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Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Hassan Yussuff and other labour leaders offer their take on how we can develop a more equitable global trade system: The next challenge before us is to build on and improve all post-CETA trade and investment deals to ensure they meet a progressive trade model. We suggest several . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

The Disaffected Lib: Oh Yeah, About that "Post-National" Business

Justin Trudeau has proclaimed Canada the “first post-national state.” In fact, we’re not the first country to be smeared with that label. In fact we may be the last. Justin’s world view is hopelessly outdated.

…one of the paradoxes of globalization has been that, as cross-border travel, migration, and trade have increased, attachment to national . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Oh Yeah, About that "Post-National" Business

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Stephen Hawking discusses the urgent need to address inequality and environmental destruction as people are both more fearful for their futures, and more aware of what’s being taken away from them: (T)he lives of the richest people in the most prosperous parts of the world are agonisingly visible . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Parchment in the Fire: First Brexit then Trump. Is Italy next for the west’s populist wave? | World news | The Guardian

Italians will soon vote in a referendum on constitutional reforms which could have dramatic results for all of Europe

Source: First Brexit then Trump. Is Italy next for the west’s populist wave? | World news | The Guardian

Filed under: Eurozone crisis Tagged: Five Star Movement, Italy, Populism

. . . → Read More: Parchment in the Fire: First Brexit then Trump. Is Italy next for the west’s populist wave? | World news | The Guardian

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Lana Payne comments on the importance of the labour movement in ensuring that economic growth translates into benefits for workers: The findings of a study released this month by the Canadian Centre for Study of Living Standards, an Ottawa-based think-tank, reinforces why there is a “pervasive sense among . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Wolfgang Munchau writes that the rise of right-wing insurrectionism can be traced largely to “centre-left” parties who have focused most of their attention on imposing austerity and catering to the corporate sector while offering little to citizens, while Naomi Klein comments on the role of neoliberal politics . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.- Larry Elliott discusses how the rise of Donald Trump and other exclusionary populists can be traced to the failed promises of neoliberal economics:The fact is that the US middle class, which in Britain we would c… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading:- Ross Douthat (!) discusses the distinction between actual cosmopolitanism, and the global elitism that’s instead come to dominate international power relations:Genuine cosmopolitanism is a rare thing. It require… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- In the wake of yesterday’s Brexit vote, David Dayen points out how the failure of technocratic policy left many voters believing they had nothing to lose in abandoning the European Union. Dawn Foster highlights the r… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading.- Lana Payne writes about the need for a Bernie Sanders in Canada to highlight and oppose the privilege of the wealthy few:It is in this context of blatant unfairness — rules for the rich and rules for… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Edgardo Sepulveda writes about the role of the federal government in combating inequality – while noting that Canada has gone in the wrong direction over the past few decades. And Michal Rozworski points out that we’… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week.- Roshini Nair reviews Jim Stanford’s re-released Economics for Everyone, with a particular focus on the need not to give up on the prospect of change for the better: Although economics might be the dismal science, t… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Martha Friendly examines what a “national child care program” actually means. And Jim Stanford makes a compelling economic case as to why Canada needs one: In the case of early childhood education, however, this standard claim of government “poverty” is exactly backwards.  Because there is overwhelming and credible . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Robert Reich describes how U.S. voters are rejecting the concept of a ruling class from both the left and the right – while noting that it’s vital to get the answer right as to which alternative is worth pursuing. And Owen Jones sees Jeremy Corbyn’s rise as . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Tessa Jowell writes that we need to treat inequality as a disease which can be cured through effective public policy, but the Star points out that the Cons have instead gone out of their way to make it worse. Fair Vote Canada interviews J. Peter Venton about . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that to start your year.

– Ian Welsh comments on the challenges we face in trying to turn wealth increasingly concentrated in the hands of a few into a better world for everybody: The irony is that we have, again, produced a cornucopia.  We have the potential to create an abundance society, the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

The Disaffected Lib: Listen Up. Does This Sound Familiar?

It seems to be an unavoidable part of neoliberalism – the sense of being ruled, not governed by consent.  It’s the degradation of democracy, the detachment of the rulers from the ruled that is paralleled by the compression of the political spectrum so that one party becomes largely indistinguishable from the others, all of . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Listen Up. Does This Sound Familiar?

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Polly Toynbee looks at how the UK is now treating children in need as investment opportunities to be exploited by investors, rather than people to be assisted. And Mark Taliano writes that privatization is a problem rather than a solution when it comes to providing public services.

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading.

– Alyssa Battistoni writes that a universal basic income could go a long way toward solving environmental and economic problems alike by placing a focus on sustainable quality of life rather than increasing consumer consumption: If overconsumption is actually the problem, we can’t fix it by consuming more, however . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading.

– D.L. Tice writes that it’s becoming more and more difficult for the right to ignore the spread of income inequality – and the reality that only public policy, not faith in the market, can produce a more fair distribution of income. Which is particularly important in light of . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Paul Krugman explains how one’s political values figure to affect one’s view of evidence as to the success or failure of a policy: (T)he liberal and conservative movements are not at all symmetric in their goals. Conservatives want smaller government as an end in itself; liberals don’t seek . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading.

– The Star offers an editorial on the continued increase in wage inequality in Canada, highlighting the complete lack of any connection between accomplishment and executive compensation: (T)he country’s economic performance has changed dramatically. In 2007, when Mackenzie began, the Canadian economy was growing by leaps and bounds, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Politics and its Discontents: Some Low-Hanging Fruit

Feeling singularly uninspired this morning, I offer a tidbit of the obvious: ‘Ford Nation,’ that much vaunted segment of the population that stands by their man no matter what, is under-educated and from lower-income backgrounds. Since I am not one of those that the Fords and their right-wing fellow travellers like to contemptuously characterize . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: Some Low-Hanging Fruit

The Ranting Canadian: Peter Kormos memorial on May 11, 2013 in Thorold, Ontario

Peter Kormos memorial on May 11, 2013 in Thorold, Ontario:

Click on the above link for details, and see my last post for more information about his life, which ended far too soon.

If you see grey boxes above, click on one of them to see photos of Peter.

. . . → Read More: The Ranting Canadian: Peter Kormos memorial on May 11, 2013 in Thorold, Ontario

The Ranting Canadian: Last weekend, Canada lost a beloved, well-respected, honest,…

Last weekend, Canada lost a beloved, well-respected, honest, persuasive, gruff-voiced, hard-working, non-conformist, friendly, principled, down-to-earth man of the people who drank and smoked, wore cowboy boots, stood up for the little guy and was re-elected several times.

No, I’m not talking about that asshole Ralph Klein, whose merits and accomplishments are more . . . → Read More: The Ranting Canadian: Last weekend, Canada lost a beloved, well-respected, honest,…