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Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Wolfgang Munchau writes that the rise of right-wing insurrectionism can be traced largely to “centre-left” parties who have focused most of their attention on imposing austerity and catering to the corporate sector while offering little to citizens, while Naomi Klein comments on the role of neoliberal politics . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Owen Jones highlights the toxic stress and other health problems borne disproportionately by members of the LGBT community who face systematic discrimination. And Tayla Smith and Jaitra Sathyandran discuss how temporary foreign workers (and others facing precarious work situations) tend to suffer preventable harm to their health . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Peter Fleming writes that the promise of entrepreneurial self-employment has given way to the nightmare of systematic precarious work: (T)he move to reclassify people as self-employed follows a very simple formula: it helps reduce labour costs and maximise profits for businesses that would rather use contractors than a . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.- Errol Mendes points out that any commitment to securing human rights in our foreign policy is currently limited by the lack of any systematic attempt to see how those rights are being treated. And Rick Mercer… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– George Monbiot comments on the far more important values we’re endangering in the name of constant financial and material growth: To try to stabilise this system, governments behave like soldiers billeted in an ancient manor, burning the furniture, the paintings and the stairs to keep themselves warm . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Jenny Uechi and Warren Bell expose Canada’s embarrassing place as the only government participating in a climate-denial group pushing for a dirty war against the planet. But despite the Harper Cons’ worst efforts, there’s some good news on the climate front – as the use of solar energy . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Thomas Frank reviews Zephyr Teachout’s Corruption in America, and finds there’s even more reason to worry about gross wealth buying power than we could identify before: We think of all the laws passed over the years to restrict money in politics — and of all the ways . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

OPSEU Diablogue: Ebola threat should spark overdue investment in public health

In September Peterborough residents narrowly avoided the first strike in their health unit’s history. Despite acknowledging significant inequities in how they compensate staff, the Peterborough County-City Health Unit argued they couldn’t afford to play catch-up with the smallest of the … Continue reading →

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week.

– Stephen Hwang and Kwame McKenzie discuss the connection between affordable housing and public health and wellness: In 2009, researchers followed 1,200 people in Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver who were homeless or at risk of homelessness. It was found that they experience a high burden of serious health problems . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Andrew Jackson reviews the OECD’s economic recommendations for Canada – featuring a much-needed call for fair taxes on stock options: Special tax breaks for stock options primarily benefit senior corporate executives, especially CEOs of large public companies who are commonly given the right to buy shares in the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Dead Wild Roses: The Business of Smoking

 

Another reason why we need more science and not less in the world. Where smoking has been accurately depicted as hazardous to your health and society the rate goes down. Other places, not so much.

[Source:Al Jazeera]

Filed under: Medicine, Science Tagged: Government Regulations, Medical Science, Public Health, Smoking

. . . → Read More: Dead Wild Roses: The Business of Smoking

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Polly Toynbee writes about the continued spread of privatization based solely on corporatist dogma even in the face of obvious examples of its harm to the public: In the Royal Mail debacle, shares sold at £1.7bn rose to £2.7bn. The 16 investors chosen as “long-term” custodians included . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Linda McQuaig responds to the CCCE’s tax spin by pointing out what’s likely motivating the false attempt to be seen to contribute to society at large: Seemingly out of the blue this week, the head honchos of Canada’s biggest companies, the Canadian Council of Chief Executives, put out . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading.

– Michael Hiltzik writes about the efforts of the corporate sector – including the tobacco and food industries – to produce mass ignorance in order to preserve profits: Proctor, a professor of the history of science at Stanford, is one of the world’s leading experts in agnotology, a neologism . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive: Fracking in Canada: Why the Council of Canadians’ new “Fracktivist’s Toolkit” matters

by: Obert Madondo

In this age of the Harper Conservatives and a rampaging fossil fuel industry, Canadian anti-fracking activism requires more than a sense of environmental and social justice. It requires a toolkit of knowledge about what’s happening and how to effectively respond at the local, national and global level.

The Council of Canadians’ new . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: Fracking in Canada: Why the Council of Canadians’ new “Fracktivist’s Toolkit” matters

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading.

– Zoe Williams interviews George Lakoff about the need for progressive activists and parties to work on changing minds rather than merely pursuing an elusive (and illusory) middle ground: (T)he left, he argues, is losing the political argument – every year, it cedes more ground to the right, under the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

OPSEU Diablogue: Video: When it comes to food, less bad is not good

Earlier this year we posted a link to a video presentation by Dr. Yoni Freedhoff that was supposed to be delivered to the food industry. The Ontario Medical Association got asked to send a representative to speak on what the … Continue reading →

The Canadian Progressive: Sierra Club Canada: Shipment of LIQUID radioactive waste presents unprecedented risks!

By: Sierra Club Canada | Press Release: On Wednesday, May 15, the Sierra Club Niagara Group joined the Nuclear Information and Resource Service, Women’s Indigenous Initiatives, and the International Institute of Concern for Public Health at a press conference on Main Street in front of the Hyatt Hotel in downtown Buffalo. This event was called . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: Sierra Club Canada: Shipment of LIQUID radioactive waste presents unprecedented risks!

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– John Greenwood and CBC News both report on the offshore tax avoidance being revealed through the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. And Susan Lunn observes that Canada’s federal parties are all at least paying lip service to the issue – though of course the Cons’ cuts to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive: Forest Ethics Responds to New Kinder Morgan Pipeline Expansion Proposal

by Forest Ethics | Jan 11, 2013: Yesterday Houston based energy giant Kinder Morgan announced that they planned to further expand their proposed pipeline through the most densely populated areas of the province of British Columbia. The company’s Canadian representative held a telephone press conference yesterday announcing that they planned to formally file a proposal . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: Forest Ethics Responds to New Kinder Morgan Pipeline Expansion Proposal

OPSEU Diablogue: Too frank for the food industry

Last year Dr. Yoni Friedhoff was invited by the Ontario Medical Association to speak at a small food industry association breakfast. Just days before the event, the organizers uninvited Dr. Friedhoff without any explanation. Having prepared his Powerpoint and talk, he decided to … Continue reading →

Canadian Progressive: Harper Conservatives “Designated Countries of Origin” list equals more serious health risks for refugees

By Canadian Doctors for Refugee Care:

With the federal government announcing that it will be revealing its Designated Countries of Origin list to inform its handling of refugees on December 15th, Canadian Doctors for Refugee Care is warning provincial governments, medical professionals and health institutions to brace for more chaos and cases of individuals not . . . → Read More: Canadian Progressive: Harper Conservatives “Designated Countries of Origin” list equals more serious health risks for refugees

Alberta Diary: You can’t overlook convenient hours if you hope to preserve the obvious benefits of public liquor sales

In Alberta, this kid would be buying Jägermeister and Red Bull. Below: The Parkland study; Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall.

In one regard, Alberta’s 1993 experiment in liquor store privatization has been a resounding success. To wit: almost everyone thinks it worked.

I was reminded of this reality earlier this week when the Parkland . . . → Read More: Alberta Diary: You can’t overlook convenient hours if you hope to preserve the obvious benefits of public liquor sales

Five of Five: Calgary Diabetic Pressuring Ab Govt on Promises

A local man suffering from diabetes is hoping a facebook page will start a movement to hold the government accountable.Brent Whitford has dealt with the Type 1 diabetes since he was three years old, and remembers clearly when premier Alison Redford pr… . . . → Read More: Five of Five: Calgary Diabetic Pressuring Ab Govt on Promises

My journey with AIDS...and more!: There are at least a few, if not many, important people with whom I need to have my own conversation about…

…this! It’s certainly not too early to think about Mental Illness Awareness Week When I read the Ottawa Citizen article (linked above) I immediately thought, “Mom will have read that yesterday,” and what an opening it would give me to discuss my own mental health history with her. Not long after sobering up five+ years . . . → Read More: My journey with AIDS…and more!: There are at least a few, if not many, important people with whom I need to have my own conversation about…