The Sir Robert Bond Papers: We won’t walk to a nearby walking trail #nlpoli

The Town of Happy Valley-Goose Bay commissioned a consultant to look at possible future development of a sand pit in a residential area of the town. You can read the report at the town website. The consultants first held a public meeting open to all town residents.  Then they tried other ways of soliciting opinions, ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: We won’t walk to a nearby walking trail #nlpoli

The Town of Happy Valley-Goose Bay commissioned a consultant to look at possible future development of a sand pit in a residential area of the town. You can read the report at the town website. The consultants first held a public meeting open to all town residents.  Then they tried other ways of soliciting opinions, ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on how the North Saskatchewan River oil spill may not lead directly to a needed reevaluation of the risks of pipelines – but a public expectation that we’ll shift away from dirty energy may be more significant in the long run. For further reading…– I’ve previously posted about Brad Wall’s response to ...

Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Glenn Greenwald interviews Alex Cuadros about his new book on how Brazil has been warped politically and economically by the whims of its billionaire class. And PressProgress takes a look at the impact of economic inequality on Canada’s cities. – Sharon Wright examines how draconian restrictions on social ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – John Milloy discusses the difference between trade and corporate control – while noting that recent “trade agreements” have tended to favour the latter without being the subject of meaningful public debate: For far too long, elites have characterized trade discussions as too complicated for the general public to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jeff Guo reports on Peter Lindert and Jeffrey Williamson’s research showing how the U.S. went from standing out internationally for its relatively equal distribution of wealth, to being equally exceptional in its inequality: In the Revolutionary era, inequality in America was dramatically lower than it was in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Martin Lukacs highlights the Canadian public’s broad support for the Leap Manifesto – and the opportunity available to any party willing to put its contents into practice. And Shawn Katz is hopeful that the NDP will seize the opening. But Bill Tieleman points out that the best intentions ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: MQO poll shows big Liberal slide #nlpoli

Just for the fun of comparison, here’s the CRA polling results for a year covering the last time the provincial government saw a change of party and the new crowd introduced a killer budget no one expected. The Conservatives dropped from 55 points in November 2003 to 33 points in May of the next year. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Sean McElwee examines how the wealthy control the U.S.’ political system, while public opinion plays far too little role in policy choices: A comprehensive study by Grossmann finds that public opinion was a significant factor in 25 percent of policy changes since 1945. More influential factors have included ...

Alberta Politics: Poll puts NDP in third place among Albertans – a plausible result despite a pollster’s debatable analysis

PHOTOS: Alberta Premier Rachel Notley. Below: Pollster Quito Maggi of Mainstreet Research, grabbed from his Twitter account, and former PC premier Ed Stelmach, whose personal popularity held through the economic downturn of 2007 and 2008. Late last week, the Calgary Herald reported the results of a poll that indicated Alberta’s NDP government has “plummeted” to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – PressProgress weighs in on the OECD’s findings that Canada’s income inequality is significantly worse than previously assumed. Didier Jacobs argues that our current economic system is anything but meritocratic. And Paul Morrison points out how a poorly-designed tax system forces low-income workers to pay massive effective taxes ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Nicholas Fitz observes that inequality is far worse than the U.S. public believes – even as it already wants to see significant action. And Thomas Piketty updates his policy prescriptions arising out of Capital: As I look back at my discussion of future policy proposals in the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Paul Edwards discusses the availability of a gradual transition to clean energy while avoiding more than 2 degrees of climate change – but only if we start swapping out fossil fuels for renewable energy now. And Christopher Grainger argues that a space race-style approach to research and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Martin Whittaker reminds us that the American public is eager for a far more fair distribution of income than the one provided for by the U.S.’ current political and economic ground rules. But Christo Aivalis writes that there’s a difference between a preference and a cause – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Michael Leachman debunks the claim that progressive tax rates on the rich cause any problems from an economic development standpoint. And Daisy Srblin argues for a strong and unapologetic movement toward a fairer tax system: It is now up to the left to provide an alternative. Let’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Juxtaposition

The current Liberal leader, who apparently saw no reason to think his actions in the present might result in the loss of his party’s self-proclaimed brand: Trudeau said he finds Canadians he talks with when he travels are open to the idea of balancing security and rights. But he conceded that he may have underestimated ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Paul Rosenberg documents how Bernie Sanders is tapping into widespread public desire and support for more socially progressive policies: Sanders is right to think that Scandanavian socialism would be popular here in the U.S., if only people knew more about it. And he’s right to make spreading that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Scott Santens argues that a basic income represents the best way to ensure that the gains from technological advancement are shared by everybody. And Thom Hartmann makes the case for a guaranteed income based on its simplicity and cost-effectiveness, while Mark Sarner sees it mostly as a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – The Broadbent Institute details Rhys Kesselman’s research on how the Cons’ expanded TFSAs are nothing but a giveaway to the wealthy. And Dean Beeby reports on their withholding of EI supplements from the families who most need them – paired with a complete lack of responsibility or ...

Accidental Deliberations: On damaging positions

I haven’t commented yet on the latest wave of federal polls primarily because I don’t see them radically changing my existing take on Canada’s impending election. But I’ll briefly address what looks like an overreaction to the latest numbers by Michael Harris. By way of context, here’s my previous analysis as to how the Cons ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Sean McElwee examines new evidence of the deliberate choice of past U.S. governments dating back to Ronald Reagan to completely discount the policy preferences of anybody but the rich: In a new book, political scientists James Druckman and Lawrence Jacobs examine data on internal polling from U.S. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Michael Schwartz and Kevin Young make the case for a greater focus on influencing corporations and other institutions first and foremost – with the expectation that more fair public policy will be possible if a dominant business sector doesn’t stand in the way. David Wessel points out that ...

Accidental Deliberations: On complexities

Bruce Anderson writes that as some of us have long suspected, a true three-party federal race is developing which will create some new complications for the Cons and Libs alike. But it’s worth pointing out one area where the Cons are in much worse shape than they’ve ever been. Before the 2008 and 2011 elections, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon reviews the Cons’ track record as irresponsible economic and financial managers. Statistics Canada looks at the debt picture facing Canadians and finds young workers and families in particular fighting against increasing debt loads. And Forum finds that no matter how many hangers-on trumpet the theme of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Choosing the wrong side

Following up on this morning’s column, let’s note that there’s another area where the Libs are stubbornly sticking to a previous position whose underpinnings have been even more thoroughly destroyed. The Libs have been at pains to at least offer the perception of changing their direction from nearly everything done by both Stephane Dion and ...