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Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Lucy Shaddock offers a response to the Institute for Fiscal Studies’ report on poverty and inequality in the UK, while McKinsey finds that hundreds of millions of people in advanced economies are seein… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Rick Salutin argues that we need to say no to any more trade agreements designed to privilege corporations at the expense of the public. Will Martin reports on the IMF’s long-overdue recognition of the failures of ne… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

The Canadian Progressive: NDP forces Liberals to surrender electoral reform committee majority

The Liberals will no longer exercise majority control over the special parliamentary committee tasked with liberating Canada from its 149-year old anti-democratic first-past-the-post electoral system. The post NDP forces Liberals to surrender electoral… . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: NDP forces Liberals to surrender electoral reform committee majority

Alex's Blog: Alex’s Blog 2016-05-12 18:36:30

A couple of days back, Ed Broadbent, Hugh Segal and I published an op-ed making the case for some form of proportional representation. Yesterday the government announced its process for assessing a range of options, making 2015 the last federal election under our first past the post system. And today the editorial pages are awash … Continue reading . . . → Read More: Alex’s Blog: Alex’s Blog 2016-05-12 18:36:30

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Justin Trudeau’s control over the federal electoral reform committee looks to extend a familiar pattern of top-down government into the design of our electoral system. (And I’ll add one point here which didn’t make it into the column: the … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Northern Reflections: The Fat Is In The Fire

In a superb piece for the Globe and Mail, Ed Broadbent, Alex Himelfarb and Hugh Segal argue that Canada needs true proportional representation. Nothing else will do:The central problem with our winner-take-all system is that the composition of our ele… . . . → Read More: Northern Reflections: The Fat Is In The Fire

wmtc: 39% is not a majority: fair voting now

Will you sign a declaration to make Canada more democratic?Declaration of Voters’ RightsAnd some myth-busting about proportional representation:A ranked ballot is not a voting system.How will anything get done?Is proportional representation constitutio… . . . → Read More: wmtc: 39% is not a majority: fair voting now

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Carol Goar summarizes the Institute for Research on Public Policy’s review of the steps needed to rein in inequality in the long term, while pointing out the one factor which will determine whether any… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Northern Reflections: An Idea Whose Time Has Come

                                          … . . . → Read More: Northern Reflections: An Idea Whose Time Has Come

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, expanding on this post as to Nathan Cullen’s proposal to make sure the outcomes of all plausible electoral systems are taken into account in designing a new one. For further reading…- Again, Cullen’s proposal was reported on here, and discussed… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.- Heather Stewart discusses the possibility of a 20-hour work week to better distribute both work and income. And without going that far, Andrew Jackson suggests that our public policy priorities should include a n… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On double majorities

Nathan Cullen’s proposal for party representation on the Parliamentary committee reviewing electoral reform has received plenty of attention. But it might actually go much further than advertised to validate the results of the committee’s work and legi… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On double majorities

Accidental Deliberations: On strategic choices

Christopher Kam’s series of posts on political parties’ strategy surrounding electoral reform is definitely worth a read. But I’ll stand by the view that there’s another alternative interpretation of the likely outcomes – particularly based on the like… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On strategic choices

Accidental Deliberations: On standards for reform

Others have duly criticized the Star’s editorial on electoral reform. But I’ll argue that it can be brought in line with reasonable expectations with one important change.Simply put, it’s not a problem to insist upon “broad consensus” on a new electora… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On standards for reform

BigCityLib Strikes Back: FPTP Or Not FPTP?

I don’t mind the Cullen/Coyne option, where we adopt a new system, have one election under it to see how we like it, and then have a referendum, where going back to pure FPTP is one of the options. Personally, I like better the idea of ratifying a newl… . . . → Read More: BigCityLib Strikes Back: FPTP Or Not FPTP?

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- Nicholas Fitz observes that inequality is far worse than the U.S. public believes – even as it already wants to see significant action. And Thomas Piketty updates his policy prescriptions arising out of Capital:… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.- Paul Krugman discusses the connection between concentrated wealth and extreme anti-social political behaviour:Wealth can be bad for your soul. That’s not just a hoary piece of folk wisdom; it’s a conclusi… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Owen Jones writes that the UK’s flooding is just one example of what happens when the public sector which is supposed to look out for the common good is slashed out of short-term political calculation. And J. B… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Bill Longstaff: Why a referendum on electoral reform would be a very bad idea

The need for electoral reform in Canada has never been more stark. We have just endured nine years of government by a political party that over sixty per cent of us opposed. That is simply not democratic. We have an electoral system, but we don’t have … . . . → Read More: Bill Longstaff: Why a referendum on electoral reform would be a very bad idea

Accidental Deliberations: On failed diversions

Not surprisingly given my previous comments on the Libs’ electoral reform promise, it’s a plus that they’re sticking with it rather than giving in to any demand for a referendum. And hopefully the temporary diversion raised by the Cons will lead the pa… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On failed diversions

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Desmond Cole rightly slams the stinginess of Ontario’s government in taking support away from parents based on child support which isn’t actually received. And Karl Nerenberg laments Bill Morneau’s decision to … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On voting from experience

If I have any concern with Nathan Cullen’s suggestion that Canada hold a referendum on electoral reform only after seeing a different system in action, it’s that it may concede too much to the people looking to set up roadblocks in the face of a clear … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On voting from experience

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, expanding on these posts as to what might come next as Canada’s political parties map out their strategies on electoral reform.For further reading…- Chantal Hebert wonders whether Justin Trudeau will face internal pressure to renege on his prom… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: On blockages

Yes, Bill Tieleman, you’ve left no doubt that people who are opposed to electoral reform generally are also in favour of a needless and convoluted referendum process to try to block it.But for the many of us who don’t see “no change” as the desired end… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On blockages

Accidental Deliberations: On managing the system

Following up on this post, there doesn’t seem to be much prospect of the Cons making any effort to pursue proportional representation as an alternative to a ranked ballot if Tasha Kheiriddin’s latest reflects their’ thinking. But I’ll point out that th… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On managing the system