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The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Unopen Government #nlpoli

The idea of open data has been around for a while.

In government, it means that government would make information like census data,  statistics,  licensing information easily and freely available for anyone to use, free of charge and any restrictions. It’s a way of sparking creativity, crowd-sourcing new information, and basically spending less time and . . . → Read More: The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Unopen Government #nlpoli

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the City of Regina’s actual treatment of key information runs contrary to its stated commitment to open government.For further reading…- Natascia Lypny’s report on the City’s delays and denials of access to information about Regina’s new… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.- Robert Frank comments on the connection between recognizing the luck and social support which lead to one’s own success, and being willing to fund a state which will ensure opportunities for everybody:I’ve seen e… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.- John Ross makes the case for a focus on the social determinants of health in all kinds of public policy-making:Many studies show that if you work long hours in low-paying jobs and live paycheque to paycheque, co… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On closed-door decisions

Memo to Don Lenihan:

It’s well and good to point to past backroom policy debacles such as utterly unwanted Crown corporation giveaways as examples of a complete lack of public engagement.

But before lauding Kathleen Wynne as the face of open government, might it be worth noting that she’s doing the exact same thing on . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On closed-door decisions

Cowichan Conversations: Brent Beach is Running To Become Shawnigan’s CVRD Director

Brent for Area B OCP – Community Vision Incorporation Study Citizen Involvement Open Government Brent at the Focus News Updates Taxes Who Am I?

My name is Brent Beach.

I first visited Shawnigan Lake in 1978. Having lived in Manitoba and Ontario, Shawnigan Lake was a dream world.

I moved to Victoria in 1983.

. . . → Read More: Cowichan Conversations: Brent Beach is Running To Become Shawnigan’s CVRD Director

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Edward Robinson laments the willingness of European centre-left parties to abandon any attempt to argue against austerity even when the evidence shows that’s the right position to take: Centre-left parties in Europe appear to have completely lost the argument for pragmatic fiscal policy, much in the way . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Tim Harper and the Star’s editorial board each offer up some hope that 2014 will be a more productive year in politics than 2013 was. And Nora Loreto offers a suggestion as to how to make that happen: Young workers, like all workers, need the labour movement to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Thomas Walkom writes that the Harper Cons’ much-hyped economic record in fact offers ample reason to demand a change in government: The Conservatives insist that the economy is their strong suit. And for a while it was. In 2011, voters bought Harper’s pitch.

But voter patience can last . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: #mtlqc13 Priority Resolution – Governance

One of the most obvious sources of cynicism in politics – which the NDP should be seeking to combat at every turn – is the presence of issues where opposition promises turn into government inaction or even abuse. And the Cons have sadly offered a case in point when it comes to accountability and transparency.

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: #mtlqc13 Priority Resolution – Governance

Politics, Re-Spun: Is Christy Clark Lying to Us About the LNG Tax Windfall?

I don’t know. Do you? No.

And, it seems, we won’t be permitted to determine if the BC Liberal government is lying to us about their future vision of rolling in billions in fresh new LNG tax money because the supporting reports won’t be released. So much for accountability and open government.

We also won’t . . . → Read More: Politics, Re-Spun: Is Christy Clark Lying to Us About the LNG Tax Windfall?

The Sixth Estate: Parliamentary Secrecy Continues: House Committees Spent 55% of Time in Camera in September

MPs are back at work and, under the Harper regime, that means that they are once again spending a considerable portion of their “public” time actually meeting behind closed doors, away from the sinister prying eyes of the public and of journalists. The CBC’s venerable Kady drew attention to this last week in the context . . . → Read More: The Sixth Estate: Parliamentary Secrecy Continues: House Committees Spent 55% of Time in Camera in September

calgaryliberal.com: Ms. Redford’s Fudget-Budget: Not Open, Not Transparent, and Definitely Not What She Promised

Ms. Redford’s expectation that the price of oil would stay high (we’re currently hitting a nine-month low for oil), her spending promises be fulfilled, and that a PC government would be a stable choice for Albertans, has fallen flat. She ran on the regular non-Conservative spending sprees — even where doctors and front line workers . . . → Read More: calgaryliberal.com: Ms. Redford’s Fudget-Budget: Not Open, Not Transparent, and Definitely Not What She Promised

The Sixth Estate: Open Government Update: Parliamentary Committees Spent 47% of Meeting Time in Secret in June

After an appallingly inaccurate CP report on Parliamentary secrecy a couple of montsh ago, Sixth Estate began tracking the amount of time that Parliamentary committees spend in camera, meaning in secret, under the Harper regime. The Open Government Project page shows that Harper’s Parliament allows committees to meet in secret significantly more often than they . . . → Read More: The Sixth Estate: Open Government Update: Parliamentary Committees Spent 47% of Meeting Time in Secret in June

Alex's Blog: Taking Back Our Democracy: Bridging the Generational Divide

These are tough days for Canada’s parliamentary democracy. Having endured years of steady erosion, it is now under frontal attack. Journalists and public leaders, across the political spectrum, have begun to document the injuries. We are seeing stirrings of outrage. But this assault on our democracy could not be happening without some complicity or . . . → Read More: Alex’s Blog: Taking Back Our Democracy: Bridging the Generational Divide

Left Over: Bob Paulson, Emperor Steve’s New Minion

Top cop concerned with Mounties airing problems in public RCMP Commissioner says bill will help end ‘outrageous’ behaviour

“1984, knocking at your door…” What is it about the CRAPs that their supporters like? Must be the fact that they are impressive sweepers…of bad news, directly under the rug, never to see the light of day.. . . . → Read More: Left Over: Bob Paulson, Emperor Steve’s New Minion

The Sixth Estate: Further Updates to Open Government Project: Yes, Harper Parliament is More Secretive than Predecessors

A couple weeks after CP spread a nasty and false rumour that Chretien and Martin ran Parliament far more secretively than Stephen Harper does, electronic versions of its hit piece have become rare as hen’s teeth. Some are still out there, but CP’s retraction, prompted by fact-checking by exactly two journalists across the dozens of . . . → Read More: The Sixth Estate: Further Updates to Open Government Project: Yes, Harper Parliament is More Secretive than Predecessors

The Sixth Estate: Secrecy at Public Accounts Committee Rises from 21.8% under Liberals to 32.1% Under Conservatives

My study of Parliamentary secrecy, rejuvenated by CP’s bogus numbers claiming to prove that the Martin majority was much more secretive than the Harper majority, continues. Unlike the House as a whole, committees regularly go in camera, meaning no observers may be present, and no detailed records of testimony or debates are published. As I . . . → Read More: The Sixth Estate: Secrecy at Public Accounts Committee Rises from 21.8% under Liberals to 32.1% Under Conservatives

The Sixth Estate: “Data” on Parliamentary Secrecy from Martin Years Includes Senate Committees, Bogus Committee

As promised, I am conducting a fact-checking inquiry into the recent news report alleging, contrary to routine media reports of growing secrecy under the Harper government, that actually Martin’s brief majority in 2004 was far more secretive, averaging 116 minutes a day of hidden in camera committee meetings.

I am now in a position to . . . → Read More: The Sixth Estate: “Data” on Parliamentary Secrecy from Martin Years Includes Senate Committees, Bogus Committee

The Sixth Estate: Sixth Estate Dissents From CP Report on Parliamentary Secrecy

As they say, there are three kinds of statistics — and two of them are lies.

On Sunday, a strange and surprising report began making the rounds of the Canadian professional media thanks to Canadian Press: a claim that, contrary to the protests of the Official Opposition, the Harper regime is actually less secretive than . . . → Read More: The Sixth Estate: Sixth Estate Dissents From CP Report on Parliamentary Secrecy

eaves.ca: Open Data Movement is a Joke?

Yesterday, Tom Slee wrote a blog post called “Why the ‘Open Data Movement’ is a Joke,” which – and I say this as a Canadian who understands the context in which Slee is writing – is filled with valid complaints about our government, but which I feel paints a flawed picture of the open data . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Open Data Movement is a Joke?

The Sixth Estate: More than 1 in 4 Harper Ministers Miss Proactive Disclosure Deadline

Under policy set by the Chretien government and supposedly faithfully followed by all departments and agencies under the Harper regime, every group within the Government of Canada must supply, every three months, a list of contracts over $10,000, a list of grants and contributions over $25,000, and a list of travel and hospitality expenses by . . . → Read More: The Sixth Estate: More than 1 in 4 Harper Ministers Miss Proactive Disclosure Deadline

eaves.ca: Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government: A Review

The other day the Canadian Government published its Action Plan on Open Government, a high level document that both lays out the Government’s goals on this file as well as fulfill its pledge to create tangible goals as part of its participation in next week’s Open Government Partnership 2012 annual meeting in Brazil.

So what . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government: A Review

eaves.ca: Calculating the Value of Canada’s Open Data Portal: A Mini-Case Study

Okay, let’s geek out on some open data portal stats from data.gc.ca. I’ve got three parts to this review: First, an assessment on how to assess the value of data.gc.ca. Second, a look at what are the most downloaded data sets. And third, some interesting data about who is visiting the portal.

Before we dive . . . → Read More: eaves.ca: Calculating the Value of Canada’s Open Data Portal: A Mini-Case Study

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the opportunities and limitations associated with the City of Regina’s new open data portal.

For further reading, see David Eaves generally, but particularly his analysis of data licensing (where the City looks to have met rather well).