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eaves.ca: Government, Digital Services & IT Procurement Reform

Next semester I’ll be teaching a course on why healthcare.gov initially turned into a disaster. Why? Because sadly, the failure of healthcare.gov was not special. Conservative estimates suggest over half of all IT projects are not completed on time or on budget. Others suggest the numbers are higher still. What did make healthcare.gov special was . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Government, Digital Services & IT Procurement Reform

eaves.ca: The Future of USDS: Trump, civic tech and the lesson of GDS

Across Washington, the country, and the world, the assumptions people have about various programs, policies and roles have been radically altered in the last 12 hours with the victory of President-Elect Trump. Many of my students and colleagues have asked me — what does this mean for the future of United States Digital Service and . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: The Future of USDS: Trump, civic tech and the lesson of GDS

eaves.ca: The Empire Strikes Back: How the death of GDS puts all government innovators at risk

The UK Government Digital Service(GDS) is dead. I’m sure it will continue to exist in some form, but from what I’ve read it appears to have been gutted of its culture, power and mandate. As a innovator and force for pulling the UK government into t… . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: The Empire Strikes Back: How the death of GDS puts all government innovators at risk

eaves.ca: Canada’s Draft Open Government Plan — The Promise and Problems Reviewed

Backdrop On Friday the Canadian Government released its draft national action plan. Although not mentioned overtly in the document, these plans are mandated by the Open Government Partnership (OGP), in which member countries must draft National Action … . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Canada’s Draft Open Government Plan — The Promise and Problems Reviewed

eaves.ca: On Journalism, Government and the cost of Digital Illiteracy

Earlier today the CBC published a piece by Alison Crawford about Canadian public servants editing wikipedia. It draws from a clever twitter bot — @gccaedits— that tracks edits to wikipedia from government IP address. I love the twitter account . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: On Journalism, Government and the cost of Digital Illiteracy

eaves.ca: Moving to Harvard

Hi friends. Just a brief note to say that I’ve been invited to come to the Kennedy School of Government to be a Research Fellow in the Science, Technology and Public Policy Program (STPP) at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. I’ve also been . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Moving to Harvard

eaves.ca: The Value of Open Data – Don’t Measure Growth, Measure Destruction

Alexander Howard – who, in my mind, is the best guy covering the Gov 2.0 space – pinged me the other night to ask “What’s the best evidence of open data leading to economic outcomes that you’ve seen?”

I’d like to hack the question because – I suspect – for many people, they will be . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: The Value of Open Data – Don’t Measure Growth, Measure Destruction

eaves.ca: Canada Post and the War on Open Data, Innovation & Common Sense (continued, sadly)

Almost exactly a year ago I wrote a blog post on Canada Post’s War on the 21st Century, Innovation & Productivity. In it I highlighted how Canada Post launched a lawsuit against a company – Geocoder.ca – that recreates the postal code database via crowdsourcing. Canada Posts case was never strong, but then, that was . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Canada Post and the War on Open Data, Innovation & Common Sense (continued, sadly)

eaves.ca: CivicOpen: New Name, Old Idea

The other day Zac Townsend published a piece, “Introducing the idea of an open-source suite for municipal governments,” laying out the case for why cities should collaboratively create open source software that can be shared among them.

I think it is a great idea. And I’m thrilled to hear that more people are excited about . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: CivicOpen: New Name, Old Idea

eaves.ca: The South -> North Innovation Path in Government: An Example?

I’ve always felt that a lot of innovation happens where resources are scarcest. Scarcity forces us to think differently, to be efficient and to question traditional (more expensive) models.

This is why I’m always interested to see how local governments in developing economies are handling various problems. There is always an (enormous) risk that these . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: The South -> North Innovation Path in Government: An Example?

eaves.ca: Proactive Disclosure – An Example of Doing it Wrong from Service Canada

Just got flagged about this precious example of doing proactive disclosure wrong. So here is a Shared Service Canada website dedicated the Roundtable on Information Technology Infrastructure. Obviously this is a topic of real interest to me – I write a fair bit about delivering (or failing to deliver) government service online effectively. I think it […] . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Proactive Disclosure – An Example of Doing it Wrong from Service Canada

eaves.ca: The UK’s Digital Government Strategy – Worth a Peek

I’ve got a piece up on TechPresident about the UK Government’s Digital Strategy which was released today. The strategy (and my piece!) are worth checking out. They are saying a lot of the right things – useful stuff for anyone in industry or sector that has been conservative vis-a-vis online services (I’m looking at you governments […] . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: The UK’s Digital Government Strategy – Worth a Peek

eaves.ca: Playing with Budget Cutbacks: On a Government 2.0 Response, Wikileaks & Analog Denial of Service Attacks

Reflecting on yesterday’s case study in broken government I had a couple of addition thoughts that I thought fun to explore and that simply did not make sense including in the original post.

A Government 2.0 Response

Yesterday’s piece was all about how Treasury Board’s new rules were likely to increase the velocity of paperwork . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Playing with Budget Cutbacks: On a Government 2.0 Response, Wikileaks & Analog Denial of Service Attacks

eaves.ca: Open Postal Codes: A Public Response to Canada Post on how they undermine the public good

Earlier this week the Ottawa Citizen ran a story in which I’m quoted about a fight between Treasury Board and Canada Post officials over making postal code data open. Treasury Board officials would love to add it to data.gc.ca while Canada post officials are, to put it mildly, deeply opposed.

This is of course, unsurprising . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Open Postal Codes: A Public Response to Canada Post on how they undermine the public good

eaves.ca: The US Government’s Digital Strategy: The New Benchmark and Some Lessons

Last week the White House launched its new roadmap for digital government. This included the publication of Digital Government: Building a 21st Century Platform to Better Serve the American People (PDF version), the issuing of a Presidential directive and the announcement of White House Innovation Fellows.

In other words, it was a big week for . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: The US Government’s Digital Strategy: The New Benchmark and Some Lessons

eaves.ca: The I Lost My Wallet – Doing Government Service Delivery Right

A couple of years ago I was in Portugal to give a talk on Gov 2.0 at a conference the government was organizing. After the talk I went for dinner with the country’s CIO and remember hearing about a fantastic program they were running that – for me – epitomized the notion of a citizen . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: The I Lost My Wallet – Doing Government Service Delivery Right

eaves.ca: Mainstreaming The Gov 2.0 Message in the Canadian Public Service

A couple of years ago I wrote a Globe Op-Ed “A Click Heard Across the Public Service” that outlined the significance of the clerk using GCPEDIA to communicate with public servants. It was a message – or even more importantly – an action to affirm his commitment to change how government works.

Well, the clerk . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Mainstreaming The Gov 2.0 Message in the Canadian Public Service

eaves.ca: Open Data Movement is a Joke?

Yesterday, Tom Slee wrote a blog post called “Why the ‘Open Data Movement’ is a Joke,” which – and I say this as a Canadian who understands the context in which Slee is writing – is filled with valid complaints about our government, but which I feel paints a flawed picture of the open data . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Open Data Movement is a Joke?

eaves.ca: Public Policy: The Big Opportunity For Health Record Data

A few weeks ago Colin Hansen – a politician in the governing party in British Columbia (BC) – penned an op-ed in the Vancouver Sun entitled Unlocking our data to save lives. It’s a paper both the current government and opposition should read, as it is filled with some very promising ideas.

In it, he . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Public Policy: The Big Opportunity For Health Record Data

eaves.ca: Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government: A Review

The other day the Canadian Government published its Action Plan on Open Government, a high level document that both lays out the Government’s goals on this file as well as fulfill its pledge to create tangible goals as part of its participation in next week’s Open Government Partnership 2012 annual meeting in Brazil.

So what . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government: A Review

eaves.ca: Using BHAG’s to Change Organziations: A Management, Open Data & Government Mashup

I’m a big believer in the ancillary benefits of a single big goal. Set a goal that has one clear objective, but as a result a bunch of other things have to change as well.

So one of my favourite Big Hairy Audacious Goals (BHAG) for an organization is to go paperless. I like the . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Using BHAG’s to Change Organziations: A Management, Open Data & Government Mashup

eaves.ca: Citizen Surveillance and the Coming Challenge for Public Institutions

The other day I stumbled over this intriguing article which describes how a group of residents in Vancouver have started to surveille the police as they do their work in the downtown eastside, one of the poorest and toughest neighborhoods in Canada. The reason is simple. Many people – particularly those who are marginalized and . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Citizen Surveillance and the Coming Challenge for Public Institutions

eaves.ca: Want to Find Government Innovation? US Military is often leading the way.

When it comes to see what trends will impact government in 20-30 years I’m a big fan of watching the US military. They may do lot of things wrong but, when it comes to government, they are on the bleeding edge of being a “learning organization.” It often feels like they are less risk averse, . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Want to Find Government Innovation? US Military is often leading the way.

eaves.ca: Access to Information, Open Data and the Problem with Convergence

In response to my post yesterday one reader sent me a very thoughtful commentary that included this line at the end:

“Rather than compare [Freedom of Information] FOI legislation and Open Gov Data as if it’s “one or the other”, do you think there’s a way of talking about how the two might converge?”

One . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Access to Information, Open Data and the Problem with Convergence

eaves.ca: Calculating the Value of Canada’s Open Data Portal: A Mini-Case Study

Okay, let’s geek out on some open data portal stats from data.gc.ca. I’ve got three parts to this review: First, an assessment on how to assess the value of data.gc.ca. Second, a look at what are the most downloaded data sets. And third, some interesting data about who is visiting the portal.

Before we dive . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Calculating the Value of Canada’s Open Data Portal: A Mini-Case Study