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Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how people generally have a better idea about the facts underlying our political choices than they suggest in response to an ordinary poll – and how we can make better decisions by looking to the root causes of that distinction. For further re… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: By invitation only

Yes, Paul McLeod’s report that Stephen Harper will go through a three-month election period without meeting a single person who hasn’t been previously vetted by partisan operatives is pretty much the logical extension of the Harper Cons’ attitude toward the public. But it’s worth offering a reminder how that relates to the flood of propaganda . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: By invitation only

Progressive Proselytizing: "We’re better than news, we’re truthful"

So says Kory Teneycke, the former VP of the new defunct Sun News Network and now Director of Communications for the PMO. The irony here is simply too much. He is at least half right. Sun News Network was premised on just about anything but the tru… . . . → Read More: Progressive Proselytizing: "We’re better than news, we’re truthful"

Progressive Proselytizing: "We’re better than news, we’re truthful"

So says Kory Teneycke, the former VP of the new defunct Sun News Network and now Director of Communications for the PMO. 

The irony here is simply too much. He is at least half right. Sun News Network was premised on just about anything but the truth. It was highly partisan and served precisely to . . . → Read More: Progressive Proselytizing: "We’re better than news, we’re truthful"

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Paul Krugman writes that the ultra-wealthy’s contempt for anybody short of their own class is becoming more and more explicit around the globe – even when it comes to basic rights like the ability to vote: It’s always good when leaders tell the truth, especially if that wasn’t . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

The Scott Ross: Flaherty’s Curtain

Jim Flaherty was unethical, incompetent and he should have been fired. Those aren’t my words, they’re Thomas Mulcair’s, spoken just last year in Question Period. Yet after the former Finance Minister’s death, Mulcair has called him a good man and a gre… . . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: Flaherty’s Curtain

The Scott Ross: Flaherty’s Curtain

Jim Flaherty was unethical, incompetent and he should have been fired. Those aren’t my words, they’re Thomas Mulcair’s, spoken just last year in Question Period. Yet after the former Finance Minister’s death, Mulcair has called him a good man and a great public servant.

There’s no doubt that the NDP Leader genuinely mourns the . . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: Flaherty’s Curtain

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Yves Smith notes that a short-sighted focus on returns for shareholders generally represents a poor allocation of resources even on the level of a single corporation – while also pointing out what that mindset does when shared across the business sector: As the Occupy Wall Street movement correctly . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– The New York Times editorial board points out that a higher minimum wage can produce clear economic benefits for businesses as well as for workers: One 2013 study by three economists — Arindrajit Dube, T. William Lester and Michael Reich — compared the experiences of businesses in neighboring . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Dean Baker discusses the strong relationship between union organization and the elimination of poverty: A simple regression shows that a 10 percentage point increase in the percentage of workers covered by a union contract is associated with a 0.7 percentage point drop in the poverty rate. (This result . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Jenny Carson asks what governments are doing to lift poor workers out of poverty. (Spoiler alert: the Cons’ answer is “why would we want to do that?”).

– Meanwhile, Kemal Dervis and Uri Dadush discuss the desperate need to rein in inequality in the U.S.: As it . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Frances Russell discusses the inevitable collateral damage to our planet from the Cons’ war on science: Over the past 200 years, Canadians built on flood plains because “we thought we had relatively stable climate — the climate we experienced over the past century,” Sandford told his CBC Radio . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Bea Vongdouangchanh reports on Kevin Page’s concerns that the Cons are set to effectively destroy the PBO. And the Star’s editorial board slams Stephen Harper’s war against transparency and accountability in general: Stonewalling, foot-dragging and contempt for Parliament pay. At least that’s what the federal government appears to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Bill Curry reports on what looks like a thoroughly warped view of the role of the Minister of Justice and Parliament in assessing the constitutionality of legislation (h/t to bigcitylib): Ottawa is crafting legislation that risks running afoul of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms without informing Parliament, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading.

– Daniel Wilson takes a look at how far too many in the media went along with the Harper Cons’ hatchet job against First Nations: (C)ompare the generalized outrage last week to the shrug elicited by the non-indigenous mayors around the country who have resigned after corruption allegations, are . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Tim Harper slams the Cons for yet another omnibus abuse of parliamentary democracy: Stephen Harper didn’t invent prorogation and omnibus legislation, but he has made two arcane polysyllabic political terms part of our everyday lexicon, improving our vocabulary but diminishing our democracy.

His shut-it-down and take-it-or-leave-it approach . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

The Scott Ross: The US Supreme Court & The Health of America

Though it is unclear whether Obamacare will improve the health of Americans, the recent US Supreme Court ruling will at least improve the health of American institutions.

America is a sick country, not only because of the millions of people uninsured and vulnerable to the cost of already one of the most expensive health care . . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: The US Supreme Court & The Health of America

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading…

– No, we shouldn’t read too much into the first wave of polling following Thomas Mulcair’s election as NDP leader. But there are a couple of points where the early returns are far enough out of line with expectations to be worth pointing out. First, there’s the comparison . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

The Scott Ross: Superpowers Have Super-partisanship

When you concentrate the world’s politics in one superpower, extreme polarization is inevitable. The vitriolic partisanship that has only reached record levels in the United States has increased because the country’s influence has.

George Washington hated political parties, he warned they could destroy the nation. In his farewell address in 1796 Washington warned . . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: Superpowers Have Super-partisanship

About that State Funeral

When the PM offered a state funeral for Jack Layton, I suspect most were mildly surprised since the protocol dictates that state funerals are reserved for Prime Ministers, Governor-Generals and Cabinet Ministers. Nobody else, Opposition Leaders included, makes the cut… unless the Prime Minister says they do. But under the circumstances a state funeral just […] . . . → Read More: About that State Funeral

Working against a permanent Conservative majority

This originated as a comment over at Thwap’s place, but perhaps I should expand on it a bit.Call me a hair-splitter if you must, but while certain individual Liberal activists might be open to some new electoral thinking, I wouldn’t be so sanguine abou… . . . → Read More: Working against a permanent Conservative majority

Things fall apart, the centre cannot hold

My friends, there’s no denying the impact of the past couple of days. The way it stands now, we’re going to have to live with a Harper majority for the next four or five years. And while it’s nice to fantasize about the Conservatives doing themselv… . . . → Read More: Things fall apart, the centre cannot hold

Montreal Simon says it even better

Just to reinforce my point about the partisan backbiting.I note this morning that Simon’s got an excellent post addressing some of the same things, but he says it better than I can.  Go and read it now.He manages, in passing, to highlight a p… . . . → Read More: Montreal Simon says it even better

The Roundhouse: Representative Independence versus Caucus Control

Behind all the Sturm und Drang engendered by Dr. Raj Sherman’s letter, comments and subsequent removal from the PC caucus there are several stories. The specifics of what happened and why are known only to those involved, and I won’t speculate. There i… . . . → Read More: The Roundhouse: Representative Independence versus Caucus Control