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Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- The Broadbent Institute details Rhys Kesselman’s research on how the Cons’ expanded TFSAs are nothing but a giveaway to the wealthy. And Dean Beeby reports on their withholding of EI supplements from the families who most need them – paired with a complete lack of responsibility or contrition now that the problem has been discovered.

- Matt Saccaro discusses the widespread burnout among U.S. workers as huge increases in hours worked and productivity have done nothing to improve wages or living conditions over a period of decades. And Bill Tieleman slams (Read more…)

Babel-on-the-Bay: Is Mulcair peaking too soon?

Gosh, reading and listening to some political pundits, you would think that the coming federal election is already decided. It is all over but the shouting. It is one of those times when you wish you could take all those bets from the suckers. Frankly, this political apparatchik would not bet on New Democrat Leader Thomas Mulcair for prime minister.

It is certainly interesting to try to imagine Thomas Mulcair as prime minister but reality keeps getting in the way. Recently we wrote about the New Democrat leader that Canada needs a prime minister, not a prosecutor. And it is (Read more…)

A. Picazo: As Some Fight To “Take Alberta Back,” Others Work To Move It Forward

In 1954, when the U.S. Senate voted to censure Wisconsin Republican Joseph R. McCarthy, a man whose motivations were deemed “evil and unmatched in malice,” it closed the book on a particularly shameful chapter of American politics; One marked by relentless character assassinations, vicious demagoguery, and incessant partisan witch hunts. The extent to which the … Continue reading →

Driving The Porcelain Bus: NDP Now Has A Stable Lead And Is In Minority Government Territory

3 new polls were released today (Environics, Forum, Ipsos Reid), all confirming that the NDP has a stable and comfortable lead over the other parties. The Environics poll was in the field earlier and over a longer period (June 3-18), so it shows the older trend when the 3 parties were virtually tied. The other polls were more recently in the field, both ending June 23rd, and show a trend of the NDP being more in the lead. The table below shows the NDP rise from April to now (comparing the April average to the average (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: The abyss calling the kettle black

I’ve previously written that the Libs tend to be entirely incoherent when they can’t make any claim to votes by default – and that the lead in the polls earned by Tom Mulcair and the NDP raised a real possibility that would happen again.

But I’ll readily acknowledge that this goes far beyond my expectations.

Yes, for those scoring along at home: the federal leader of the Liberal Party is trying to score political points by noting another federal leader’s past association with a Liberal Party.

I suppose that’s one way to take “they’re all the same” messaging to a (Read more…)

Babel-on-the-Bay: The media feel the excitement.

Just about four months to the federal election and the news media can barely contain their excitement. Not since John Diefenbaker came out of the West like an avenging angel has an election been so fraught with possibilities. They have so many scenarios to write about. Change is in the air. Change is in all the Liberal and New Democrat speaking notes. The Conservatives just look worried.

And well they should. With two serious and challenging opposition parties poised to unseat them, the Conservatives should be questioning their strategy. They know that if the balance is maintained between the opposition (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Mark Anderson reports on the Change Readiness Index’ findings that the growing concentration and inequality of wealth is making it more and more difficult for countries to deal with foreseeable disasters. But Jon Queally points out that a concerted effort to quit abusing fossil fuels could do a world in making our world both more fair and more sustainable.

- James Galbraith suggests that the EU is guilty of gross malpractice in how it continues to treat Greece in the face of overwhelming public opposition to austerity. But as David Dayen points (Read more…)

Babel-on-the-Bay: NDP changing times, changing directions.

The CCF—the party of Tommy Douglas—represented the working man, the farmer and the socially conscious in an era of rapid growth and acquisition after the Second World War. We had little time for CCF concerns or socialism in those exciting years but the party was respected as a political conscience. It was only when the Canadian Labour Congress was formed that the combination of the CCF and labour became a reality.

The problem many of us young left wingers had against the labour involvement was that we did not see labour as having a social conscience. We saw labour involvement (Read more…)

Left Over: Corporate R & B: Get Over It…

Oilpatch could lose $100B without new pipelines, researchers warn Energy research firm suggests Western Canada producers won’t receive full value for oil exports

By Kyle Bakx, CBC News Posted: Jun 22, 2015 11:41 AM ET Last Updated: Jun 22, 2015 12:11 PM ET

 

 

Wah-wah-wah!!!! The whingeing of the rich and unscrupulous stirs only contempt in the rest of us..if they really were concerned about anything besides the grossness of their offshore accounts , they would spend more on remedying the damage done, finance refineries, and work toward sustainable energy..there is, believe it or not, money to be (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Pop quiz

Michael Den Tandt and John Geddes are convinced that Tom Mulcair’s speech to the Economic Club of Canada yesterday represents both a massive sea change in Canadian politics, and a response to the NDP’s newfound lead in the polls. So let’s offer a pop quiz to see if that theory holds up to scrutiny.

The following passages are from speeches Mulcair delivered:(a) to the Economic Club of Canada in April 2012;(b) to the Calgary Chamber of Commerce in February 2013; (c) to the Economic Club of Canada in January 2015; and(d) to the Economic (Read more…)

Bill Longstaff: Democracy wins one in Alberta

The new Alberta government has announced it will, as promised in its election platform, ban political funding by unions and corporations. Alberta will join the provinces of Manitoba, Quebec and Nova Scotia, as well as the City of Toronto and the federal government, with its ban.

The government has also promised a new legislative committee to review rules on elections and ethics and to

Accidental Deliberations: Flailbait

Susan Delacourt’s point that Canadian politics have seen a shift toward a permanent campaign is generally well taken. But it’s worth keeping in mind what it means when parties have the opportunity to plan for years in advance of a fixed election date: Political advertising, once only a feature of the official campaigns, now runs in between elections so that parties don’t have to waste precious time “introducing” their leader, including character and values, to the voting public. The between-election ads also give parties a chance to build a storyline around rivals, which will only be hinted at during the (Read more…)

Montreal Simon: Orange Surge: New Poll Shows the NDP Leading the Other Parties

As I've been saying for quite a while the winds of change are sweeping across this country, and the latest EKOS poll only confirms that.The NDP is still rising like a rocket.It's lead over the other parties continues to grow.And if an election was held tomorrow it would likely be in a position to form a minority government. Read more »

The Disaffected Lib: Well, That’s a Relief!

Israel has officially absolved itself of any wrongdoing in the murder of four Palestinian kids killed on a Gaza beach last summer.

The kids – they were children – had a soccer ball in play when an Israeli patrol boat opened fire on them with explosive shells. Unfortunately, for the Israelis, foreign journalists witnessed the slaughter. The New York Times’s Pulitzer prize-winning photographer Tyler Hicks, who witnessed the incident, though from a different angle to the Guardian, wrote in a blog at the time: “A small metal shack with no electricity or running water on a jetty in the (Read more…) . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Well, That’s a Relief!

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the Senate’s failure to provide any second thought on C-51 may serve as the ultimate signal that it has nothing useful to offer Canadians.

For further reading…- PressProgress’ look at the Senate’s sad history is well worth a read. The CBC reports on the Auditor General’s findings about the widespread abuse of public money. And Ian Austen offers a U.S. perspective on what comes next for the Senate.- Meanwhile, Karl Nerenberg explains why abolition is well within reach if anybody is willing to take a leadership role in pursuing it without reopening other (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Saving Canada $90,000,000/year not worth Wall’s “effort”

“The Senate is never going to run properly and it’s never going to be worth the money we put into it. So it should be scrapped.”

.@PremierBradWall Couldn't SK start the constitutional amendment process by proposing and adopting an amendment to abolish the Senate?

— Mike Burton (@Mikefromregina) June 9, 2015

Wall continues… “I’m not going to actively campaign for the Senate to be abolished.”

“even in light of this latest mess, then it’s not really worth the effort to try to change [the provinces’ {opposed to abolition}] minds.”

I don’t think Premier Wall is the (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- The Ottawa Citizen rightly slams Stephen Harper for failing to take climate change and energy policy seriously, while Mel Hurting points out Harper’s general economic failures in relying on dirty resource extraction rather than trying to build a cleaner and stronger economy. And PressProgress exposes the Cons’ laughable claim to have done anything at all to move toward renewable and sustainable energy.

- Peter Mazereeuw follows up on the work of Canadians for Tax Fairness in documenting tax evasion and calling for a crackdown on tax havens.

- David Dayen traces the history (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Unblocked

In response to the apparent return of Gilles Duceppe to federal politics, I’ll offer a quick rerun on the state of the Bloc Quebecois: Once the 1995 referendum was in the rear-view mirror, however, the Bloc recognized that it would need to stand for more than sovereignty alone. And so it developed a strategy of running hard against the government of the day (which was always its strongest Quebec opponent) and serving as an opposition on behalf of Quebec alone.

That strategy was highly effective at stoking frustration against sitting governments. But in the last few election cycles, it proved (Read more…)

Babel-on-the-Bay: Canadians are owed answers on the Senate.

Do you have a mental image of the three major party leaders cowering in their campaign bunkers this year afraid of questions on the Senate? They will all tell you that they are in favour of Senate reform and just what that reform might entail and how they will accomplish the task are the questions they are afraid to answer.

Stephen Harper had been stiff arming questions about the Senate since his record of 27 appointments to the chamber in 2009. Yet the other day in Kiev, he said that the Senate was an independent body. And if you believe (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: On damaging positions

I haven’t commented yet on the latest wave of federal polls primarily because I don’t see them radically changing my existing take on Canada’s impending election. But I’ll briefly address what looks like an overreaction to the latest numbers by Michael Harris.

By way of context, here’s my previous analysis as to how the Cons have done in attacking Trudeau: Justin Trudeau’s honeymoon as Liberal leader has come to an end, due to both the usual Conservative barrage of attack ads and his own missteps (most notably his ill-advised support for the Conservatives’ draconian terror bill).

But unlike his predecessors, (Read more…)

Babel-on-the-Bay: Justin Trudeau brought his perfect game.

When somebody bowls a perfect game, you have to admire it. In politics a perfect game is a rare event. You have to remember that in politics there are people out there who are lurking to ridicule, there are professional scoffers and there are the people paid to deride any and all suggestions from the opposition parties. And then you are treated worse by our news media.

All these people will attempt to ridicule, scoff, and laugh off Liberal suggestions but this time they will fail. They will have to fall back on commenting that the Liberal leader’s hair was (Read more…)

Driving The Porcelain Bus: A Sleeping Ontario Awakens

EKOS has released a 2nd poll that puts the NDP in the lead in the past couple of weeks. This solidifies things more, showing that it is not a fluke. (Actually, 8 recent polls have the NDP virtually tied with the Conservatives for the lead.) Probably the most significant number in the latest poll is the position of the NDP in Ontario. It has been pretty obvious that the NDP are going to hold onto their seats in Quebec. And, they have remained steadily competitive in BC. The key now to the election lies in vote-rich Ontario. For the (Read more…)

Montreal Simon: Breaking: New Poll Suggests The NDP is Now Leading the Other Parties.

For weeks Tom Mulcair and the NDP have been climbing steadily in the polls, and it was clear that if that trend continued it was only a matter of time before they passed the other parties.Well now they finally appear to have done it.According to the latest EKOS poll they are now in first place.Read more »

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Alberta Getting a Climate Change Plan?

If they enact what is known to be good policy, but the previous government was afraid to do, that’d be a start anyway.

I found it interesting that the newspaper had at least 1 line of comment from many minor party leaders, yet nothing from the PCs! They even had Greenpeace (instead of the Green Party of Alberta); what’s up with that?

Oh, and Hudema of Greenpeacee can’t steal the title of most polluting province from Saskatchewan without a fight, if he meant CO(2) produced per-capita.

Driving The Porcelain Bus: Excuse me Ipsos, do you know how to count? NDP doing quite well in the West, thank you.

Today, Ipsos came out with this headline:

Orange Crush is East, Not West: Federal Parties All Tied Up as Quebec Buoys NDP (30%) to Statistical Tie with Tories (31%), Grits (31%) Nationally 

Considering the actual poll numbers, especially when compared with the previous Ipsos polls, this is pretty misleading. It would imply that the NDP are not doing well or have not made any significant gains in the West.

When we look at the Ipsos numbers, we can see that the NDP have made significant gains, especially in Alberta in the West.

NDP support as shown in Ipsos polls (Read more…)