The Canadian Progressive: Making Sense of the CETA

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives says the Canada-EU trade deal favours large multinational corporations and burdens consumers, the environment, and the greater public interest. The post Making Sense of the CETA appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Cracked Crystal Ball II: The Corporate Tax Regime In Canada Is Corporate Welfare

… and it is being done at the expense of Canadians. Corporate Canada Pays Low Taxes But Contributes In Lots Of Other Ways Consider the following: PricewaterhouseCoopers did its own analysis — a survey of the Canadian Council of Chief Executives’ roughly 150 members. It was voluntary and only 63 replied. But of those who ...

Bill Longstaff: Support the tax gap motion

That governments are robbed of billions of dollars by the rich and by corporations exploiting tax havens is a well-known national and international scandal. It is now standard practice for corporations to exploit a variety of often opaque schemes to shift profits into low or no-tax jurisdictions. The corporate tax rate in Canada, including federal ...

The Canadian Progressive: PETITION: British Crown Must Honour Canada-First Nations Treaties, Revoke Bill C-45, And Fire Harper & GG

Dear British Crown: honour Canada-First Nations treaties, revoke Bill C-45, and immediately fire Prime Minister Harper and Governor General Johnston: Please sign the PETITION: British Crown Must Honour Canada-First Nations Treaties, Revoke Bill C-45 now! Petition text: On the 28th January 2013, just 6 hours before the Canadian Parliament resumes in Ottawa, one of the ...

Bill Longstaff: Starbucks sticks it to the Brits

I always look forward to reading yet another story about how multinational corporations slither out of their tax responsibilities and was, therefore, duly amused by a piece I encountered in Al Jazeera about the world’s favourite coffee shop. It appears Starbucks, while selling £643-million worth of goods in the U.K. last year, paid not a ...

Right of Center Ice: Wikileaks: It’s not free speech

Part 1: An issue of semantics? Maybe I’m splitting hairs, but I don’t necessarily view the Wikileaks drama as being an exercise of acting on a person’s right to free speech. My question: how is it a person’s right to be able to view a confidential document, pass judgment on it, and leak it to ...