Prog Blog’s Flickr Photostream

The Canadian Progressive: On Data Privacy Day, Reclaim Your Privacy Rights

Today, January 28, is data privacy day, a day dedicated to raising awareness relating to the protection of your privacy and personal data. Lately, Canada’s law enforcement agencies have been relentlessly campaigning for the right of warrantless access … . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: On Data Privacy Day, Reclaim Your Privacy Rights

Mind Bending Politics: Supreme Court Says Get Out of Our Data to Trudeau Government

The Supreme Court of Canada, the Federal Court, Federal Court of Appeal, Court Martial Appeal Court and Tax Court are preparing to take the Canadian government to task on ensuring independence from the federal government regarding its data. Under the past conservative government, all these levels of the courts were to submit to a super-IT department as […] . . . → Read More: Mind Bending Politics: Supreme Court Says Get Out of Our Data to Trudeau Government

Mind Bending Politics: Canadian Government Could Benefit From Town Hall Public Consultations on Anti-Terror Bill

(Canadian Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale) During the election the Liberals heard from Canadians on the new anti-terror bill C-51, and promised to repeal sections of this bill that are problematic. We still don’t know exactly which provisions will be repealed. This past Friday, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale took to the airwaves stating that […] . . . → Read More: Mind Bending Politics: Canadian Government Could Benefit From Town Hall Public Consultations on Anti-Terror Bill

Scripturient: The birth and death of privacy

I was in a local grocery store recently and it was my misfortune to enter, and walk most of the same aisles at the same time as a voluble woman shopper. She spent her entire time there on her cell phone. From before she entered, through the time she … . . . → Read More: Scripturient: The birth and death of privacy

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Les Leopold rightly argues that financial and political elites won’t offer a more fair distribution of wealth or power unless they’re forced to do so:Right now, we lack a robust mass movement with the power to reclai… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Mind Bending Politics: Did The Liberals Cave on Anti-Terror Bill C-51?

From the Paris attacks to last week’s mass shootings in California, like many in the civilized world over the past month I’ve been trying to wrap my head around these attacks, and why under mass surveillance are they continuing to happen with greater frequency. Last week the 42nd parliament resumed with no word or mention […] . . . → Read More: Mind Bending Politics: Did The Liberals Cave on Anti-Terror Bill C-51?

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Paul Krugman reviews Robert Reich’s upcoming book, with a particular focus on the connection between corporate power and growing inequality:…Reich makes a very good case that widening inequality larg… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Roderick Benns interviews Michael Clague about his work on a basic income dating back nearly fifty years. And Glen Pearson’s series of posts about a basic income is well worth a read.

- Meanwhile, Julia Belluz interviews Sir Michael Marmot about the connection between inequality and poor social health. And Gillian White writes about a lack of access to credit (and the resulting reliance on payday lenders) as just one of the many extra stresses facing people with lower incomes.

- Jamie Livingstone is optimistic that Scotland has hit a tipping point in (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: Real Change on Digital Policy May Take Time Under New Liberal Government

Law professor and copyright expert Michael Geist suggests that the new Liberal government may wait until 2017 before implementing significant change to Canada’s telecom, broadcast, copyright, and privacy policies.

The post Michael Geist: Real Change on Digital Policy May Take Time Under New Liberal Government appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: On rush jobs

Yes, one of the Libs’ first orders of business in government should be to rein in the worst excesses of C-51. But they instead seem to be limiting their plans to something else entirely: A key feature of the replacement legislation is expected to be the creation of a multi-party, joint House of Commons-Senate committee, sworn to secrecy and reporting to the prime minister and through him to Parliament. It would have a full-time staff, access to the necessary secret information and be tasked with strategic oversight of every government department and agency with national security responsibilities, according to a source familiar with (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: How the TPP Puts Canadian Privacy at Risk

Internet law expert Michael Geist explains how the Trans Pacific Partnership deal’s “several anti-privacy measures” would restrict the government’s ability to safeguards Canadian’s privacy rights, and sensitive personal information such as financial and health data.

The post Michael Geist: How the TPP Puts Canadian Privacy at Risk appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Things Are Good: Vote on Canada’s Digital Future

On Monday the 19th Canadians will cast their ballots for who they think should run the nation. Open Media has released a report card on where the political parties stand on digital issues impacting Canadians. It’s with no surprise that the conservatives get a failing grade. The good news is that every other party support online freedoms.

Don’t want the Canadian government reading your email and watching what you do online? Vote them out this election.

We have assessed the main parties on the digital policy issues Canadians told us matter most. The grades below are a crowdsourced assessment by (Read more…)

OpenMedia.ca: Kent Roach & Craig Forcese: Press the reset button on security

The ongoing work of Professors Kent Roach and Craig Forcese on C-51 provides the most exhaustive analysis of the bill and is a must-read for anyone concerned with the issue.

Article by Kent Roach and Craig Forcese for the National Post

Security issues are a campaign issue — at least we think they are. To date, little has actually been said on the topic, and what has been said amounts to the parties doubling down on entrenched and vague (even symbolic) positions.

read more

OpenMedia.ca: Ian Mulgew: Court chooses Internet privacy in limiting police access to text messages

When you send a text message, do you assume it stays just between you and your friend? What about the police?

Article by Ian Mulgew for the Vancouver Sun

The B.C. Court of Appeal has struck a blow for Internet privacy at the expense of letting walk a Nanaimo man accused of drug trafficking because of his text messages.

read more

Mind Bending Politics: Conservative Party Hacking Into Facebook Accounts For Likes

Has the Conservative Party of Canada hacked into your profile and “liked” their Facebook page on your behalf without your knowledge or consent? Reports are popping up including one from a reporter at the CBC that they are being “like hijacked” by the Conservative party. According to a CBC report, the hijacked likes could be […] . . . → Read More: Mind Bending Politics: Conservative Party Hacking Into Facebook Accounts For Likes

OpenMedia.ca: CBC: SYNful Knock cyberspying malware takes over Cisco routers

A cyberspying malware has hit multiple industries and government agencies through attacks to Cisco routers.

Article by Thomson Reuters on CBC

Security researchers say they have uncovered clandestine attacks across three continents on the routers that direct traffic around the internet, potentially allowing suspected cyberspies to harvest vast amounts of data while going undetected.

read more

OpenMedia.ca: Let’s make Canada’s parties endorse our pro-Internet action plan

Exciting news! Green Party leader Elizabeth May has just announced her endorsement of our crowdsourced pro-Internet action plan. So far Ms. May is the first major party leader to do so – and we’re thrilled to have her waving the flag for Canada’s Internet.

This is great news for Canada’s pro-Internet movement and never would have happened without so many people speaking up to support our plan. Now we need to keep up the pressure on all the party leaders, to ensure our action plan can be put into law.

read more

OpenMedia.ca: The Varsity: Why Bill C-51 (and your privacy) matter

Here’s why our privacy is so important to us.  If you value yours, keep speaking up to repeal C-51 at KillC51.ca

Article by Kaitlyn Simpson for The Varsity

The year is 2011: Edward Snowden has just come forth with a shocking disclosure regarding the United States National Security Agency’s invasive and secretive practices. The initial media storm gradually grew into a serious and thoughtful conversation about what privacy means in our technological age — naturally, some were outraged, while others felt it was justified.

read more

OpenMedia.ca: Star: Why Internet privacy should be a key election issue: Geist

This election, we need to put privacy front and centre to ensure every Canadian has surveillance-free Internet. Sign our pro-Internet vote pledge today. 

Article by Michael Geist for the Toronto Star

Canada’s controversial anti-terrorism bill, Bill C-51, has emerged as a key talking point in the current election campaign. 

Pointing to its big implications for privacy and surveillance, the NDP sees political opportunity by emphasizing its opposition to the bill, while the Liberals have been forced to defend their decision to support it (but call for amendments if elected). The Conservatives unsurprisingly view the bill as evidence of (Read more…)

OpenMedia.ca: CTV: Digital privacy concerns ‘the new normal’ as users pay with personal information

Personal information is becoming the new currency of the digital age.

Article by Peter Henderson (Canadian Press) for CTV

TORONTO — Microsoft’s new Windows 10 operating system has been praised for improving upon the flaws of its predecessor, but the company is facing widespread criticism for what some are calling invasive data collection.

read more

OpenMedia.ca: Georgia Straight: OpenMedia encourages voters to consider policies around access, privacy in federal election

Check out this amazing coverage of our pro-Internet election plan on The Georgia Straight! The Internet is something we shouldn’t take for granted. We should take action to have our democratic rights as citizens, to make sure it stays open, accessible and free for everyone. This election, vote for the Internet! OurDigitalFuture.ca

Article by Stephen Hui for the Georgia Straight 

Stephen Harper’s Conservative government represents a “lost 10 years” for the Internet in Canada, according to a digital-rights advocate.

read more

OpenMedia.ca: Vice: Canadian Cops Want to Search Your Mail

Update: The RCMP is now going after your mail.

Article by Justin Ling for Vice

With a federal election in its home stretch, Canada’s chiefs of police have issued a wish list of investigative powers they are hoping that the country’s next prime minister can deliver — everything from allowing them to search Canadians’ mail, to pulling back the curtain on anonymity online.

read more

OpenMedia.ca: Common Sense Canadian: Why privacy matters in this Canadian election

Most Canadians do not want to give up their privacy rights. This election, will you vote for online privacy? Pledge your vote at OurDigitalFuture.ca

Article by Kevin Grandia for Common Sense Canadian 

While you are out this weekend enjoying the last days of summer on the beach and the RCMP come by to check whether your cooler is full of (gasp) beer or wine, you have every right to tell them (I would suggest politely) that no, they cannot look in your cooler.

read more

The Canadian Progressive: Ashley Madison’s misguided attempts to put the genie back in the bottle

Ashley Madison’s use of DMCA takedown notices to social media platforms in an attempt to stop the dissemination of the site users’ hacked personal information “may violate the DMCA itself,” argues Mitch Stoltz, an attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

The post Ashley Madison’s misguided attempts to put the genie back in the bottle appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

OpenMedia.ca: National NewsWatch: Police demand access to your online records without a warrant

Article by Jim Bronksill for the Canadian Press

OTTAWA – A new administrative scheme that would allow police to obtain basic information about Internet subscribers without a warrant is one option being considered by federal officials following a landmark Supreme Court ruling that curbed access to such data, Canadian police chiefs say.

The glimpse into federal deliberations about how to address the highly influential court decision comes in a newly published background document from the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, which is urging the government to fill the legislative gap.

read more