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cartoon life: How about a transit-run AI self-driving smart car system for #ldnont?

Hmmm, maybe a crazy idea. My retro future fantasy brain on a spree. The city transit service could run a small fleet of AI Smart, small self-driving cars. Electric. We know they’re coming. A kind of car share system managed by a transit authority. You could hire one over the phone or through an app […] . . . → Read More: cartoon life: How about a transit-run AI self-driving smart car system for #ldnont?

Defend Public Healthcare: Why long-term care needs to improve

CUPE and OCHU are campaigning for a legislated minimum average of four worked hours of nursing and personal care per resident per day in long-term care (LTC) facilities. Key points:  [1] The relevant population is increasing rapidly; [2] New beds are not being created at the same pace; [3] Resident acuity and impairment is . . . → Read More: Defend Public Healthcare: Why long-term care needs to improve

Defend Public Healthcare: Ontario elder care: fewer staff, more privatization, more private payment

A new report sponsored by the Canadian Institute for Health Information and completed by Statistics Canada indicates that staffing at Ontario long-term care facilities (LTC) falls short of other provinces. The Long-Term Care Facilities Survey indicates that Ontario has 0.598 health care full time equivalent staff (FTE) per LTC bed. Canada (excluding Quebec, which is . . . → Read More: Defend Public Healthcare: Ontario elder care: fewer staff, more privatization, more private payment

Defending Public Healthcare: For-profit LTC beds attract fewer applicants than not-for-profit beds

Government data suggests for-profit long-term care beds are less desired by the public than not-for-profit beds.    There are long wait lists for a beds in long-term care (LTC) facilities.  (This is driven by the government’s decision to add only a few new LTC beds despite the rapid growth in the number of . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: For-profit LTC beds attract fewer applicants than not-for-profit beds

Defending Public Healthcare: Why are fewer hospital patients waiting for LTC?

Ontario hospitals report a significant decline in the number of patients in hospital beds who are waiting for a long term care bed.  From November 2009 to March 2013, the number of patients waiting for LTC was reduced by 1,282 patients, an astonishing decline of 41%. This sounds like a victory for better . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: Why are fewer hospital patients waiting for LTC?

Defending Public Healthcare: Ontario homes:1 hour less care per elder per day

The death of a resident at a Toronto long-term care facility, allegedly at the hands of another resident, has raised concerns about inadequate staffing levels in Ontario.

Recent Statistics Canada data indicates that Ontario “homes for the aged” fall well short of staffing for homes for the aged in other provinces.  The total . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: Ontario homes:1 hour less care per elder per day

Defending Public Healthcare: Seniors recommendations head off in wrong direction

The government’s new senior’s “action plan” discussed in the last post follows on from Dr. Samir K. Sinha’s report  for the government “Living Longer Living Well”.  Sinha’s report is labelled only as “Highlights and Key Recommendations”.   A “full report will present considerably more detailed findings and recommendations that will enable the government to . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: Seniors recommendations head off in wrong direction

Defending Public Healthcare: A tiny response to growing elder needs

The Ontario government’s 26 page Action Plan for Seniors came out yesterday.  There’s not much to it.  About half of the report simply rehashes what is already in place. To the good, they at least formally recognize that the elderly population is expanding rapidly and that this is going to require an  “overarching plan” that (absent . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: A tiny response to growing elder needs

Defending Public Healthcare: The future for long-term care looks grim: Mass privatization

As with hospital beds, the government and other proponents of  the near freeze in new long-term care beds suggest that home care can take up the slack.

Does this stand up?  Well, let’s take even a very aggressive version of this theory.  Say that 25% of all people in LTC could be dealt with through . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: The future for long-term care looks grim: Mass privatization

Defending Public Healthcare: Long-term care beds falling well short of need

The Auditor General reports that the stock of long-term care beds in Ontario has grown only 3% since 2004-5.  Over seven years (until 2011-12) that means an annual average growth rate of  0.42% (or about 319 beds per year).

Photo: Derek Tyson

That falls well short of population growth.  But much more important, it falls . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: Long-term care beds falling well short of need

Defending Public Healthcare: Private insurance: no solution for long-term care

As part of its turn from care in facilities, the Ontario government has let the wait lists long-term care facilities explode.  This problem has been around for several years now, and there is little sign the government intends to remedy the problem.  

Instead they simply talk about keeping people in their homes.  It . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: Private insurance: no solution for long-term care

Defending Public Healthcare: Insurance giants look for long-term care business

Giant insurance corporations are pushing into long-term care.

As part of its austerity song book, the Ontario government has pretended that there is no need to expand long-term care, complex continuing care, rehabilitative care, and other forms of care.  If anything needs aren’t met, it can all be solved , this fairy tale goes, by home care . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: Insurance giants look for long-term care business

Defending Public Healthcare: Long-term care: expansion or contraction?

A 2011 Conference Board of Canada report done for the for-profit long-term care (LTC) facilities in Ontario estimates (based on population projections and utilization by age) that 238,000 Ontarians will be in need of long-term care by 2035.  This compares with about 98,000 today.

So we are looking at a need to increase long-term care 143%.   With a 1.5% . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: Long-term care: expansion or contraction?

Defending Public Healthcare: Long-term care industry plans reinvention during austerity

Not all beds in “Long Term Care” facilities provide long term care. “Convalescent care” beds are a form of “short-stay” beds in long-term care (LTC) facilities.  Convalescent beds receive an extra $70.94 more per day than standard “long term” beds do in LTC facilities.  That’s 45.7% more funding than the $155.18 for a standard LTC . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: Long-term care industry plans reinvention during austerity

Defending Public Healthcare: Long term care funding increase: workers bear the brunt

Four months into the fiscal year, and we now know that long term care funding per bed is going up 1.47% in Ontario.

The area that will get the biggest increase will be “Raw Food”, which will see a 3% increase effective July 1. (The 3% is not counting a commitment by the government . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: Long term care funding increase: workers bear the brunt

Defending Public Healthcare: Hospital can’t turn beds over to retirement home

A Windsor hospital has been officially blocked from setting up hospital beds in a for-profit retirement home. 

As noted in June, the Hotel Dieu Hospital was trying to create 18 “assess and restore” hospital beds in a for-profit retirement home in Amhertsburg.   The hitch for the Ministry of Health and LTC wasn’t the for-profit . . . → Read More: Defending Public Healthcare: Hospital can’t turn beds over to retirement home