Prog Blog’s Flickr Photostream

Alberta Diary: NDP leadership debate was amicable, but it ignored the elephant in the progressive political room

Candidate Rachel Notley addresses the crowd of New Democrats Thursday night during the Alberta New Democratic Party’s final leadership debate in Edmonton. Candidates Rod Loyola, in the middle, and David Eggen, at left, are visible in the background. (Photo by Olav Rokne.) Below: Mr. Eggen, Mr. Loyola and 2012 federal NDP candidate Nathan Cullen, who advocated co-operation among progressive political parties.

Listening to the Alberta NDP’s final leadership debate Thursday night in Edmonton, one could almost imagine there was total unanimity about everything among the province’s New Democrats.

Indeed, there was complete unanimity among the three candidates – in (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Bruce Johnstone points out that one can’t justify Stephen Harper’s gross dereliction of duty in addressing greenhouse gas emissions based on any system of principles other than climate change denialism. And Tony Burman criticizes the Cons for burying their heads in the oil sands, while pointing out that we have plenty of work to do as citizens to replace them with leaders who actually contribute to the most important crisis facing humanity.

- Meanwhile, Jeremy Nuttall reports on the NDP’s work to stop damaging the planet in the name of unfettered resource extraction (Read more…)

Left Over: Mikey Doesn’t Like It…

 

Former B.C. premier Mike Harcourt quits NDP Harcourt let membership lapse over many issues including the party’s opposition to carbon tax

CBC News Posted: Apr 01, 2014 8:10 AM PT Last Updated: Apr 01, 2014 8:10 AM PT

 

Have to agree with Mike, in principle, although my membership lapsed years ago, and though I vote for the NDP in spite of the things they do that I don’t like (the alternatives are unthinkable) I am, like so many BCers, leaning towards the Greens..I can’t speak for other Provinces , but here on the West Coast, (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Harper’s Defence Minister Peter MacKay Dreams Of An “NDP Government” (VIDEO)

By: Obert Madondo | The Canadian Progressive: During Question Period in the House of Commons last week, NDP House Leader Nathan Cullen questioned Defence Minister Peter MacKay’s voting record on defence spending when the Conservatives…

The post Harper’s Defence Minister Peter MacKay Dreams Of An “NDP Government” (VIDEO) appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Sunday reading.

- Daniel Kaufman notes that the EU is on the verge of implementing new standards for transparency in oil extraction – while recognizing that big oil has fought the effort every step of the way in an effort to keep its activities secret. And Shaun Thomas discusses the no-knowledge zone set up around the Northern Gateway pipeline, as Nathan Cullen’s questions within the review process revealed that the federal government hadn’t so much as talked to First Nations or affected industries about the possible impact of an oil spill.

- But then, the Cons (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Sunday reading.

- Daniel Kaufman notes that the EU is on the verge of implementing new standards for transparency in oil extraction – while recognizing that big oil has fought the effort every step of the way in an effort to keep its activities secret. And Shaun Thomas discusses the no-knowledge zone set up around the Northern Gateway pipeline, as Nathan Cullen’s questions within the review process revealed that the federal government hadn’t so much as talked to First Nations or affected industries about the possible impact of an oil spill.

- But then, the Cons (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading.

- Stephen Maher points out why we shouldn’t believe the Cons for a second when they claim to care about cracking down on offshore tax evasion: The top level of Canadian society is a small club, and it includes politicians. The people who run the country are on excellent terms with the business people who squirrel away money in offshore tax havens.

Shea’s meaningless tough talk was prompted by a CBC report that said Saskatchewan lawyer Tony Merchant has $1.7 million in a Cook Islands bank. Merchant’s wife, Pana, was appointed to the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Paul Krugman discusses how a myopic focus on slashing taxes and services figures to cheat future generations out of desperately-needed social structure: You don’t have to be a civil engineer to realize that America needs more and better infrastructure, but the latest “report card” from the American Society of Civil Engineers — with its tally of deficient dams, bridges, and more, and its overall grade of D+ — still makes startling and depressing reading. And right now — with vast numbers of unemployed construction workers and vast amounts of cash sitting . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Progressive Proselytizing: How to vote in Trudeau’s coronation

Even before Justin Trudeau announced his candidacy to be the next Liberal leader, pundits were tripping over each other to declare the inevitability of his eventual success. With Marc Grarneau dropping out of the race following internal polling showing Trudeau lightyears ahead, the outcome truly is certain (read this is you still have your doubts). The question now is whether there remains any point in voting and, if so, who to vote for?

Is there still value in voting? I believe that there is still considerable value in voting in the leadership election and that the question of . . . → Read More: Progressive Proselytizing: How to vote in Trudeau’s coronation

Politics and its Discontents: Absolutely!

For me, one of the biggest offenses against logical thinking is absolutism, which essentially says there is only one right answer, that everything is black or white, with no gradations of gray. An example would be Vic Toews infamous assertion, when controversy erupted over his deeply flawed Internet surveillance bill, that those who opposed the legislation were siding with child pornographers. Another would be George Bush’s claim, after 9/11, that ‘You are either with us, or with the terrorists.’

Despite what the above examples might suggest, such thinking, sadly, is not the exclusive domain of those with

. . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: Absolutely!

CuriosityCat: Is Justin Trudeau trying to win the big enchilada on his own?

Justin Trudeau’s Big Enchilada?

This extract from The Vancouver Courier just about sums up the fate of electoral reform’s future right now:

Political cooperation isn’t a new concept, but University of B.C. political science professor Philip Resnick says it’s worth noting that in both the NDP and Liberal leadership campaigns, it has been the B.C. candidate who has advanced the concept of political cooperation. 

“Nathan Cullen in the NDP contest, Joyce Murray in the Liberal one. Add Elizabeth May to the mix and you have three,” he told me by email. 

“The idea would appeal to

. . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Is Justin Trudeau trying to win the big enchilada on his own?

CuriosityCat: Liberal leadership race: Liberal-Green pre-election ceasefire could prevent Harper majority in 2015

MP Elizabeth May

MP Joyce Murray was interviewed by the Canadian Press on the possibility of a pre-election electoral cooperation taking place in ridings that choose to do so before the 2015 election. Joan Bryden’s interesting article on the interview includes this comment on the extraordinary significance that such cooperation might have : On a national scale, however, it would be difficult for the Liberals and Greens, without the help of the NDP, to unseat the Conservative government. Based on the 2011 election results, a combined Liberal-Green vote could have theoretically defeated the Tories in just over a dozen ridings — not enough to defeat the governing party, although sufficient to reduce it to a minority.

MP Joyce Murray – Reformer

(Read more…) . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Liberal leadership race: Liberal-Green pre-election ceasefire could prevent Harper majority in 2015

centerandleft: Endorsement for Joyce Murray

Murray Can Lead Canada Forward | Chris Wattie, Reuters (via National Post)

For almost seven years, Stephen Harper has been the Prime Minister. Canadian progressives unite in their call that “we can do better” and yet, little is done to meet actions with words. In the New Democratic leadership race, I backed Nathan Cullen for his progressive partnership proposal. It was bold, it was controversial, but it represented real leadership. Mr. Cullen challenged New Democratic progressives, presenting them with an opportunity for real, meaningful change. Mr. Cullen inspired many people with his surprising success, but New Democrats decided to meet

. . . → Read More: centerandleft: Endorsement for Joyce Murray

Alberta Diary: Hockey-starved Canucks pray for brawl as Peter Van Loan channels Darrel Stinson

Prime Minister Jean Chrétien gets up close and personal with a protester. Below: NDP leader Thomas Mulcair, Tory chuck-a-bub Peter Van Loan, Liberal Fuddle-Duddler Pierre Trudeau, New Democrat Nathan Cullen, known for his gentlemanly conduct combined with a high standard of playing ability.

Maybe I’ve just spent too much time hanging around the dojo, but I don’t think most Canadians would have been particularly troubled if Opposition Leader Thomas Mulcair had planted a well-placed social democratic boot on Conservative House Leader Peter Van Loan’s ample behind yesterday afternoon.

Alert readers will by now be aware that Mr. Van Loan waddled

. . . → Read More: Alberta Diary: Hockey-starved Canucks pray for brawl as Peter Van Loan channels Darrel Stinson

Random Ranting Raving and Ratings: What does Stephen Harper have against attending Premier’s Conferences?

Stephen Harper has never attended a Premier’s Conference.  He has been Prime Minister since 2006 and has turned down every invitation extended him to attend.

Yesterday during Opposition Day in the House of Commons the NDP put forward a motion that the Prime Minister accept the most recent… ..

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- While Thomas Walkom’s latest has faced some justified criticism from a couple of angles, this part at least looks to be right on the money: The assumption here was that if businesses were allowed to keep more of their profits they would invest them productively.

But in the real world, corporations don’t invest when the economic outlook looks gloomy. Why hire workers if you’re not sure you can sell what they produce?

Instead, corporations took the extra profits provided by government and sat on them — either in the form of cash

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Canadian Progressive: Radicals for our coast: New Democrat MPs and community reps (VIDEO)

A must-watch video on the ongoing fight against Enbridge’s cursed pipeline. The following New Democrat MPs visit Terrace, Kitimat and Kitamaat, British Columbia, and discuss the energy giant’s proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline: Deputy Leader and Environment critic, Megan Leslie (Halifax); House Leader, Nathan Cullen (Skeena-Bulkley Valley); Public Safety & LGBTT critic, Randall Garrison (Esquimalt–Juan de Fuca); Western Economic Diversification Canada & Deputy Fisheries critic, Fin Donnelly (New Westminster—Coquitlam); and Alex Atamanenko (BC Southern Interior). RELATED: Wanted: “Radicals” Against Enbridge’s Northern Gateway Pipeline

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your day.

- For those wondering what might become of Nathan Cullen’s leadership campaign plan to work with progressives of all party stripes, we now have part of the answer: in advance of the Calgary Centre by-election, Cullen will be reaching out to discuss how to challenge the Cons.

- Jim Stanford highlights rankings of corporate size showing just how dependent Canada already is on the finance and resource sectors – a problem which the Cons are of course determined to exacerbate.

- Meanwhile, Sarah Jaffe points out what I’m sure is only a purely

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

daveberta.ca - Alberta politics blog: nathan cullen aims to unite progressives in calgary-centre.

TweetSkeena-Bulkley Valley New Democrat Member of Parliament Nathan Cullen is jumping into Calgary’s Stampede celebrations next week to host a workshop on uniting progressives in advance of the inevitable by-election in Calgary-Centre. On July 11, Mr. Cullen will co-host a workshop with Edmonton-Strathcona NDP MLA Rachel Notley with the goal of sending “Stephen Harper a [...]

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Michael Harris lists ten things the Harper Cons want Canadians to forget before the 2015 election. But it’s worth keeping in mind that their expectations for mind-wiping are surely shaped by their own willingness to completely forget what they were repeating incessantly before a change in talking points: just look how quickly they switched from pointing to a supposed plan to respond to the Auditor General’s criticism of the F-35 procurement process to claiming nobody could possibly have taken seriously the promise they’d make numbers public.

- But as Nathan Cullen noted in

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Driving The Porcelain Bus: Opposition Reacts To Speaker’s Ruling On Budget Bill

Opposition Reacts To Speaker’s Ruling On Budget Bill

Earlier today from Nathan Cullen, NDP House Leader: (from MaCleans.ca: C-38: ‘Mr. Speaker, let us do the right thing’)

Earlier today, NDP House leader Nathan Cullen stood in the House to respond to Elizabeth May’s point of order. Marc Garneau, for the Liberals, and Peter Van Loan, for the Conservatives, responded yesterday. The Speaker says he will get back to the House in “due course.” Below, the text of Mr. Cullen’s remarks. Nathan Cullen: Mr. Speaker, I rise today with respect to the point of order that was (Read more…)

. . . → Read More: Driving The Porcelain Bus: Opposition Reacts To Speaker’s Ruling On Budget Bill

Impolitical: C-38 Speaker’s ruling reaction

Key point on Scheer’s ruling and the ongoing discussion over C-38, the government’s monstrous omnibus bill that jams unrelated and consequential bills into the budget process: “It’s something that clearly means we’re going to have to change the way Parliament does business,” Rae said. “If we can’t succeed in doing that under this government, we’ll have to succeed in doing it under a government in the future.”

This is not an inside the Queensway argument after all that should be diminished as something people don’t care about. Good government is one of our constitutional hallmarks (section 91)

. . . → Read More: Impolitical: C-38 Speaker’s ruling reaction

centerandleft: Free Riders and Dire Needers

Breaking news: bad jobs exist.

In a classic case of Conservatives boiling down an issue to a wide-sweeping preposterous claim, Jim Flaherty claimed that “there is no bad job”. Yikes

Flaherty is proposing reforms to the Employment Insurance program, making it harder for Canadians to remain on the program for long periods. The Canadian Government has committed to redefining what should be considered “appropriate work” when unemployed citizens claiming EI are mulling a new career, which, in all likelihood, means finding skilled workers lower paying work.

I believe the reform motivation stems from an attempt to curb the (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading.

- Joan Bryden reports on the Cons’ latest abuses of majority government power, this time in allocating and shuffling around the few opposition days already available in Parliament for their own purposes. But it’s worth noting the difference between the responses of the affected parties.

On the one hand, Marc Garneau’s answer falls into the familiar trap of hoping that the public will rally around the Libs’ sense of grievance at being mistreated by the Cons: Liberals say government House leader Peter Van Loan told his Liberal counterpart, Marc Garneau, that the less-than-optimal timing

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

centerandleft: I Am Not Afraid of an Abortion Debate

If we, as Canadians, believe a woman ought to have the right to choose whether to terminate a pregnancy, why are we so afraid of having our views challenged? Why is it so frightening to open up debate on this socially contentious issue? If we are an open, democratic society, where free thinking is encouraged while censorship is contemptible, we should allow our values to enter into debate, have them come under attack, only to demonstrate why they are the superior values.

Pro-Life Supporters Eager for Debate, MPs, Not So Much | Chris Wattie – National Post

Stephen Woodworth, a (Read more…)