Climate Activists Mourn Victims of Lac-Mégantic Tragedy

On the one-year anniversary of the Lac-Mégantic tragedy, climate activists say the Canadian government has treated the fatal train derailment “primarily as a public relations problem rather than a public safety problem.”

The post Climate Activists Mourn Victims of Lac-Mégantic Tragedy appeared first on THE CANADIAN PROGRESSIVE.

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Reflections On Canada Day: The Impact Of Canadian History

I’m writing this on the morning of Canada Day 2014, thinking about all the fascinating things I’ve read about and seen, and all the people I’ve met. One thing I’ve come across is all the different parts of Canadian history I’ve studied, and how they’ve tied into many of the recent issues we’ve faced in Canada.

Take, for instance, the recent Quebec election and the idea of separatism popping up yet again; Aboriginal people disputing developments in places like northern B.C. and Caledonia; Alberta’s development of its energy resources and the disputes it’s had with other parties over the (Read more…)

The Scott Ross: Our First Canada Day

Our country was going to be called “Kingdom of Canada” instead of Dominion, but the British, fearing it would provoke the Americans, unilaterally changed it.

The greatest thing we can do to celebrate our country is to know more about it. And certainly learning about Canada and celebrating it need not be separate; below are a few quotes made on our first Canada Day July 1st 1867:

“Died! Last night at twelve o’clock, the free and enlightened Province of Nova Scotia.”- The Halifax Morning Chronicle, a newspaper that thought confederation would hurt Nova Scotia.

“With the first dawn of (Read more…)

Bill Longstaff: Dying with dignity in Quebec

Quebec’s new Liberal government has decided to reintroduce Bill 52, the end-of-life care bill first tabled by the PQ in June 2013. The legislation will allow terminally ill patients to request medical assistance in dying if they suffer from an incurable illness that is in an advanced state and which inflicts intolerable physical and psychological pain. The bill has been welcomed by the province’s

PostArctica: Construction On Gordon Avenue, Verdun

After being a vacant lot for 6 or 7 years condos are finally being built at the old CKVL location and also at the former parking lot across the street. Inevitable, perhaps, but two of the biggest obstacles in preserving worthy heritage properties, and CKVL was an Art Deco building of some significance in Verdun, is local property owners who fear that their taxes may go up if the city does not build more condos and that their own property values may rise when new private housing is built, double edged, but it does explain in part why their is (Read more…)

PostArctica: Construction On Gordon Avenue, Verdun

After being a vacant lot for 6 or 7 years condos are finally being built at the old CKVL location and also at the former parking lot across the street. Inevitable, perhaps, but two of the biggest obstacles in preserving worthy heritage properties, and CKVL was an Art Deco building of some significance in Verdun, is local property owners who fear that their taxes may go up if the city does not build more condos and that their own property values may rise when new private housing is built, double edged, but it does explain in part why their is (Read more…)

PostArctica: Community

My generation from Verdun grew up With Fathers who worked in factories and Mothers who, if they worked were in retail or service low paying respectable jobs.

To do better was a challenge in many, many ways these were awesome people of incredibly principled standards but fun loving people they were, too appreciated a joke and understood sadness.

We had a community 90,000 people and it always seemed like you knew everybody there was two religions Catholic and Protestant and two languages English and French We didn’t always all get along But when things got tough you could depend on (Read more…)

PostArctica: Community

My generation from Verdun grew up With Fathers who worked in factories and Mothers who, if they worked were in retail or service low paying respectable jobs.

To do better was a challenge in many, many ways these were awesome people of incredibly principled standards but fun loving people they were, too appreciated a joke and understood sadness.

We had a community 90,000 people and it always seemed like you knew everybody there was two religions Catholic and Protestant and two languages English and French We didn’t always all get along But when things got tough you could depend on (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Edward Greenspon’s report on the Keystone XL review process is well worth a read – particularly in exposing how the Harper Cons have handled their U.S. relations (along with many other policy areas) based on the presumption that nobody will ever see fit to consider the environmental costs of maximizing oil exploitation. And on that front, Andrew Leach highlights how Ottawa and Edmonton alike have assumed they can get away with paying lip service to climate change – even as the Obama administration has rightly recognized it as a top priority.

- (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: New study reveals best and worst cities to be a woman in Canada

by: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives | Press Release | April 23, 2014

OTTAWA—A new study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) reveals the best and worst cities to be a woman in Canada. According to the study, Québec City is the best city to be a woman and Edmonton is the worst.

The study, by Kate McInturff, a Senior Researcher at the CCPA, ranks Canada’s 20 largest metropolitan areas based on a comparison of how men and women are faring in five areas: economic security, leadership, health, personal security, and education.

“Canada has made great (Read more…)

Sketchy Thoughts: Islamophobic Attacks in Montreal: The Need for a Militant Movement Against Racism

On April 8, two Islamophobic attacks were carried out in Montreal. In the first case, in the early morning hours, an axe was thrown through a window the Centre communautaire islamique Assahaba with the words “Fuck Liberals” and “we will exterminate Muslims” written on it. Then, later that day, someone rode up on their bicycle, took out a baseball bat, and smashed the windows of three cars in front of the Madani mosque as their owners were inside saying their evening prayers.

The April 8 attacks came the day after the right-wing Liberal Party had defeated the equally right-wing incumbent (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Timothy Shenk discusses Thomas Piketty’s contribution to a critique of unfettered capitalism and gratuitous inequality: Seen from Piketty’s vantage point, thousands of feet above the rubble, the fragility of this moment becomes clear. Economic growth was a recent invention, major reductions to income inequality more recent still. Yet the aftermath of World War II was filled with prophets forecasting this union into eternity. Kuznets offered the most sophisticated expression of this cheerful projection. Extrapolating from the history of the United States between 1913 and 1948, he concluded that economic growth automatically reduced (Read more…)

PostArctica: Zappy Pizza

April 10, 2014 7:45am

PostArctica: Zappy Pizza

April 10, 2014 7:45am

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- David Dayen discusses how prepaid debit cards are turning into the latest means for the financial sector to extract artificial fees from consumers. And Matt Taibbi reports on the looting of public pension funds in the U.S.: Nor did anyone know that part of Raimondo’s strategy for saving money involved handing more than $1 billion – 14 percent of the state fund – to hedge funds, including a trio of well-known New York-based funds: Dan Loeb’s Third Point Capital was given $66 million, Ken Garschina’s Mason Capital got $64 million and (Read more…)

The Scott Ross: Quebec Election Shows Hypocrisy On Clarity Act

Stephen Harper, Justin Trudeau, and Andrew Coyne, among others, are wrong to suggest separatism was recently defeated by Quebec voters. Well they aren’t just wrong, they’re hypocritical.

Since the close defeat of separatism in the 1995 referendum, federalists have demanded a clear question for any public decision on Quebec sovereignty. Parliament even passed the Clarity Act, enshrining such a requirement into law.

Considering the need therefore of a clear question to decide whether Quebeckers want to stay in Canada or not, it is mind-blowing to see our country’s politicians and pundits claim that the Parti Quebecois’s (Read more…)

Bill Longstaff: Quebec—another majority that isn’t

A lot of euphoria last night from Liberal supporters and those many Canadians (including not a few Quebecers) who don’t want to hear about separation for another generation at least. Not only did the Liberals win, they won big, majority big.

Or at least the majority that counts which, unfortunately, is not a majority of Quebecers. A solid majority (58 per cent) did not vote Liberal.

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Livio Di Matteo discusses the wasted opportunity to improve Canada’s health care system through concerted national investments. And Ryan Meili asks who will provide future direction now that the Cons have scrapped the Health Council of Canada: Now we see the federal government making a bad situation worse by walking away from the process of rebuilding a national health system entirely instead of negotiating a more robust agreement with targets and timelines for innovation and cost-savings.

The elimination of the Health Council only further underlines this movement away from national planning for (Read more…)

The Scott Ross: From Five Female Premiers To Just Two

The Parti Quebecois loss tonight shows just how hard it is for women politicians to actually have a chance in government. Pauline Marois will be the 3rd female Premier gone this year, leaving only two; Christy Clark in BC and Kathleen Wynn in Ontario.Why Marois’s loss tonight is bad for women is not because of her exit but because of her entrance. And that is she was doomed from the start.Successful political parties have a habit in Canada of not selecting women leaders, in fact it’s only when those parties are in desperation do they resort (Read more…)

. . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: From Five Female Premiers To Just Two

Trashy's World: Is Quebec sovereignty dead?

Maybe not entirely dead, but quite possibly in its death throes. Good work, PLQ! Et, pour les Péquistes – il faut savoir quand vous devriez quitter la soireé.. (2) Trashy, Ottawa, Ontario

The Liberal Scarf: Mapping out past Quebec election results – vote splits and vote efficiency make the different in Quebec provincial elections

In preparation for the Quebec provincial election on Monday, I mapped out some past Quebec election results, comparing the vote and seat share received by each party. Click the graph to embiggen, the vote share is on the left, seat share on the right.

In Quebec elections, the Parti Quebecois is often said to have a built in advantage, in that they have a more “efficient” vote. The Liberals win super-majorities in Montreal, while the PQ is able to squeak out more victories by a smaller margin in the regions by winning francophone voters, meaning that in theory, the PLQ (Read more…)

The Scott Ross: Vote PQ To End Separatism

All federalists should want the Parti Quebecois to win Quebec’s election this Monday. Why? Because support for separation is so low that holding a referendum would end the issue for a generation, if not for good.

If the PQ loses however, which is looking likely, separatism will continue to simmer until the PQ forms government again, and who knows how popular the issue will be by then.

In voting against the PQ Quebeckers are exchanging a safe referendum outcome today for an uncertain one tomorrow.

Federalists may think they are making Canada stronger with a Quebec Liberal election victory next (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

- Paul Krugman compares the U.S.’ longtime recognition that concentrated wealth can do massive social harm to the Republicans’ recent efforts to claim that raising any revenue from the rich is somehow un-American: The truth is that, in the early 20th century, many leading Americans warned about the dangers of extreme wealth concentration, and urged that tax policy be used to limit the growth of great fortunes. Here’s another example: In 1919, the great economist Irving Fisher — whose theory of “debt deflation,” by the way, is essential in understanding our current (Read more…)

The Adventures of Diva Rachel: Ottawa’s RedBlacks, Redskins and Blackface

The National Capital Region will soon welcome a new CFL football club. This will be the third time the team rises from its ashes: the Ottawa Rough Riders went bankrupt in 1996, and again in 2006 under the Renegades moniker. At the time, Franco-Ontarian football fans (and those in nearby Gatineau, QC) expected a club in financial trouble would make efforts to reach as many supporters as possible, including 250,000 Francophones in the region. Fat chance. The Renegades even failed include French on their official website.

It was handled to poorly that the English media is begging the new football (Read more…)