Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Thomas Piketty discusses our choice between developing models of global trade which actually produce positive results for people, or fueling the fire of Trump-style demogoguery: The main lesson for Europe and the world is clear: as a matter of urgency, globalization must be fundamentally re-oriented. The main challenges ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Baratunde Thurston makes the point that even beyond income and wealth inequality, there’s an obviously unfair distribution of second chances in the U.S. depending on one’s race and class. Denis Campbell reports on the link between poverty and childhood obesity, while Jen St. Denis highlights how poverty ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Danyaal Raza discusses how climate change is manifesting itself in immediate health problems. And John Vidal highlights the latest research on the rapid melting of Arctic ice – making it particularly appalling that Canada has abandoned its main Arctic port to rot. – Elizabeth McSheffrey notes that the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Branko Milanovic argues that there’s plenty of reason to be concerned about inequality even if one puts aside a utilitarian comparison of individual needs and benefits: (I)nequality of opportunity affects negatively economic growth (so we now have a negative effect going from my third ground back to ...

Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Glenn Greenwald interviews Alex Cuadros about his new book on how Brazil has been warped politically and economically by the whims of its billionaire class. And PressProgress takes a look at the impact of economic inequality on Canada’s cities. – Sharon Wright examines how draconian restrictions on social ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon reminds us why even if we were to (pointlessly) prioritize raw GDP over fair distributions of income and wealth, inequality is bad for economic growth in general: The more we redistribute income and wealth, the more consumption increases, which then increases demand. In turn, this should ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canada’s Surveillance Crisis: Spy Agencies Must Come Clean

Three years after Edward Snowden’s eye-opening state surveillance revelations, it’s time for the Communications Security Establishment and Canada’s other spy agencies to come clean. The post Canada’s Surveillance Crisis: Spy Agencies Must Come Clean appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Christopher Jencks discusses why the U.S.’ poor are only getting poorer (in part due to the misapprehension that social programs aren’t available) in reviewing Kathryn Edin and Luke Shaefer’s $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America: In $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in ...

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: Why Telecom Transparency Reporting in Canada Still Falls Short

Internet law expert Michael Geist explains how Rogers Communications’ recent transparency report “provides new insights into how much – or how little – Canadians know about when their personal information is disclosed to government agencies.” The post Michael Geist: Why Telecom Transparency Reporting in Canada Still Falls Short appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – James Wilt discusses a much-needed effort to map out the connections between fossil fuel corporations. And Bruce Campbell highlights how the resource sector is among the most prominent examples of regulatory capture in Canada. – Meanwhile, Steven Chase notes that even as Stephane Dion tries to excuse the ...

The Canadian Progressive: Budget 2016: Is It The End of a Canadian Digital Strategy?

Internet law expert Michael Geist explains how “Canada’s long road toward a national digital strategy may have come to an end with Budget 2016.” The post Budget 2016: Is It The End of a Canadian Digital Strategy? appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Susan Delacourt writes that the Libs’ federal budget is best seen as requiring an overriding “to be continued”. And Don Martin flags a few points which may prove important later – including what might be an unexplained delay of any electoral reform. – Meanwhile, Teuila Fuatai highlights how ...

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: The Case Against Canada Ratifying The Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement

This week, Internet and e-commerce law expert, Michael Geist, concluded his illuminating 50-day series on the “trouble with the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP)” by presenting a compelling case against Canada ratifying the trade agreement. The post Michael Geist: The Case Against Canada Ratifying The Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Robert Reich points out how perpetually more severe corporate rights agreements are destroying the U.S.’ middle class. And Michael Geist concludes his must-read series by summarizing the dangers of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (and making the case against ratifying it). – Jeremy Runnalls writes about the growing movement toward ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Elise Gould studies the continued rise of wage inequality in the U.S. And Teuila Fuatai points out how a strong movement to improve minimum wages and study basic incomes in Canada still has a long way to go to secure a living income anywhere. – Michael Geist’s series ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – PressProgress highlights the disturbingly large number of Canadians spending more than half their income on a restrictively-defined set of basic necessities. And Elaine Power points out what a basic income could do to end food insecurity and improve public health: We know from the social determinants of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Sally Goemer writes that extreme inequality is a cause of economic instability for everybody. And Tom Powdrill discusses the importance of organized labour in ensuring the fair sharing of income, while Steven Hill points out the harmful effects of precarious work. – Sheila Regehr and Roderick Benns ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canadian think-tank wants to demystify the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives just launched a new series of reports seeking to “demystify” the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) as Canada inches closer to ratifying the controversial trade deal. The post Canadian think-tank wants to demystify the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Heather Stewart discusses the possibility of a 20-hour work week to better distribute both work and income. And without going that far, Andrew Jackson suggests that our public policy priorities should include a needed shift in time on the clock from people who are working excessive hours ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Oxfam offers its latest look at global inequality, featuring the finding that 62 people now control as much wealth as half of the people on the planet. And the Equality Trust discusses how that extreme inequality is eroding any sense of community: Inequality is a huge threat to ...

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: TPP puts global health at risk

Internet and E-commerce Law expert Michael Geist explains how the TPP’s protections of biological drugs “represent a significant problem for global health” by limiting access to cutting edge medicines. The post Michael Geist: TPP puts global health at risk appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Jordan Yadoo discusses the increasing inequality in lifespans across the income scale. Roderick Benns writes that Belleville (along with Cornwall) has joined the movement calling for a basic income so everybody has some measure of security. And Chris Dillow theorizes that it’s non-material goods which are most inaccessible ...

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: The Trouble with the TPP’s Copyright Term Extension

The TPP’s copyright term extension discourages creativity, restricts access, and imposes enormous costs on Canadian consumers and educational institutions, argues Internet law expert, Michael Geist. Meanwhile, the term extension is “a major windfall for the United States.” The post Michael Geist: The Trouble with the TPP’s Copyright Term Extension appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Desmond Cole rightly slams the stinginess of Ontario’s government in taking support away from parents based on child support which isn’t actually received. And Karl Nerenberg laments Bill Morneau’s decision to let the Scrooges among Canada’s finance ministers dictate the future of the Canada Pension Plan. – ...

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: What Now? Privacy and Surveillance in Canada After the Paris Attacks

The recent Paris terror attacks shouldn’t stop the new Liberal government from re-examining Canada’s privacy and surveillance policies, argues Michael Geist, the Canada research chair in Internet and e-commerce law at the University of Ottawa. The post Michael Geist: What Now? Privacy and Surveillance in Canada After the Paris Attacks appeared first on The Canadian ...