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Politics and its Discontents: More Reflections on Leadership

The other day, in my post on political leadership, I chose Toronto Mayor Rob Ford as the figure to contrast what I consider to be the much more mature and thoughtful approach of Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne. My exclusion of the more obvious figure of comparison, Progressive Conservative Leader Tim Hudak, was intentional, given that I have written so much about him in the past, each post essentially observing the same thing: his addiction to ideological bromides as substitutes for real policy.

That dearth of vision was much in evidence in Hudak’s fundraising dinner in Toronto the other day. Saying

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Politics and its Discontents: From The Horse’s Mouth

Actually, were I not committed to a certain level of decorum on this blog, the mouth is not the part of the horse’s anatomy I would have chosen as the point of origin for young Tim Hudak’s latest utterances that are simply a pathetic recycling of pas… . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: From The Horse’s Mouth

Politics and its Discontents: From Platitude Central – Part 4

For part 4 in my examination of political platitudes that substitute for substantive policy pronouncements, I turn to the Ontario Liberal leadership race to replace Premier Dalton McGuinty, a race that thus far has been ‘full of sound and fury, signi… . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: From Platitude Central – Part 4

Politics and its Discontents: From Platitude Central – Part 2

“This country has entered some very choppy waters. If elected leader, I will provide a firm hand at the helm to bring the economy safely back to shore.” “Canada has a greatness that has barely been tapped. I am confident that I have the vision… . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: From Platitude Central – Part 2

Environmental Law Alert Blog: On importing U.S. “Job-Killing” rhetoric

Monday, May 28, 2012

The phrase “job killing regulation” is beginning to enter Canadian discussions about environmental laws and Bill C-38 – the Budget Implementation Bill which would repeal several laws that protect nature, democracy and marginalized society.  This phrase has been embraced by politicians in the U.S. who are seeking to gut environmental laws there, despite having been discredited by a number of studies.  It would be unfortunate to have this inaccurate and misleading phrase become a prominent part of Canadian political discourse (more below on why it’s inaccurate and misleading). 

The phrase “job killing

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