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Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Andrew Jackson discusses why attacks on Old Age Security – including the Fraser Institute’s calls for increased clawbacks – serve no useful purpose: The principled argument for not clawing back OAS benefits is that all seniors should be entitled to a bare-bones public pension as a basic building . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Autonomy For All: Conservative Pension Behavioural Utopianism

Conservatives like to portray themselves as hard-bitten “realists” who look objectively at the world as it really is and shake their heads at silly liberals with our rose coloured glasses.  Yet I often find conservatives pushing policy ideas that are based on Utopian standards of human behaviour.  This is where they make policies that will work only . . . → Read More: Autonomy For All: Conservative Pension Behavioural Utopianism

Accidental Deliberations: #skndpldr Roundup

Alongside yesterday’s news of Erin Weir’s withdrawal to support Ryan Meili in the Saskatchewan NDP leadership race (also discussed by Scott and Brian) came a few other noteworthy developments – not the least of which was the reaction of the other two leadership candidates (discussed here by Jason).

Meanwhile, Meili released a seniors policy incorporating . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: #skndpldr Roundup

Accidental Deliberations: On effective departures

Obviously Erin Weir’s decision to withdraw from the Saskatchewan NDP’s leadership race and endorse Ryan Meili looks to be one of the most important developments of the campaign. While there’s still a wide range of possible outcomes among the remaining candidates, the movement of any substantial portion of Weir’s support should nearly ensure that Meili . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On effective departures

CANADIAN PROGRESSIVE WORLD: NDP: Harper Created Worst Deficit in Canadian History (VIDEO)

Apparently, the Official Opposition will not allow Stephen Harper‘s appetite for character-assassinating attack ads and propaganda to go unchallenged. The NDP has responded to the Conservatives’ recent attack ad targeting its leader, Thomas Mulcair. The ad, dubbed “Stephen Harper’s Solutions,” focuses on the prime minister’s economic record. It lambasts the Conservative government’s recent draconian cuts . . . → Read More: CANADIAN PROGRESSIVE WORLD: NDP: Harper Created Worst Deficit in Canadian History (VIDEO)

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – May 7, 2012

Monday, May 7 saw another day largely dominated by debate on the Cons’ omnibus budget bill.

The Big Issue

Plenty of MPs rightly focused on the Cons’ move to combine so many disparate types of legislation into a single behemoth of a bill. Don Davies remembered his first instruction as an MP and wondered . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – May 7, 2012

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: May 2, 2012

A combination of the one-year anniversary of Canada’s 2011 federal election and a relatively short day in Parliament left little room for a lot of debate on Wednesday, May 2. But the day did see some serious questions raised about the Cons’ rush to pass their budget without debate.

The Big Issue

Before debate actually . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: May 2, 2012

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: April 30, 2012

Monday, April 30 featured discussion of two opposition motions dealing with the federal government’s responsibility to ensure the safety of Canadians. And on both fronts, the Cons went out of their way to disclaim any such role for our public servants.

The Big Issue

Jack Harris started off the safety theme with a motion . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: April 30, 2012

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 27, 2012

Friday, April 27 saw another day of relatively non-contentious debate on the main bill up for discussion in the House of Commons. But there was plenty of reason to question why the focus would be as narrow as it was.

The Big Issue

That main bill was the Cons’ elder abuse legislation, intended to add . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 27, 2012

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 26, 2012

Thursday, April 26 saw ample discussion of private members’ business – and if the Cons are now cracking down on such debate, the results of the day’s proceedings might give us some clues as to why.

The Big Issue

While it didn’t receive as much media attention as another issue which was debated for substantially . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 26, 2012

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– No, there was never any doubt that any statement which could possibly be interpreted as insufficiently jingoistic in favour of the oil industry was going to give rise to a backlash from the Cons’ oilpatch base. But it’s well worth noting that Thomas Mulcair has had little trouble . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 23, 2012

Monday, April 23 was the first day back in the House of Commons following the Easter break. And it featured some of the most lively and telling discussion we’ve seen yet on the Cons’ anti-refugee legislation as the second-reading debate reached its end.

The Big Issue

As part of the refugee bill debate, Craig Scott . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 23, 2012

Accidental Deliberations: On tectonic shifts

I haven’t spent much time discussing the spate of recent polls showing the NDP with a modest lead on the Cons, as those top-line results can easily enough be considered an expected consequence of a tired government trying to force through controversial legislation against a popular new leader. But CARP’s latest member polling demands some . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On tectonic shifts

Driving The Porcelain Bus: Conservative Support Among Older Canadians Plummets. NDP Leads Now By A Wide Margin

CARP, (Canadian Association of Retired Persons), has released their latest poll regarding federal politics. For the first time in years, a party other than the Conservatives leads. The NDP now has an 8 point lead over the Conservatives. This poll definitely spells trouble for the Conservatives as their core support is from older Canadians. . . . → Read More: Driving The Porcelain Bus: Conservative Support Among Older Canadians Plummets. NDP Leads Now By A Wide Margin

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 3, 2012

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 saw the final day of debate at second reading of the Cons’ budget – and once again featured plenty of work by Peter Julian to introduce the types of perspectives the Cons would never tolerate if they could avoid it.

The Big Issue

Once again, Julian focused largely on bringing forward . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 3, 2012

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 2, 2012

Monday, April 2 saw the second day of Peter Julian’s extended budget speech. And perhaps the point most worth noting is how many Canadians outside of Parliament took the opportunity have their voices heard in the budget debate.

The Big Issue

So let’s focus this review on some of the input Julian received from across . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 2, 2012

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – March 29, 2012

There’s been much ado about the NDP’s position on trade agreements based on the Cons’ recent publicly-funded cheerleading for free trade at any price. But for anybody looking for the NDP’s actual view on trade, the House of Commons debates from March 29 offer a rather thorough indication.

The Big Issue

That’s thanks to a . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – March 29, 2012

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: March 26, 2012

Having taken a bit of a hiatus during and after the NDP’s leadership campaign, I’ll resume looking back at what’s happened in the House of Commons starting with the election of Thomas Mulcair. (I’ll plan to return to the previous sitting later on.)

Monday, March 26 saw Mulcair’s introduction as the new Leader of the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: March 26, 2012

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– In an excerpt from the Occupy Handbook, Paul Krugman and Robin Wells discuss how a right-wing obsession with exacerbating inequality led to the U.S.’ disastrous response to the 2008 crash: How did America become a nation that could not rise to the biggest economic challenge in three generations, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your weekend.

– Karl Nerenberg reported on Marc Mayrand’s Robocon testimony, featuring some much-needed discussion of what can be done to improve the Canada Elections Act to ensure fair elections rather than creating an incentive for electoral fraud: Mayrand fretted to the Committee that there are too many grey areas in . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

The Scott Ross: How Old Age Security Should Have Been Reformed

Instead of raising the retirement age and distressing seniors with low-income the government should have prevented wealthier Canadians from receiving Old Age Security; not only would this have been fairer but would have saved hundereds of millions of dollars more.

It makes sense that Canadians who are 65 and older and who make . . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: How Old Age Security Should Have Been Reformed

Sixth Communications’ Puppet, Angie Perischilli Quits Harper in Less Than a Year! But is he Being Hypocritical?

It is time to start calling the job of Communications director to ol’ Stevie “The wives of Henry the 8th”. Number 6 has just decided to get outta dodge, boys ‘n’ girls. Ol’ Angie is citing that long hours are starting to take a toll on his health. Let’s let him tell you about . . . . → Read More: Sixth Communications’ Puppet, Angie Perischilli Quits Harper in Less Than a Year! But is he Being Hypocritical?

Impolitical: Flaherty to seniors on #OAS

At the 1:30 mark and onwards, Flaherty gives an answer on his OAS age eligibility increase that is receiving some attention tonight. Two callers to the CPAC call-in show that ended at 10:00 p.m. EST remarked on Flaherty’s comment being rude. In tone, the way he emphasized the word “poor” may have drawn attention . . . → Read More: Impolitical: Flaherty to seniors on #OAS

Impolitical: The greatest show on earth

The big budget circus happens today. The big item, not to be lost sight of among all the other baubles that will be in the window, is in the headline here: “Conservative’s budget to reset retirement at age 67.” It’s a legacy choice by Stephen Harper, he will be the Prime Minister who raised . . . → Read More: Impolitical: The greatest show on earth

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your day.

– Carol Goar asked this weekend for a reasonable explanation as to how to allocate the pain in times of austerity. Not surprisingly, the McGuinty Libs came to the wrong answer – and the Harper Cons figure to do even worse. Meanwhile, Trish Hennessy comments on the power of . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links