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Mind Bending Politics: Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Explained Perfectly

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a trade agreement mostly negotiated in secret by quite a few governments bordering the pacific ocean. Canada has been a part of these negotiations and is committed to ratifying the treaty. Both US presidential candidates are now on the record against this treaty, while current US president Barack Obama has […] . . . → Read More: Mind Bending Politics: Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Explained Perfectly

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- In the wake of yesterday’s Brexit vote, David Dayen points out how the failure of technocratic policy left many voters believing they had nothing to lose in abandoning the European Union. Dawn Foster highlights the r… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive: Canada’s Surveillance Crisis: Spy Agencies Must Come Clean

Three years after Edward Snowden’s eye-opening state surveillance revelations, it’s time for the Communications Security Establishment and Canada’s other spy agencies to come clean. The post Canada’s Surveillance Crisis: Spy Agencies Must Come Clean… . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: Canada’s Surveillance Crisis: Spy Agencies Must Come Clean

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- Cynthia Kaufman discusses Moses Naim’s theory that while a transnational ruling class has managed to exercise almost total control over the functions of government, it’s set to lose power over the public at l… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Christopher Jencks discusses why the U.S.’ poor are only getting poorer (in part due to the misapprehension that social programs aren’t available) in reviewing Kathryn Edin and Luke Shaefer’s $2.00 a Day: Livin… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: Why Telecom Transparency Reporting in Canada Still Falls Short

Internet law expert Michael Geist explains how Rogers Communications’ recent transparency report “provides new insights into how much – or how little – Canadians know about when their personal information is disclosed to government agencies.” The … . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: Why Telecom Transparency Reporting in Canada Still Falls Short

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Caroline Plante reports on Quebec’s scourge of medical extra-billing and user fees (as identified by its own Auditor General). And Aaron Derfel notes that the federal government has done nothing to app… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- Tom Parkin writes about the growing divide between the lucky few who are siphoning wealth out of Canada, and the mass of people facing a precarious economic future. – PressProgress highlights much the same disti… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.- Branko Milanovic discusses how our current means of measuring inequality may leave out the most important part of the story in the form of wealth deliberately hidden from public view:(T)here are at least two prob… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- The BBC reports that even UK business groups are acknowledging that excessive executive pay is leading to public concern and distrust in the state of the economy. And Alex Hern notes that Steve Wozniak for one isn’t … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Duncan Cameron discusses how deficit hysteria has overshadowed the far more important issues raised by the Trudeau Libs’ inaugural budget:Ottawa deficit spending is not big enough to stimulate an econo… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week.- Tom Parkin points out that the Trudeau Liberals are falling far short of their promises to fund infrastructure even while tripling their planned deficit. – Jared Bernstein highlights how top-down block grants coupl… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- David MacDonald argues that the federal budget should focus on desperately-needed public investments – with any revenue issues dealt with by raising taxes where past cuts have produced nothing of value. And Lead… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- Jared Bernstein is hopeful that the era of expansive corporate rights agreements is coming to an end. Paul Krugman notes that there’s no evidence anybody has gained economically from the spread of those agree… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive: On Data Privacy Day, Reclaim Your Privacy Rights

Today, January 28, is data privacy day, a day dedicated to raising awareness relating to the protection of your privacy and personal data. Lately, Canada’s law enforcement agencies have been relentlessly campaigning for the right of warrantless access … . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: On Data Privacy Day, Reclaim Your Privacy Rights

Mind Bending Politics: Supreme Court Says Get Out of Our Data to Trudeau Government

The Supreme Court of Canada, the Federal Court, Federal Court of Appeal, Court Martial Appeal Court and Tax Court are preparing to take the Canadian government to task on ensuring independence from the federal government regarding its data. Under the past conservative government, all these levels of the courts were to submit to a super-IT department as […] . . . → Read More: Mind Bending Politics: Supreme Court Says Get Out of Our Data to Trudeau Government

Mind Bending Politics: Canadian Government Could Benefit From Town Hall Public Consultations on Anti-Terror Bill

(Canadian Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale) During the election the Liberals heard from Canadians on the new anti-terror bill C-51, and promised to repeal sections of this bill that are problematic. We still don’t know exactly which provisions will be repealed. This past Friday, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale took to the airwaves stating that […] . . . → Read More: Mind Bending Politics: Canadian Government Could Benefit From Town Hall Public Consultations on Anti-Terror Bill

Scripturient: The birth and death of privacy

I was in a local grocery store recently and it was my misfortune to enter, and walk most of the same aisles at the same time as a voluble woman shopper. She spent her entire time there on her cell phone. From before she entered, through the time she … . . . → Read More: Scripturient: The birth and death of privacy

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Les Leopold rightly argues that financial and political elites won’t offer a more fair distribution of wealth or power unless they’re forced to do so:Right now, we lack a robust mass movement with the power to reclai… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Mind Bending Politics: Did The Liberals Cave on Anti-Terror Bill C-51?

From the Paris attacks to last week’s mass shootings in California, like many in the civilized world over the past month I’ve been trying to wrap my head around these attacks, and why under mass surveillance are they continuing to happen with greater frequency. Last week the 42nd parliament resumed with no word or mention […] . . . → Read More: Mind Bending Politics: Did The Liberals Cave on Anti-Terror Bill C-51?

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Paul Krugman reviews Robert Reich’s upcoming book, with a particular focus on the connection between corporate power and growing inequality:…Reich makes a very good case that widening inequality larg… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Roderick Benns interviews Michael Clague about his work on a basic income dating back nearly fifty years. And Glen Pearson’s series of posts about a basic income is well worth a read.

- Meanwhile, Julia Belluz interviews Sir Michael Marmot about the connection between inequality and poor social health. And Gillian White writes about a lack of access to credit (and the resulting reliance on payday lenders) as just one of the many extra stresses facing people with lower incomes.

- Jamie Livingstone is optimistic that Scotland has hit a tipping point in (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: Real Change on Digital Policy May Take Time Under New Liberal Government

Law professor and copyright expert Michael Geist suggests that the new Liberal government may wait until 2017 before implementing significant change to Canada’s telecom, broadcast, copyright, and privacy policies.

The post Michael Geist: Real Change on Digital Policy May Take Time Under New Liberal Government appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: On rush jobs

Yes, one of the Libs’ first orders of business in government should be to rein in the worst excesses of C-51. But they instead seem to be limiting their plans to something else entirely: A key feature of the replacement legislation is expected to be the creation of a multi-party, joint House of Commons-Senate committee, sworn to secrecy and reporting to the prime minister and through him to Parliament. It would have a full-time staff, access to the necessary secret information and be tasked with strategic oversight of every government department and agency with national security responsibilities, according to a source familiar with (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: How the TPP Puts Canadian Privacy at Risk

Internet law expert Michael Geist explains how the Trans Pacific Partnership deal’s “several anti-privacy measures” would restrict the government’s ability to safeguards Canadian’s privacy rights, and sensitive personal information such as financial and health data.

The post Michael Geist: How the TPP Puts Canadian Privacy at Risk appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.