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Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- Greg Jericho is the latest to weigh in on the false promises of neoliberalism:An article in the IMF’s latest issue of is journal Finance and Development notes that “instead of delivering growth, some neolibe… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Regina City Council’s embarrassing heel-dragging in response to the David Suzuki Foundation’s Blue Dot Declaration on environmental rights contrasts against the spread of trade agreements with virtually no scrutiny.For further reading…- … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your election day reading.

– Ed Finn discusses how neoliberalism is damaging Canada, and what we need to do to reverse its influence: Corporate influence on federal politics, the country’s flawed electoral system, and the staunch pursuit of a political and economic ideology since the 1980s that has threatened some of Canada’s . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On game theories

Paul Dechene’s riff off of this post is definitely worth a read. But while we’re largely in agreement on the significance of polls, I will challenge his wider view as to what election coverage means: Policies? Platforms? These are not the weapons political parties wield in an election. Those are the clothes political hopefuls wear. They . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On game theories

Accidental Deliberations: Apparently they’ll let anybody blather away on the intertoobz

Here, for instance, is me chatting with Paul Dechene.

(And to correct myself, the impending provincial election is the second under fixed election dates – though the first where it’s lining up with an associated federal election.)

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Duncan Cameron discusses how Canada can respond to being stalled economically: In 2011 median earnings in Canada were $30,000. That means one-half of Canadian workers earned less than $30,000. What is more to the point is that earnings in 2011 were $1,800 below the level attained in 1977 . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, discussing what elements of Saskatchewan’s referendum law look to have worked properly in Regina’s wastewater treatment plant referendum process – and where there’s some obvious room for improvement where future issues call for a vote among citizens.

For further reading…– While I note in the column that the 10% signature threshold seems to serve . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Today is of course voting day in Regina’s wastewater treatment plant referendum – and you can get voting information here. And Paul Dechene explains his personal Yes vote by pointing to the need for public control over our infrastructure, while Brian Webb highlights the importance of the treatment . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: #wwtp Referendum Roundup

A few links and notes as Regina’s wastewater referendum approaches tomorrow.

– Jason Hammond explains that his Yes vote will be based largely on concerns about the City’s dishonesty and sense of entitlement in trying to push through a P3 model. And Paul Dechene provides the full list of City shenanigans throughout the referendum process.

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: #wwtp Referendum Roundup

Accidental Deliberations: On double standards

Simon Enoch, Paul Dechene and Stephen Whitworth have already weighed in on the City of Regina’s choice to blow its nose on a petition that reflects citizen engagement in action. But I’m surprised nobody’s yet pointed out the vastly different treatment between two different aspects of the petition.

As Dechene notes, the City took two . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On double standards

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– The Globe and Mail weighs in on the Lac-Mégantic tragedy by pointing out that we should be far more concerned about public safety than technical defences and excuses. Saskboy notes that as soon as a corporation’s business choices lead to a massive public disaster, the result is a . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Raz Godelnik challenges the all-too-conventional wisdom that corporations (and indeed individuals) should see tax avoidance and evasion as virtues: One of the most common arguments is that the tax-avoidance techniques used by corporations like Starbucks or Google are legal and therefore they’re not to be blamed, but the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Linda McQuaig highlights how attacks on workers are used to distract attention from the systematic transfer of wealth to those who need it least: As long as the right can keep workers envious and suspicious of each other, the focus won’t be on those at the top, where . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Dan Gardner rightly notes that we should be encouraging more public advocacy from charities and other groups with useful input to offer into policy debates – not shutting it down as the Cons are doing: “Many charities have acquired a wealth of knowledge about how government policies affect . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Roy Romanow rightly notes that Canada’s federal government needs to take a lead role in building our public health care system, rather than abandoning the field to the province.

– Now that the Cons’ budget has raised the question of whether we can afford to do even . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

This and that to end your week.

– Jeffrey Simpson discusses how the Cons have diminished Canada’s place on the world stage: For those who care about Canada’s international reputation and Canada’s ability to influence others in the pursuit of Canada’s self-interest, these are discouraging days.

Everywhere, there is penny-pinching that makes no sense, a . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links