Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Brin examines the crucial role the public sector plays in driving economic development – as well as the disturbingly large movement seeking to end any further progress – Anna Gorman reports on California’s ambitious plans to improve the health and social welfare of its most vulnerable ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Peter Fleming writes that the promise of entrepreneurial self-employment has given way to the nightmare of systematic precarious work: (T)he move to reclassify people as self-employed follows a very simple formula: it helps reduce labour costs and maximise profits for businesses that would rather use contractors than a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Christopher Ingraham points out that while many luxuries are getting cheaper with time, the necessities of life are becoming much more difficult to afford: Many manufactured goods — like TVs and appliances — come from overseas, where labor costs are cheaper. “International, global competition lowers prices directly ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – David Dayen wonders whether the Obama administration’s decision to end the use of private prisons might represent the needed start of a movement away from relying on poor corporate services as a substitute for public action: Private prisons experienced more safety and security incidents. They had higher rates ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – David Dayen wonders whether the Obama administration’s decision to end the use of private prisons might represent the needed start of a movement away from relying on poor corporate services as a substitute for public action: Private prisons experienced more safety and security incidents. They had higher rates ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ann McFeatters reminds us of the good a government can do when it dedicates itself to identifying and responding to urgent public needs. And Bill McKibben makes the case for an all-out mobilization against climate change: We’re used to war as metaphor: the war on poverty, the war ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – James Stewart examines how Donald Trump could be paying zero taxes using shelters designed specifically to enrich real estate developers while serving no social purpose. And Alexandra Thornton and Brendan Duke point out the “pass-through” loophole being exploited more and more by U.S. corporations. – Daniel Tencer ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Owen Jones interviews Ha-Joon Chang about the foreseeable harm caused by the UK’s austerity, as well as the false claims used to push it. – The Stoney Creek News rightly argues that Canada Post should move toward posting banking in large part due to the potential to improve ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Thomas Walkom writes that with both major U.S. presidential candidates taking an understandably skeptical view of free-trade agreements in their current form, Canada shouldn’t be planning on the past trade model continuing to spread. – Ben Guarino discusses how climate change is leading to the spread of toxic ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Andrew Jackson discusses the challenge of ensuring that stable jobs are available in Canada: Good jobs are a central mechanism in the creation of shared prosperity. What matters for workers is not just being able to find any job but also security of employment, level of pay, working conditions, and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Danny Dorling writes about the importance of empathy and kindness in establishing the basis for a more equal society: When you cannot empathise with another group, it is very hard to think kindly towards them. It is when you feel “all in it together” or at least “there ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Brian Nolan, Max Roser, and Stefan Thewissen study (PDF) the relationship between GDP and household income across the OECD, and find a nearly universal pattern of nominal economic growth which isn’t finding its way into households (which is particularly extreme in the U.S.). Roy van der Weide, ...

Montreal Simon: The Amazing Rocket and America’s New Supergun

It's amazing what we humans can do when we push the boundaries of science.Like fire off this SpaceX rocket from Cape Canaveral in Florida, deploy a satellite.Then land the first stage on a so-called drone ship in the North Atlantic. And this is what a new and speeded up video of that landing looks like from the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – James Wilt discusses a much-needed effort to map out the connections between fossil fuel corporations. And Bruce Campbell highlights how the resource sector is among the most prominent examples of regulatory capture in Canada. – Meanwhile, Steven Chase notes that even as Stephane Dion tries to excuse the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Branko Milanovic discusses how our current means of measuring inequality may leave out the most important part of the story in the form of wealth deliberately hidden from public view: (T)here are at least two problems. First, the rich especially, but everybody else as well, have a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – The BBC reports that even UK business groups are acknowledging that excessive executive pay is leading to public concern and distrust in the state of the economy. And Alex Hern notes that Steve Wozniak for one isn’t shy to point out the need for Apple and other corporations ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones argues that public policy and social activism are needed to rein in the excesses of a corporate class which sees it as its job to extract every possible dollar from the society around it: A financial elite plunged the country into calamity and effectively got ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Alexander Panetta reports on the G20’s agreement on the need to crack down on tax evasion – as well as the steps Canada needs to take to get our own house in order: The final communique warned of actions against countries that don’t agree within a year ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – George Monbiot discusses how neoliberal ideology has managed to take over as the default assumption in global governance – despite its disastrous and readily visible effects: (T)he past four decades have been characterised by a transfer of wealth not only from the poor to the rich, but within ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – GOOD Magazine neatly sums up what the world would look like on the scale of 100 people – and how patently unfair wealth inequality looks in that context: – Lawrence Mishel and David Cooper point out that a $15 minimum wage is entirely in keeping with actual economic ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning LInks

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Peter Moskowitz highlights why we shouldn’t be counting on crowdfunding or other private sources to address social needs. And Lana Payne calls out the attitude of entitlement on the part of the wealthy which has bled our public sector dry. – Meanwhile, Rob Gillezeau points out the Libs’ ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Errol Mendes points out that any commitment to securing human rights in our foreign policy is currently limited by the lack of any systematic attempt to see how those rights are being treated. And Rick Mercer rants about the Libs’ gall in misleading Canadians about the sales of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – John O’Farrell argues that a basic income provides a needed starting point for innovation and entrepreneurship by people who don’t enjoy the advantage of inherited wealth: But in fact it is the current situation that prevents initiative and holds back entrepreneurs. Anyone who ever invented or created anything ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Justin Fox explores why it took the economic field in general (with some noteworthy exceptions) decades to start dealing with burgeoning inequality. And Bryce Covert discusses the latest study showing that in looking beyond tax data alone, the level of inequality is even worse than it’s appeared ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Robert Reich discusses the unfairness of requiring workers to take all the risk of precarious jobs while sharing few of the rewards: On demand and on call – in the “share” economy, the “gig” economy, or, more prosaically, the “irregular” economy – the result is the same: no predictable earnings ...