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The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten things to know about the CPP debate

This fall, Canada’s Parliament will debate a proposal to expand the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). And over at the Behind the Numbers web site, I’m co-author of a blog post titled “Ten things to know about the CPP debate.” The blog post’s other co-authors are Allan Moscovitch and Richard Lochead.

Points raised in the blog . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten things to know about the CPP debate

The Progressive Economics Forum: Equal Pay Day

Every year, women around the world celebrate (angrily) the day their average full-time full-year earnings have caught up to men’s average full-time full-year earnings from the year before. This year in the United States that day fell on April 12th. In Germany it was March 19th. In Switzerland it was February 24th. In Ontario? Equal Pay […] . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Equal Pay Day

The Progressive Economics Forum: Workers Link $15 Minimum Wage to Decent Work

Wednesday April 15th is a global day of action on a $15 minimum wage and decent work. Actions are happening across the U.S., and in BC, Ontario, and Nova Scotia.

Both in the US and in Canada, workers are making links between decent wages and other employment standards. The Ontario campaign is named $15 and . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Workers Link $15 Minimum Wage to Decent Work

The Progressive Economics Forum: Transforming Precarious Work

The Ontario government has launched a review of their Labour Relations Act and Employment Standards Act. The premise is that the workplace has changed, and Ontario labour law no longer does as much as it should to protect vulnerable workers.

The Workers’ Action Centre in Toronto took this opportunity to document the myriad ways that . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Transforming Precarious Work

The Progressive Economics Forum: Job Numbers Surprise

For the first time in a while, Statistics Canada gives us some good news on the job front. 74,000 net new jobs added in September, certainly nothing to sneeze at. Still, we would need to keep this pace up every month for the next year to close the employment gap left by the last recession.

. . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Job Numbers Surprise

The Progressive Economics Forum: Is Canada becoming a ‘part-time’ nation – the value of LMI

Most of the jobs added to the Canadian labour market in 2014 were part-time – prompting headlines such as “Experts fret Canada becoming a nation of part-time workers“.

Are we really a part-time nation? Well, 80% of workers in Canada are full-time, and a large majority of part-time workers choose to work part-time hours. So, . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Is Canada becoming a ‘part-time’ nation – the value of LMI

The Progressive Economics Forum: Labour market stagnant

Erin has already commented that the tiny silver lining of 26,000 net new jobs in May covers a net loss of full-time jobs. In fact, if you compare this May to May 2013, we see that all of the net job gain in the past 12 months is part-time work too.

To look at the . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Labour market stagnant

The Progressive Economics Forum: He-cession to She-precarious recovery?

As Armine has pointed out recently, women play a key role in economic recoveries: (She says it so well, I have to quote her directly:)

Every recession is a “he-cession”: men lose more jobs than women in a downturn because the first thing to slow is the production in goods-producing industries that are typically male-dominated . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: He-cession to She-precarious recovery?

The Progressive Economics Forum: A Part-Time, Do-It-Yourself Job Market

Statistics Canada reported that employment grew by 22,000 in November. But 20,000 of those new jobs were part-time. The proportion of all Canadian jobs that are part-time rose to an even 19%.

Broken down another way, 19,000 of the employment increase were people reporting themselves as self-employed. Canadian employers actually hired fewer than 3,000 additional . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: A Part-Time, Do-It-Yourself Job Market

The Progressive Economics Forum: Unemployment is higher than you think.

Every month, Statistics Canada comes out with the unemployment rate, and every month it gets a lot of attention. But the unemployment rate provides quite limited information about the actual health of the labour market.

The addition of two other pieces of information nearly doubles the unemployment rate: the proportion of the labour market employed . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Unemployment is higher than you think.

The Progressive Economics Forum: Part-Time Growth in a “Hamster Wheel” Job Market

Today, Statistics Canada reported that employment increased in August, although two-thirds of the additional jobs were part-time positions. The part-time rate rose to 19%, its highest level in more than a year.

Job growth has also been “part-time” in the sense that only a few months this year have seen meaningful employment gains. Over the . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Part-Time Growth in a “Hamster Wheel” Job Market

elementalpresent: ‘Hipster’ is not a real job. Neither is not having a job.

Last week, the CCPA released a report (authored by yours truly) about youth un- and underemployment in Canada. It showed that, while youth unemployment in Canada is not insubstantial – 14.1% in 2011, up from 12.9% in 2006 – it’s still “low” compared to other OECD countries. In Greece, for example, the rate was 44.4% . . . → Read More: elementalpresent: ‘Hipster’ is not a real job. Neither is not having a job.

The Progressive Economics Forum: Youth employment trends

As a follow-up to my last post, where I showed R7 – the unemployment rate that includes involuntary part-time, I was curious what the longer term trend was regarding youth and part-time employment.

As you can see in the graph below, the proportion of 20-24 year olds engaged in full-time work has steadily fallen since . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Youth employment trends

elementalpresent: How to Eliminate Tuition Fees (and do it right)

Quebec student group CLASSE has come forward with an offer of what it would take to end their almost four-month strike: the elimination of tuition fees by 2016. The plan is based on taxing banks, starting at 0.14 per cent per cent this year, and rising to 0.7 per cent over the next four. According . . . → Read More: elementalpresent: How to Eliminate Tuition Fees (and do it right)

The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada’s Self-Imposed Crisis in Post-Secondary Education

On June 7, I gave a keynote address to the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees Education Sector Conference. My PowerPoint presentation (with full references) can be found at this link.

Points I raised in the address include the following:

-Canada’s economy has been growing quite steadily over the past three decades, even when one adjusts . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada’s Self-Imposed Crisis in Post-Secondary Education

elementalpresent: Why work?

I was raised up believing I was somehow unique Like a snowflake distinct among snowflakes, unique in each way you can see And now after some thinking, I’d say I’d rather be A functioning cog in some great machinery serving something beyond me But I don’t, I don’t know what that will be I’ll get . . . → Read More: elementalpresent: Why work?

The Progressive Economics Forum: Discussing Quebec Student Protests on Talk Radio

Last Friday, I blogged here about the Quebec student protests. Subsequently, I was invited to appear on 580 CFRA News Talk Radio, with hosts Rob Snow and Lowell Green.

I should note that Mr. Green is the author of several books, including:

-How the Granola Crunching, Tree Hugging Thug Huggers are Wrecking our Country;

–Mayday . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Discussing Quebec Student Protests on Talk Radio