Categories

A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

Politics and its Discontents: Our Post-Privacy Era

Have you ever found yourself, whether intentionally or by accident, on a webpage discussing STDs? Or how about a porn site? Perhaps you are interested in the online recruiting methodology ISIS? How about the latest research on the use of hallucinogenics to treat alcoholism or PTSD? Whatever you intent might have been, those searches, . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: Our Post-Privacy Era

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.- Kaylie Tiessen offers some important lessons from Ontario’s child poverty strategy – with the most important one being the importance of following through. And Christian Ledwell encourages Prince Edward Isl… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Politics and its Discontents: Sometimes, All We Can Do Is Bear Witness

What is the truth about Don Dunphy? I don’t know. But his story is surely worth sharing, given the terrible abuses of police authority that have been so much in the news these past several years. At the very least, a full and open investigation is warranted here:

Recommend this Post . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: Sometimes, All We Can Do Is Bear Witness

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Noah Smith weighs in on the effect of cash transfers in improving all aspects of life for people living in poverty. But Angus Deaton recognizes that individual income will only go so far if it isn’t matched by the development of effective government. 

– Maude Barlow . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

OpenMedia.ca: The Varsity: Why Bill C-51 (and your privacy) matter

Here’s why our privacy is so important to us.  If you value yours, keep speaking up to repeal C-51 at KillC51.ca

Article by Kaitlyn Simpson for The Varsity

The year is 2011: Edward Snowden has just come forth with a shocking disclosure regarding the United States National Security Agency’s invasive and secretive practices. . . . → Read More: OpenMedia.ca: The Varsity: Why Bill C-51 (and your privacy) matter

OpenMedia.ca: New privacy report warns about rampant Canadian telecom surveillance

An open Internet is free from government surveillance. Using the Internet to spy on people degrades our freedom and weakens our democracy. Tell that to your Senators at StopC51.ca

Article by Emily Chung for CBC News

Canadian telecommunications providers have been handing over vast amounts of customer information to law enforcement and . . . → Read More: OpenMedia.ca: New privacy report warns about rampant Canadian telecom surveillance

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Ryan Meili reminds us of the harmful health impacts of inequality. And Susan Perry discusses the effect of inequality on health in the workplace in particular: The rise in income inequality over the past three decades or so is taking a major toll on the general health . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading.

– D.L. Tice writes that it’s becoming more and more difficult for the right to ignore the spread of income inequality – and the reality that only public policy, not faith in the market, can produce a more fair distribution of income. Which is particularly important in light of . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Politics and its Discontents: If You Value Your Privacy

Watch. Learn. Share freely.

Recommend this Post

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Hakan Bengtsson offers some useful discussion about the challenges facing Sweden’s social democratic system – as the same factors being used to prevent the development of a more equitable society in Canada and elsewhere are being cited as excuses to tear down the model many countries aspire to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Bill Curry reports on the Cons’ continued refusal to provide accurate information to the PBO – with the end result being that an office intended to provide a fully-informed, unbiased perspective in evaluating government action is now being forced to make Access to Information requests in an attempt . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Kathleen Geier makes the case for greater progressive activism at lower levels of government – and the point applies with equal force in Canada:

(T)hose of us who want to build a more progressive America would be well-advised to pay relatively less attention to presidential races and . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Polly Toynbee writes that there’s no magic involved in collecting fair tax rates from the rich – only a need for the political will to fund public priorities: Cutting the 50% top rate suggests no great enthusiasm for rigorous taxing. Last week’s ONS figures revealed gigantic avoidance of . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Canada’s federal privacy law actually prohibits our own federal government from conducting secret surveillance (so long as it’s actually followed) – as well as how little that law means if countries don’t recognize that privacy applies beyond their borders.

For further reading…– Michelle Shepard reported here on Canada’s history of surveillance activities.  . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Jason Fekete reports that the Harper Cons are taking the side of international tax evaders against other G8 leaders trying to implement an effective enforcement system. And CBC reports that the Canada Revenue Agency has repeatedly turned down the opportunity to access information about tax cheats based on . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive: VICTORY: Canadians Killed Harper’s Internet Surveillance Bill C-30

by Obert Madondo | The Canadian Progressive, Feb. 12, 2013: Prime Minister Stephen Harper‘s Internet surveillance Bill C-30 is dead. The demise of the deceptively christened Protecting Children From Internet Predators Act is a victory for the Internet. For Canadian democracy. For Canadians. Federal Justice Minister Rob Nicholson confirmed it yesterday when he announced that . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: VICTORY: Canadians Killed Harper’s Internet Surveillance Bill C-30

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your day.

– Kayle Hatt’s blog looks to be a must-read from here on in. And his post on what to draw from the latest polls is particularly worth a read: Every poll that has been released since Thomas Mulcair was elected leader of the NDP has showed the NDP on . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

This and that for a sunny Saturday.

– Paul Wells discusses the clash shaping up between the Cons and the NDP: Some 57 per cent of respondents said they’re dissatisfied with the Harper government, compared to 36 per cent who like it. Last month’s federal budget drew more unsatisfied reaction than satisfied, and respondents who . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Politics and its Discontents: Vic Toews In Hospital

This just in from The Star:

Public Safety Minister Vic Toews was rushed to hospital by ambulance Monday morning.

A spokesperson for the minister’s office, Mike Patton, told the Star the minister has been battling a seasonal flu for the past number of weeks, and was take to hospital for observation “as a precaution.”

Patton . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: Vic Toews In Hospital

Politics and its Discontents: Vic Has A Warning For All of Us

Our alleged Public Safety Minister, Vic Toews, issued the following warning today:

Online hacker group Anonymous a threat to us all

Maybe. Or perhaps it is a threat only to those who seem to have an unhealthy, intrusive, and/or pruient interest in our Internet lives.

Recommend this Post . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: Vic Has A Warning For All of Us

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week.

– In the surest sign yet that the Robocon scandal involved a calculated decision by political operatives rather than having anything to do with mere overzealous volunteers, the Star reports that call centre staff hired by the Cons to perform live calling actually tried to correct the false information . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

mark a rayner | scribblings, squibs & sundry monkey joys: Online surveillance satisfaction team

The best part of good customer service is anticipating problems and solving them BEFORE they happen. Alltop likes to watch.

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Thomas Walkom points out that the McGuinty Libs’ choice to emphasize austerity rather than stabilizing Ontario’s economy may lead down exactly the same destructive path travelled by Greece and other countries: (T)he crises in Spain, Portugal and Greece occurred because government spending cuts designed to remedy debt problems . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– The outrage against the Cons’ total online surveillance scheme continues, with Dan Leger, Mia Rabson and Michael Geist adding noteworthy comments to the mix.

– Meanwhile, the Star rightly criticizes the latest legislation to hand Con cabinet ministers the power to make major policy decisions by . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: A friendly reminder

Some people who should know better are suggesting that universal media condemnation (as opposed to public involvement on social media) should be seen as the main factor in getting the Cons to climb back down on arbitrary online surveillance. So let’s take a ride in the wayback machine.

It wasn’t long ago that the Cons . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: A friendly reminder