Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Kevin Connor reports that the more Ontario voters are exposed to the realities of public-private partnerships, the more they’re turning against the idea – with a quarter or less of respondents seeing any upside to handing public services over to businesses. Tony Keller writes that Canada’s history of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Neil Irwin examines one of the key ideas underlying the U.S. Democrats’ economic plans, being that workers need to have meaningful choices rather than being trapped by a limited and slanted set of available employers and work structures: Labor market monopsony is the idea that when there isn’t ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Graham Lowe and Frank Graves examine the state of Canada’s labour market, and find a strong desire among workers for an activist government to ensure improved pay equality and social supports. Oxfam reaches similar conclusions in studying workers and employers in Scotland. And Emma Teitel reports on ...

Accidental Deliberations: On available alternatives

Shorter Murray Mandryk: A poll which shows the NDP picking up support from dissatisfied Saskatchewan Party voters proves my point that the NDP can’t possibly pick up support from dissatisfied Saskatchewan Party voters.

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the connection between unionization and secure employment income – and the importance of encouraging the former if people otherwise face no real hope of achieving the latter. For further reading…– Again, Jake Rosenfeld, Patrick Denice and Jennifer Laird’s Economic Policy Institute study showing how unionization boosts non-union pay is here.– The Canadian Payroll ...

Accidental Deliberations: Juxtaposition

Shorter Tim Naumetz on the NDP’s consistent stance opposing Bill C-51, a position supported by 17% of respondents in a recent poll (with plenty more undecided): Boy, it’s weird that a political party would take stand on a policy issue despite the public being less than fully on board at the moment. Shorter Tim Naumetz ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Ed Finn discusses how to fight for needed alternatives to neoliberalism in the face of seemingly daunting odds and structural barriers. – Noah Smith points out how most economic analysis omits important social factors which ultimately matter far more to people than marginal GDP. And as a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ed Broadbent, Michal Hay and Emilie Nicolas theorize that Canada’s left is on the rise. Matt Karp takes a look at the policy preferences of younger American voters, including a strong willingness to fund far better social programs than are currently available. And N+1 responds to the rise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jason Hinkel writes that for as much attention as global inequality has received in recent years, it may be significantly more of a problem than we’ve previously assumed – and getting worse as time goes by: It doesn’t matter how you slice it; global inequality is getting ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on the leadership choices facing the federal and provincial NDP – and why neither should be too quick to assume that changing leaders will necessarily help to rebuild after election disappointments. For further reading…– I’ve dealt with the background to the federal party’s decision on Mulcair in a previous series of posts ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Sarah Anderson, Marc Bayard, John Cavanagh, Chuck Collins, Josh Hoxie and Sam Pizzigati offer an outline as to how to fight back against growing inequality: § We need to see inequality as a deep systemic problem. Piecemeal interventions have not helped slow or reverse the pace of wealth ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Robert Atkinson discusses the need for corporate tax policy to encourage economic development rather than profit-taking and share inflation. And Jim Hightower notes that it’s an anti-democratic corporate mindset that led to the poisoning of Flint. – Stephen Tapp offers some noteworthy ideas to ensure the public can ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Krugman writes that we’re far closer to a major energy transformation than many people realize – but that public policy decisions in the next few years may make all the difference in determining whether it materializes: According to a recent report by the investment firm Lazard, the ...

Accidental Deliberations: On relativity

Since we’re seeing another wave of hysteria about Tom Mulcair’s support in the general public as the NDP’s convention approaches, let’s check in with the main poll being cited for the thesis that there’s some imminent issue with his popular support. And in particular, let’s take a look at the question which considers leaders in ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how people generally have a better idea about the facts underlying our political choices than they suggest in response to an ordinary poll – and how we can make better decisions by looking to the root causes of that distinction. For further reading…– The studies referred to in the article are here (pdf) ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Paul Krugman discusses the connection between concentrated wealth and extreme anti-social political behaviour: Wealth can be bad for your soul. That’s not just a hoary piece of folk wisdom; it’s a conclusion from serious social science, confirmed by statistical analysis and experiment. The affluent are, on average, less ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Jacqueline Davidson offers a personal account of the experience of living in poverty, including the need to rely on charity to make up for constantly-unmet needs. And Alana Semuels discusses how single mothers in particular have no choice but to rely on social connections to make up ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Upstream offers a summary of the Canadian Institute for Health Information’s latest report, with particular emphasis on growing inequality in health metrics due to social factors despite increased funding into the the health care system. – Jamie Golombek is the latest to highlight how most Canadians – including ...

Accidental Deliberations: On value judgments

Apparently the Conservative exercise in spin isn’t about to end anytime soon just because Stephen Harper has lost power. Here’s Ken Boessenkool as a representative spokesflack on the Cons’ time in office: The Conservative party has a remarkable opportunity to prepare to regain power in the wake of our equally remarkable nine-year run in government. ...

Accidental Deliberations: On accurate readings

Paul Barber offers a rundown of the problems with an overreliance on polls, while Heather Libby goes further and suggests that we ignore national polls altogether. But I’ll follow up on the argument I’ve made before that rather than taking any concerns about poll data as a basis for throwing polling out the window altogether, ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, summarizing these posts as to how the opposition parties can set the stage for a minority Parliament by telling us what they’ll do on the first set of confidence votes – and how we can make better voting choices if they fail to do so. For further reading…– Having mentioned the expected outcome of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Exchange highlights the World Economic Forum’s observation that countries can do far more to combat inequality. And Angus Reid finds that Canadian voters are far more receptive to Tom Mulcair’s progressive economic plan than to more of the same from either of the major competing leaders. – Meanwhile, ...

Accidental Deliberations: On historical connections

Needless to say, we have ample reason to laugh at Justin Trudeau’s attempt to cast himself as bearing any similarity to Tommy Douglas when it comes to social justice and economic management. But it may not be long before one significant link develops between the two. Based on a quick scan, the 1962 federal election ...

Accidental Deliberations: Juxtaposition

On the one hand, there’s what Canadian voters actually want… (N)early 60 per cent of respondents support the idea of two or more parties forming a coalition government, if no party gains a majority of seats in October’s election. And this: By a margin of almost two-to-one, the voters of today would send Mr. Harper ...

Accidental Deliberations: On anticipated departures

With Canada’s federal election still a month and a half away, it’s obviously too early to be concluding that it will end the career of any of our current political leaders. (And we should keep that in mind given that far too much commentary treats the question of whether leaders will hold onto their jobs ...