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Babel-on-the-Bay: The grandstanding of Patrick Brown.

People who prefer to grandstand in politics can be a pain in the ass. There are times when a politician should to take a stand on an issue but that is when you can reason and suggest alternatives to help solve the problem. Our Leader of Her Majesty’s Opposition in Ontario does not believe in . . . → Read More: Babel-on-the-Bay: The grandstanding of Patrick Brown.

Wise Law Blog: Social Media in Family Law Matters

BY SIMRAN BAKSHI and RACHEL SPENCE

How much is it worth to bash your spouse on social media? These days, the cost could be more than you might think.Canadian Courts have seen the use of social media as evidence in family law proceedings increase dramatically in the past few years. Westhaver v. Howard, 2007 NSSC 357, . . . → Read More: Wise Law Blog: Social Media in Family Law Matters

Joe Fantauzzi: THE PROBLEMS OF CARDING: Excising the Discriminatory Police Street Check Process

Over at Academia.edu, I have posted an updated public policy analysis of the police practice of carding, also known as “street checks” that I did as part of my Master’s course load. The full paper can be found HERE. But here is the Executive Summary: This policy analysis paper examines three options to deal with . . . → Read More: Joe Fantauzzi: THE PROBLEMS OF CARDING: Excising the Discriminatory Police Street Check Process

Blunt Objects Blog: Trumpism in Canada, Part 1: Ontario

You might be shocked to hear this, but Donald J. Trump is not popular politically in Canada.

In fact, according to any poll he isn’t popular almost anywhere, including within the country he’ll now lead. Yet the man convincingly won an election through the Electoral College – the question is, of course, how?

The short . . . → Read More: Blunt Objects Blog: Trumpism in Canada, Part 1: Ontario

Babel-on-the-Bay: The rise of the exurbanites.

Trump reached for it in America and the exurbanites coalesced behind him. With these new rural voters who have fled the cities and in sync with the traditional American Gothic farmers, he dominated state after state. These people resent and fear our conglomerate cities, the liberal attitudes they promote and the crush of the ethnic . . . → Read More: Babel-on-the-Bay: The rise of the exurbanites.

The Progressive Economics Forum: Do Calgary and Edmonton need more power and resources?

Over at the web site of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, I’ve written a blog post titled “Do Calgary and Edmonton need more power and resources?” The blog post comes as the Government of Alberta considers the possibility of, well, giving more power and sources to both Calgary and Edmonton.

Points raised in the blog post . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Do Calgary and Edmonton need more power and resources?

Alberta Politics: The question must be asked: Was Brad Wall’s party being paid to undermine Alberta’s NDP?

PHOTOS: Alberta Premier Rachel Notley and Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall, not looking quite like himself, were still smiling and standing side by side at the start of the July 2015 premiers’ meeting in St. John’s. A week later? Now? Not so much. Below: Mr. Wall as we’ve come to know him, interfering Alberta premier William . . . → Read More: Alberta Politics: The question must be asked: Was Brad Wall’s party being paid to undermine Alberta’s NDP?

Babel-on-the-Bay: The drip torture by the Wynne government.

Maybe they think they are too classy for simple water torture or boarding. The Ontario Liberals are inflicting an alcohol torture on the poor consumer. First, you have to find out which super grocery stores have just beer and cider or wine and beer or just a kiosk for plonk. There are now 67 out . . . → Read More: Babel-on-the-Bay: The drip torture by the Wynne government.

Babel-on-the-Bay: The losers are lurking.

It must be Halloween in the air. Losers from the last federal election are gathering. There will be a provincial election in 2018 and the Conservative losers from the last federal election are jockeying for nominations in provincial electoral districts.

The first of these Conservative nominations was for the upcoming bye-election in Niagara West-Glanbrook and . . . → Read More: Babel-on-the-Bay: The losers are lurking.

Scott's DiaTribes: Municipal Councils opposed to Ranked Ballot on “too complicated” argument insult voters intelligence

The province of Ontario recently gave municipal and city councils the ability to reform their voting system. Thanks to Bill 181, municipalities now have the option of using ranked ballot for their local elections. It shouldn’t come as a total surprise that there has been resistance to change. A lot of status quo politicians out . . . → Read More: Scott's DiaTribes: Municipal Councils opposed to Ranked Ballot on “too complicated” argument insult voters intelligence

Joe Fantauzzi: Columbus is no hero of mine

Italian-North Americans — especially those of us with roots in the Mezzogiorno (and I include the Ciociaria and Abbruzzo here) — don’t need a Genoese genocidal rapist as our hero. It’s time to eliminate Columbus Day. It’s time for #IndigenousPeoplesDay   Some good reading and watching: ‘All Indians Are Dead?’ At Least That’s What Most . . . → Read More: Joe Fantauzzi: Columbus is no hero of mine

The Progressive Economics Forum: Guaranteed Annual Income

Over at the web site of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, I’ve written a blog post titled “Ten things to know about Canada’s guaranteed annual income debate.”

Points raised in the blog post include the following:

-There are people and groups on both the left and right of the political spectrum who favour a Guaranteed Annual . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Guaranteed Annual Income

Babel-on-the-Bay: Protecting public assets.

What government, municipal, provincial or federal, has not looked longingly to selling off public companies as a fast way to some ready cash? The government can promise to do nothing but good with the money. The only problem is that once the asset is gone, there is no more revenue from it beyond its corporate . . . → Read More: Babel-on-the-Bay: Protecting public assets.

Babel-on-the-Bay: How far Bill Davis’ party has fallen.

We can admit it now but could not when he was Premier of Ontario, Bill Davis is a decent guy. As much as he likes to pose as the bastion of the right, Bill has always liked people and is a caring, compassionate person. If he was much younger and leader of Ontario’s Progressive Conservatives […] . . . → Read More: Babel-on-the-Bay: How far Bill Davis’ party has fallen.

Carbon49 – Sustainability for Canadian businesses: Canadians Prefer Businesses with Green Vehicles

Should your company cars and long distance fleets go green? 90% of Canadians believe businesses should reduce transportation related emissions and 82% feel having an environmentally friendly fleet is an important factor when choosing vendors. I look at the findings to see if turning your fleet green may make business sense. . . . → Read More: Carbon49 – Sustainability for Canadian businesses: Canadians Prefer Businesses with Green Vehicles

Babel-on-the-Bay: Winning ways for Wynne.

Ontario’s news media might be a little premature in wringing their hands and writing eulogies for Ontario’s Liberal government. With something like 30 per cent of the voters turning out for the September 1 by-election, the portent is nothing more than the local Liberals need to work a bit harder. But that also applies to […] . . . → Read More: Babel-on-the-Bay: Winning ways for Wynne.

Babel-on-the-Bay: Patrick Brown: Manipulator.

Why was Conservative Leader Patrick Brown getting all the attention in the final week before yesterday’s provincial by-election? It was while his party’s candidate in the Scarborough—Rouge River was convincing ethnic Chinese in the high newcomer ratio electoral district that their concerns about their children’s sex education would be addressed. We did tell you that […] . . . → Read More: Babel-on-the-Bay: Patrick Brown: Manipulator.

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- Jim Hightower argues that there’s no reason the U.S. can’t develop an economic model which leads to shared prosperity – and the ideas are no less relevant in Canada:Take On Wall Street is both the name and th… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Jim Hightower argues that there’s no reason the U.S. can’t develop an economic model which leads to shared prosperity – and the ideas are no less relevant in Canada:

Take On Wall Street is both the name and the feisty attitude of a nationwide campaign that a coalition of grassroots groups has launched to do just that: take on Wall Street. The coalition, spearheaded by the Communication Workers of America, points out there is nothing natural or sacred about today’s money-grabbing financial complex. Far from sacrosanct, the system of finance that now rules over us has been designed by and for Wall Street speculators, money managers and big bank flimflammers. So, big surprise, rather than serving our common good, the system is corrupt, routinely serving their uncommon greed at everyone else’s expense.

The coalition’s structural reforms include:
1. Getting the corrupting cash of corporations and the superrich out of politics with an overturning of Citizens United v. FEC and providing a public system for financing America’s elections.

2. Stopping “too big to fail” banks from subsidizing their high-risk speculative gambling with the deposits of  ordinary customers. Make them choose to be a consumer bank or a casino, but not both.

3. Institute a tiny “Robin Hood tax” on Wall Street speculators to discourage their computerized gaming of the system, while also generating hundreds of billions of tax dollars to invest in America’s real economy.

4. Restore low-cost, convenient “postal banking” in our post offices to serve millions of Americans who’re now at the mercy of predatory payday lenders and check-cashing chains.

– Juliette Garside reports on the EU’s efforts to get the U.S. to agree to basic reporting to rein in offshore tax evasion. And Heather Long points out Joseph Stiglitz’ criticisms of the Trans-Pacific Partnership as enriching corporations at the expense of citizens.

– Amy Maxmen notes that a non-profit system can develop new drugs far more affordably than the current corporate model – and without creating the expectation of windfall profits that currently underlies the pharmaceutical industry.

– Jordan Press offers a preview of a federal strategy for homeless veterans featuring rental subsidies and the building of targeted housing units – which leads only to the question of why the same plan wouldn’t be applied to address homelessness generally.

– Alan Shanoff comments on the many holes in Ontario’s employment standards (which are generally matched elsewhere as well).

– Finally, Dougald Lamont highlights the many ways in which the Fraser Institute’s anti-tax spin misleads the media about how citizens relate to Canadian governments.

[Edit: fixed wording.] . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Owen Jones discusses the UK’s experience with privatized rail as yet another example of how vital services become more costly and worse-run when put in corporate hands.- Sean McElwee highlights still more resea… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Owen Jones discusses the UK’s experience with privatized rail as yet another example of how vital services become more costly and worse-run when put in corporate hands.- Sean McElwee highlights still more resea… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Babel-on-the-Bay: Mr. Brown is no chess champ and no leader.

There is a big difference between a manipulator and a planner. Mr. Brown, the current leader of the Ontario Conservative Party, is a manipulator. He uses the system to his advantage. Maybe he does not play chess as that is a challenge that requires you to think ahead of your moves. Watching Patrick Brown in […] . . . → Read More: Babel-on-the-Bay: Mr. Brown is no chess champ and no leader.

Babel-on-the-Bay: What’s up with Wynne?

It is certainly easy to forget about Kathleen Wynne’s Ontario Liberals during such a beautiful summer. They hardly do anything worthwhile the rest of the year but then they take the summer off and do less. The only member of the Liberal cabinet who has been putting in some hours has been Health Minister Erik […] . . . → Read More: Babel-on-the-Bay: What’s up with Wynne?

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Melisa Foster points out why millennials should be strongly interested in a national pharmacare program:Today, young Canadians are searching for jobs in an economy with high levels of precarious employment, unemploym… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

PostArctica: Walk #10

“Everywhere is walking distance if you have the time.” – Steven Wright Started off at Sherbrooke Metro. The view south. The view north. Apartment building on Rigaud. Mural on building […] . . . → Read More: PostArctica: Walk #10