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Alberta Politics: RCMP turn a blind eye to abandoned firearms in Fort Mac – manna to the gun lobby but a worry to the rest of us

PHOTO: RCMP officers like these in High River during the flooding to 2013 were subjected to a vicious campaign of vilification by some Alberta gun enthusiasts for seizing abandoned weapons in the Southern Alberta town (CBC photo). QUEBEC CITY We know f… . . . → Read More: Alberta Politics: RCMP turn a blind eye to abandoned firearms in Fort Mac – manna to the gun lobby but a worry to the rest of us

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- Hugh MacKenzie reminds us how quickly Canada’s richest CEOs will exceed the income of the average Canadian worker on the year’s first work day. And James Surowiecki takes a look at how the U.S.’ corporate sec… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Paul Krugman reviews Robert Reich’s upcoming book, with a particular focus on the connection between corporate power and growing inequality:…Reich makes a very good case that widening inequality larg… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.- Louis-Philippe Rochon explains how higher taxes on the wealthy can be no less a boon for the economy than for the goal of social equality:In fact, empirical analysis shows that while the relationship between hig… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Crossing Topsail Road #nlpoli

A new high school has put the better part of a thousand young people on Topsail Road opposite a raft of fast food outlets and a major mall.

Young people will cross Topsail Road, a four–lane major thoroughfare in St. John’s.  it is dangerous.  Things will get more dangerous.  City council is thinking about building . . . → Read More: The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Crossing Topsail Road #nlpoli

Accidental Deliberations: On know-nothings

Shorter Lisa Raitt: Now that I think about it, somebody should probably be responsible for regulating vehicle safety. (aide whispers in ear) Wait, that’s me? Why is this the first I’ve heard of it?

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Brendan O’Neill writes that the UK Cons are following in Stephen Harper’s footsteps by pushing the concept of thought policing. And George Monbiot rightly criticizes the gross inflation of supposed terror threats and simultaneous neglect of far more serious risks: A global survey published last week by . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Adrian Morrow reports on Al Gore’s explanation as to how the fight against climate change can be economically as well as environmentally beneficial, while CTV points out a new Nanos poll showing that Canadians largely agree with the view that cleaner technology can and should replace dirty . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– The Broadbent Institute details Rhys Kesselman’s research on how the Cons’ expanded TFSAs are nothing but a giveaway to the wealthy. And Dean Beeby reports on their withholding of EI supplements from the families who most need them – paired with a complete lack of responsibility or . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On delay tactics

Following up on this post, let’s look in a bit more detail as to how the Cons might try to make excuses for a delay in this fall’s expected federal election – and why they might be happy to use the more questionable means to do so.

As noted in the previous post, the fixed . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On delay tactics

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Emmanuel Saez examines the U.S.’ latest income inequality numbers and finds that the gap between the wealthy few and everybody else is still growing. The Equality Trust finds that the UK’s tax system is already conspicuously regressive even as the Cameron Cons plan to make it more so. . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Jeff Spross argues that in addition to ensuring that employees are fairly paid for the overtime hours they work, we should also be pushing to ensure people aren’t required to work as much to begin with. And Angella MacEwen points out that any spin about increasing wages . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Genevieve LeBaron, Johanna Montgomerie, and Daniela Tepe-Belfrage write that inequality is getting worse in the UK based on class, gender and all kinds of other grounds, while a supposed “recovery” isn’t benefiting anybody except the people who least need it: (E)conomic policies associated with ‘recovery’ in the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– LOLGOP discusses the important role unions play in ensuring widespread freedom and prosperity – and why they’re thus target number one for corporatists seeking to hoard more wealth at the top: When Scott Walker promises to bring his anti-union policies that have help lead Wisconsin to the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Lynne Fernandez properly labels the Cons’ federal budget as the “inequality budget”. Andrew Jackson discusses how we’ve ended up in a new Gilded Age in Canada, and what we can do to extricate ourselves from it. And BC BookLook reviews Andrew MacLeod’s new book on inequality by pointing . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, condensing this post on the component parts of the Cons’ terror bill.

For further reading…– Michael Geist writes that C-51 represents the evisceration of privacy in Canada. – Jim Bronskill reports on Amnesty International’s opposition to C-51 as a means of targeting activists. And Alyssa Stryker and Carmen Cheung highlight six elements protesters will . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Alan Rusbridger explains the Guardian’s much-appreciated effort to provide both space and analysis of the need to fight climate change. And Naomi Klein makes the case for a Marshall plan-style response to transition the world to a sustainable society, while highlighting the need for a public push to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On dumbed-down messages

Shorter Tom Lukiwski: When it comes to terror laws, we Conservatives have no time for “legal jargon” like rights, life, liberty or justice. In fact, we’d like you to focus solely on one word.

Accidental Deliberations: On constitutional questions

Most of the analysis surrounding the Cons’ terror bill so far has assumed that CSIS’ powers will be interpreted based on a plain reading of the legislation. Under this reading of C-51, any action which could violate the Charter or other Canadian law would only be authorized by a warrant, meaning that deprivations of rights . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On constitutional questions

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Sara Mojtehedzadeh reports on the work done by the Broadbent Institute and Mariana Mazzucato to highlight the importance of publicly-funded innovation: According to a 2014 report by the International Monetary Fund, Canadian companies have been accumulating “dead money” at a faster rate than any other G7 country, rather . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On proper fixes

Since this headline seems to be getting far more attention than the actual accompanying interview (if mostly from people with a strong vested interest in distorting the NDP’s position), let’s take a moment to discuss what we’d expect a responsible party to do upon taking power – and what we can tell from a party’s . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On proper fixes

Accidental Deliberations: On motivating factors

Andrew Coyne offers what’s probably the most reasonable argument to treat the negligible threat of terrorism differently from the other risks we so readily accept (and indeed which are regularly exacerbated by deregulation).

But Coyne’s argument falls well short of justifying the response actually on offer from the Cons – and indeed looks questionable on . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On motivating factors

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Tessa Jowell writes that we need to treat inequality as a disease which can be cured through effective public policy, but the Star points out that the Cons have instead gone out of their way to make it worse. Fair Vote Canada interviews J. Peter Venton about . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Elias Isquith interviews Mark Blyth about his book on the disastrous consequences of austerity, while Paul Krugman writes that austerity is particularly sure to cause economic destruction when combined with a push toward consumer deleveraging. And Bruce Campbell looks to Syriza as an example of how people . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Paul Mason discusses the effect a guaranteed annual income could have on individuals’ choices about labour and employment: A true, subsistence level basic income would close to double [existing social spending in the UK]. But it is imaginable, in the short to medium term, if you factor in . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links