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The Progressive Economics Forum: Enumerating Homeless Persons

Over at the web site of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, I’ve written a blog post titled “Ten things to know about Canadian attempts to count homeless persons through Point-in-Time Counts.”

Points I raise in the post include the following:

-Efforts to enumerate homeless persons in Canada often have mixed objectives. In part, an attempt is . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Enumerating Homeless Persons

The Progressive Right: Elections – Why Bother, They’re Awful ( #Pickering #pickpoli )

There are a lot of people out applauding Pickering City Council’s decision to appoint rather than hold a by-election to fill the vacant Ward 3 council seat because – as the argument goes – holding a by-election serves no one because it’s expensive, it’d be held during an inclement time of the year, and . . . → Read More: The Progressive Right: Elections – Why Bother, They’re Awful ( #Pickering #pickpoli )

The Progressive Economics Forum: Calgary Homeless Foundation’s Research Agenda

The Calgary Homeless Foundation (CHF) has just released its updated Research Agenda (which I co-authored). CHF is a non-governmental organization that disburses funding to non-profit organizations in Calgary to help persons experiencing homelessness. Our Research Agenda is a bit like an annual report (except it typically comes out once very two years).

The following points . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Calgary Homeless Foundation’s Research Agenda

The Progressive Economics Forum: Do Calgary and Edmonton need more power and resources?

Over at the web site of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, I’ve written a blog post titled “Do Calgary and Edmonton need more power and resources?” The blog post comes as the Government of Alberta considers the possibility of, well, giving more power and sources to both Calgary and Edmonton.

Points raised in the blog post . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Do Calgary and Edmonton need more power and resources?

The Progressive Economics Forum: Using Data to End Homelessness in Calgary

Over at the web site of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, I’ve written a blog post titled “Using Data to End Homelessness in Calgary.” The link to the English version is here; the link to the French version here. . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Using Data to End Homelessness in Calgary

The Progressive Economics Forum: L’itinérance au Canada: Sa croissance, les réponses politiques, et le plaidoyer

Le 1er février, j’ai fait une présentation sur l’itinérance adressée aux étudiants du séminaire d’études supérieures de monsieur Steve Pomeroy à la School of Public Policy and Administration à l’Université Carleton. Le thème de ma présentation a été l’émergence de l’itinérance au Canada en tant que domaine politique publique pressant dans les années 1980. J’ai […] . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: L’itinérance au Canada: Sa croissance, les réponses politiques, et le plaidoyer

The Progressive Economics Forum: Homelessness in Canada: Its Growth, Policy Responses, and Advocacy

On February 1, I gave a guest presentation on homelessness to a graduate seminar class on housing policy taught by Steve Pomeroy at Carleton University’s School of Public Policy and Administration. The focus of my presentation was the emergence of homelessness in Canada as a pressing public policy area in the 1980s. I discussed the […] . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Homelessness in Canada: Its Growth, Policy Responses, and Advocacy

The Progressive Economics Forum: Dix choses à savoir sur les défis associés avec mettre fin à l’itinérance au Canada

Le 18 novembre, j’ai fait une présentation sur les défis en ce qui concerne « mettre fin à l’itinérance » au Canada au 7 Cities Leadership Summit à Edmonton. Ma présentation, illustrée de diapositives, peut être téléchargée ici. Voici dix choses à savoir en tant que défis concernant « mettre fin à l’itinérance » au Canada. […] . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Dix choses à savoir sur les défis associés avec mettre fin à l’itinérance au Canada

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten Things to Know About the Challenges of Ending Homelessness in Canada

On November 18, I gave a presentation on “ending homelessness” at the 7 Cities Leadership Summit in Edmonton. My PowerPoint slides can be downloaded here.

Here are ten things to know about “ending homelessness” in Canada:

1. In 2008, Calgary became the first Canadian municipality to publicly commit to “ending homelessness.” More than a dozen . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten Things to Know About the Challenges of Ending Homelessness in Canada

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten Things to Know About Homelessness in Canada

This afternoon I gave a presentation at Raising the Roof’s Child & Family Homelessness Stakeholder Summit in Toronto. My slide deck can be downloaded here. To accompany the presentation, I’ve prepared the following list of “Ten Things to Know About Homelessness in Canada.”

1.Efforts to enumerate persons experiencing homeless have generally been spotty, but it . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten Things to Know About Homelessness in Canada

The Progressive Economics Forum: Dix Choses à Savoir sur l’Itinérance au Canada

Cet après-midi, j’ai fait une présentation au Child & Family Homelessness Stakeholder Summit, organisé par Chez Toit, à Toronto. Ma presentation, illustrée de diapositives, peut être téléchargée ici. Pour accompagner la présentation, je vous ai préparé la liste suivante des « Dix choses à savoir sur l’itinérance au Canada. »

1. Les tentatives de dénombrer . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Dix Choses à Savoir sur l’Itinérance au Canada

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Richard Nisbett comments on the situational determinants of behaviour which are far too often mistaken for merit or accomplishment. Libby Kane points out how increasing inequality and the predictable social segregation which follows makes it harder for the lucky few to see the deprivation that develops around . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, reminding us that it’s our communities who ultimately pay the price for the poorly-thought-out election announcements from senior levels of government that we’ve seen so frequently recently.

For further reading…– CTV reported on last week’s Evraz Place expansion announcement, while the Leader-Post offered an all-too-obvious example of cheerleading for a shiny new project while . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– 24 Hours offers a debate as to whether or not we should pursue a basic income – though it’s striking that the “con” case is based almost entirely on a message that a secure income for everybody can’t be achieved, rather than any argument that it shouldn’t.

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading.

– Geoff Stiles writes that instead of providing massive subsidies to dirty energy industries which don’t need them (and which will only have more incentive to cause environmental damage as a result), we should be investing in a sustainable renewable energy plan: (W)hereas countries such as Norway have . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

The Progressive Right: Ontario’s 2014 Municipal Elections – Who Can Vote Where? #onpoli

On October 27, all of Ontario’s municipalities will hold elections to elect (or re-elect) mayors, councillors, and school trustees. In order to vote in the election, you must meet the two “standard” criteria – be at least 18 and a Canadian citizen.

Further, you must be eligible to vote in the municipality. Who is eligible? . . . → Read More: The Progressive Right: Ontario’s 2014 Municipal Elections – Who Can Vote Where? #onpoli

The Progressive Right: Ontario’s 2014 Municipal Elections – Who Can Vote Where? #onpoli

On October 27, all of Ontario’s municipalities will hold elections to elect (or re-elect) mayors, councillors, and school trustees. In order to vote in the election, you must meet the two “standard” criteria – be at least 18 and a Canadian citizen.

Further, you must be eligible to vote in the municipality. Who is eligible?

1. Be a Resident Elector
Your residence is where you live. If you live in a municipality, then you are eligible to vote in that municipality’s election. You are only allowed to have one residence.

2. Be a Non-resident Elector 
If you live in one municipality, and own or rent property in another municipality, you are eligible to vote in each municipality’s election.

3. As the spouse of a non-resident elector 
If your spouse qualifies as a non-resident elector in a municipality, then you can also vote in that municipality’s election. 

That`s right. You do not need to be a resident of the municipality in order to be eligible to vote in their election. As a property owner or renter, you have the right to vote for the municipal government.
You can confirm you`re on the list of electors by checking VoterLookup.ca. Check both your residence and your non-resident property addresses.

Now you know.

. . . → Read More: The Progressive Right: Ontario’s 2014 Municipal Elections – Who Can Vote Where? #onpoli

Scripturient: Blog & Commentary: Twenty years of strategic planning

Twenty years ago – May, 1994 – the Town of Collingwood started a community-based strategic plan. That report was released in October, 1995. Then in October, 2000, Vision 2020 released its Blueprint Collingwood. These two documents are generally forgotten by the general public today, but they have been the basis of planning, of policy and . . . → Read More: Scripturient: Blog & Commentary: Twenty years of strategic planning

The Progressive Economics Forum: More on the At Home/Chez Soi Study

Earlier this month, I blogged about the At Home/Chez Soi homelessness study prior to the release of its final report.

Today I’ve blogged again, this time about the contents of the final report itself. This second blog post, being rather long and nuanced, was written for the Homeless Hub. It can be accessed at this . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: More on the At Home/Chez Soi Study

The Progressive Economics Forum: 10 Things to Know About the At Home/Chez Soi Study

On Tuesday, April 8, results of the Mental Health Commission of Canada‘s At Home/Chez Soi homelessness study will be released at an Ottawa press conference. The study followed more than 2,000 participants in five Canadian cities. All were homeless when the study began. Half of them received the Housing First intervention, and half of them . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: 10 Things to Know About the At Home/Chez Soi Study

Scripturient: Blog & Commentary: Should councillors abstain from voting?

In an earlier post, I wrote that Collingwood’s Integrity Commissioner, Robert Swayze, proposed two changes to the town’s Procedural Bylaw: amending section 13.7 and deleting section 13.8. Last post I dealt with the former; here I will explain my concerns about the latter. Section 13.8 currently reads: 13.8 No vote – deemed negative – exception . . . → Read More: Scripturient: Blog & Commentary: Should councillors abstain from voting?

Scripturient: Blog & Commentary: Brands, Buzz & Going Viral

My third book for Municipal World, Brands, Buzz & Going Viral, has just been published as part of the Municipal Information Series. I received my author’s copies yesterday. I am very proud of this book; it took a lot of work to research and write. I enjoyed writing it. I hope readers find it both . . . → Read More: Scripturient: Blog & Commentary: Brands, Buzz & Going Viral

The Progressive Economics Forum: Homelessness Policy

This afternoon, I gave a presentation on public policy responding to homelessness in Canada, with a focus on the past decade. I gave the presentation at this year’s annual conference of the Ontario Non-Profit Housing Association.

Points I made in the presentation include the following:

-Once inflation is accounted for, the current annual value of . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Homelessness Policy

Accidental Deliberations: On consistent rules

Bill Curry reports that many Canadian municipalities are wondering why Rob Ford has access to funding streams not available to anybody else: Ottawa’s $660-million gift to Toronto for a subway extension will come from a program that does not yet exist, leaving Canada’s other cities confused as to how they can get in on the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On consistent rules

Scripturient: Blog & Commentary: The Enemies List

Canadians barely lifted an eyebrow in surprise when it was revealed that our Prime Minister had an “enemies list” compiled as a warning to newly-minted cabinet ministers laying out who they can’t trust. I mean, we’ve lived with Harper as leader long enough not be shocked by anything that seems petty, autocratic, paranoid or Republican. . . . → Read More: Scripturient: Blog & Commentary: The Enemies List